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Publication numberUS3516180 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 23, 1970
Filing dateOct 22, 1968
Priority dateOct 22, 1968
Publication numberUS 3516180 A, US 3516180A, US-A-3516180, US3516180 A, US3516180A
InventorsThurston Herbert O
Original AssigneeThurston Herbert O
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Anti-chafing leg guard
US 3516180 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 23, V H, o THURSTQN 3,516,180

ANTI-CHAFING LEG GUARD Filed Oct. 22, 1968 Herbert 0. T lwrsfan, Deceased By Helen E. Thurs/an, Execufrbr INVENTOR.

United States Patent i Int. Cl. A43b US. Cl. 362.5 8 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE An accessory for use by a skier. It functions as guard and reduces to a practical minimum painful leg soreness such as ordinarily results from bruising and chafing of the skiers skin in the area directly subjected to frictional pressure, for example, by the usual stiff collar surrounding the high upper of a conventional ski boot. Stated otherwise, it provides an efficient bruise and chafe resisting guard or shield. It is saddled over the vunerable ankle and leg areas, can be strapped in place and is so shaped and proportional in size that the lower curvate portion can be tucked into the aforementioned collar.

provements in a skiers leg guard, morefparticularly, a

longitudinally bowed conformably fitting 'one piece lightweight but rigidified shield can be retentively saddled over the tender flesh and vulnerable skin in that area which is commonly subjected to frictional pressure from the associated ski boot collar while skiing.

More specifically, the concept, generally stated, has to do with effective and reliable protection against frictional pressure and pertains to a simple, practical and feasible form-fitting guard or shield which provides a capably performing pressure intercepting shield andjreceives. and distributes pressures imposed upon it and wards off bruis ing and pain inflicting difiiculties such as are commonly encountered by skiers when resorting to certain pressure generating maneuvers.

Briefly, the protective guard is uniquely designed and adapted for use in conjunction with a ski boot the upper of which is encompassed by a stiff diflicult-to-cope-with ankle and leg encircling collar and is known to exert and impose chafing and crippling pressure on vulnerable ankle and leg surfaces. It is characterized by a plastic or an equivalent guard capable of intercepting, blocking and distributively equalizingpressures which are concentrated and imposed on the tender vulnerable surfaces.

In carrying out'the inevntion the preferred guard comprises an elongated longitudinally-bowed or curvate plastic or equivalent shield. This shield is adapted tn be comfortably'and conformingly saddled over the aformentioned tenderankle and leg surfaces. This guard is of an over-all size and shape that it spans and safeguards the surfaces which are subjected to frictional pressure and attending bruising and chafing as the case may be.

As will be hereinafter more fully appreciated the herein disclosed guard involves an innovation in intercepting and affording protection against frictional pressure. To this end it provides a hard self-shape retaining barrier which when properly associated with the boot collar, pants leg and sock functions to dissipate objectionable frictional pressures thereby preventing any transmission of these forces to the skin andfleshl This unique gaurd or shield is preferably but not necessarily made of moldable plastic material which is reinforced with selfcontained fibrous glass commonlymeferred to in the trade as Fiberglas. n

Thus molded and shaped it is vertically rigid but has flexible terminal ends for ease of placement on and con- Patented June 23, 1970 formability to the leg surfaces cooperable therewith. It will also be significant to note that the guard or shield is substantially rectangular in front elevation and the grade of plastic material used is non-toxic to the skin. In fact, it is low in heat and cold conductivity and while possessing requisite toughness and strength with the vertical rigidity it allows sufiicient flexibility laterally permitting easy attachment and conformable fitting to the leg. Experience has shown that the reinforced plastic guard or shield cannot ordinarily be dented or broken or bent out of shape through normal usage. Being made of moldable plastic material it takes advantage of lightness in weight and provides excellent conforming characteristics and a maximum of serviceability. Then, too it permits precise shaping to an individuals specific or particular need. By immersing the shield in hot water say around 200 F., the shield then becomes pliable and formable for shaping. In fact, after it has cooled and set it will resume and maintain its natural guard forming shape.

In addition to the above this unique shield can be applied over the ski sock or pants leg where it becomes an impervious barrier to any frictional pressure emanating from the boot collar. All of the rubbing by the boot due to constant ankle and knee flexing action is virtually in- I tercepted and absorbed by this simple but nevertheless highly effective guard.

This guard is not only strong, durable and light in weight it is amply thin in profile, which enables it to be slipped on the leg between the pants leg and the ski boot collar and because of its minimal dimensions it takes up very little space. It is Within the purview of the invention to provide the guard with ventilating holes to cope with heat problems. It can also be used in industry job re quirements where wearing of a high upper shoe or boot is essential. Fastenings can be attached if necessary for industrial use and in fact for use when employed by a skier.

It may be added that the guard disclosed usually measures approximately three inches vertically in the center thereof and has end portions which taper slightly toward the respective or terminal ends. The over-all length horizontally could and preferably will be between seven an eight inches.

It is also a matter of significance to mention at the outset that a guard constructed as herein shown and described diminishes rubbing and constant frictional contact between the stiff pressure imposing front portions of the boots collar and that part of the wearers leg which unless protectively shielded would be painfully chafed and distressingly bruised. I

These together with other objects and advantages whi; h will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, .wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout; and in which: 1

FIG. 1 is a view in perspective showing a ski boot having its upper terminating in a stiff ankle embracing collar, showing a portion of a sock, a portion of one leg of the pants and, more particularly, the improved frigctional pressure intercepting and chafe resisting guard;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged view of the guard by itself showing the optionally usable elastic leg encircling'and fetaining strap or band; p

FIG. 3 is a top plan view the purpose of which is to show the guard with the retaining strap attached and which also shows in phantom lines how the flexible end portions are susceptible of being contracted or spread 'to accommodate the leg ofthe wearer.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary detail section taken approximately on the plane of the section line 44 of FIG. 2 looking in the direction of the arrows.

The inventive concept embodies the combination of component parts shown in FIG. 1 and also the subcombination aspect as illustrated in FIGS. 2, 3 and 4.

Insofar as the ski boot 6 is concerned it can be of conventional construction and as shown it embodies a so-called high upper 8 which terminates in a relatively stilf pressure imposing collar 10. The fastenings 12 and other features of the boot are of no moment, that is, patentably speaking.

Inasmuch as the invention lends itself to use in the manner shown in FIG. 1 the numeral 14 designates a sock and the numeral 16 designates a covering or lower portion of a pants or trouser leg. It is within the purview of the invention to apply the guard between the leg 16 and the sock 14 or to apply it over the pants leg 16 in the manner shown.

The leg guard detailed in FIGS. 2, 3 and 4 will virtually prevent soreness, bruised and chafed skin in the ankle area directly subjected to frictional pressure by the front collar portion of the ski boot in the manner shown in FIG. 1. It provides a positive hard barrier which dissipates objectionable frictional pressure. The guard proper is denoted as an entity by the numeral 18. It is preferably longitudinally bowed and substantially rectangular in plan and has a substantially rigid non-yielding central body portion 20 which is of the curvature illustrated and which merges as at 22 into gradually tapering terminal left and right end portions 24 and 26. The upper left hand corner portion is denoted at 28 and the upper right hand corner portion at 30. This portion 30 is provided on its exterior surface with a snap fastener 32, that is, a male snap fastener, the same bein constructed and located to accommodate a female snap fastener 34 on the free end portion 36 of an elastic attaching strap or band 38. The opposite end portion 40 is superimposed on the corner and is stitched or otherwise joined thereto as at 42 (FIG. 4). It is to be recalled that the leg guard will be made with or without fastenings. The major or body portion is rigid at 20 for approximately three inches before it becomes amply flexible at the ends 22 to conform with the protectable portion of the leg.

The invention has been used primarily for skiing and has been experimentally tried out and approved as practical by recognized skiers and ski shops. It is made as suggested from reinforced plastic, that is moldable plastic which is reinforced and rigidified by embedded fibrous glass known, as already suggested, as Fiberglas.

The ready-to-use appliance or accessory is shown advantageously in FIG. 2 in readiness for use. In FIG. 3 it is shown that the strap end 36 is fixed and, as will be evident from this view, the structure lends itself to shaping and form fitting in that the end portions can be bent in or out depending on the contour of the surface which is to be protectively covered. In FIG. 1 the shield or guard is shown in place and it would appear from this view that it should be evident that the invention well serves the unique purposes for which it has been devised and successfully used. Accordingly, a more extensive description is deemed to be unnecessary.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention.

I What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. In combination, a ski boot embodying a high upper terminating in a relatively stiff ankle and leg embracing collar, and a pressure intercepting, distributing and equalizing guard adapted to be conformingly saddled over vulnerable surface portions of the ankle and leg which are proximal to and commonly subjected to frictional pressure, said guard having significant portions thereof which when in use can be and are fittingly tucked into cooperating portions of said collar, said guard comprising a horizontally elongated arcuately curved chafe resisting shield of an area to efiicaciously span and cover the aforementioned vulnerable surface portions, said guard being substantially rectangular in front elevation, light in weight, made from moldable sheet plastic material and characterized by an unyielding centralized body portion which is stable, dissipates friction promoting pressures and wards off bruising stress and strain, said plastic material being non-toxic and possessed of low heat and cold conduction properties, and the respective end portions to the left and right respectively of the central body portion being bendable in a manner to conform to the general contour of the boot collar, pants leg, sock and leg portions.

2. The combination defined in and according to claim 1, and wherein said guard is of one-piece construction and amply firm and strong that it provides a barrier, distributes and equalizes pressure imposed thereon by a stiff unyielding ski boot collar while skiing yet lends itself to feasible comforting use in conjunction with an underlying pants leg and worn sock, as'the case may be.

3. The combination defined in and according to claim 1, and wherein said sheet plastic material is reinforced by imbedded fibrous glass known as Fiberglas and while permitting horizontal bending prevents vertical bending and when once properly contoured and set is thereafter self-shape retaining.

4. The combination defined in and according to claim 1, and wherein an elastic leg embracing strap is provided, said strap having end portions connectible with coacting upper corner portions of said guard.

5. For use in conjunction with a ski boot having a high upper terminatin in a stiff ankle and leg encircling collar which while the wearer is skiing usually exerts bruising frictional and chafing pressure on tender and vulnerable surfaces of the skiers ankle and leg, a protective guard capable of intercepting, blocking and distributively equalizing pressures which are concentrated and imposed thereon, said guard comprising an elongated longitudinally bowed shield which is adapted to be conformingly saddled over the aforementioned tender surfaces, said guard being of an over-all size and shape to span and safeguard the surfaces which are subjected to frictional pressures and resulting bruising and chafing, as the case may be, said guard being substantially rectangular in front elevation, light in weight, made from moldable sheet plastic material and characterized by an unyielding centralized body portion which is stable, dissipates friction promoting pressures and wards off bruising stress and strain, said plastic material being non-toxic and possessed of low heat and cold conduction properties, and the respective end portions to the left and right respectively of the central body portion being bendable in a manner to conform to the general contour of the boot collar, pants leg, sock and leg portions.

6. The protective guard defined in and according to claim 5, and wherein said sheet plastic material is reinforced by embedded fibrous glass known as Fiberglas which While permitting horizontal bending prevents vertical bending and when once properly contoured and set is thereafter self-shape retaining, and, in combination, an adjustable leg embracing guard positioning and restraining strap having ends thereof operatively connected to corner portions of the respective end portions of said guard.

7. The protective guard defined in and according to claim 6, and wherein said sheet plastic material is such in substance and inherent properties that when immersed in hot water or otherwise heat-treated it becomes pliant and malleable for manual bending, shaping and form fitting needs and which when cooled suificiently it hardens,

stays put and retains its given conformable state for repetitional use.

8. The protective guard defined in and according to claim 5, and wherein said sheet plastic material is reinforced by embedded fibrous glass which, while it permits horizontal bending, prevents vertical bending and when once properly contoured and set it becomes self-shape retaining, and, in combination, an elastic leg embracing guard positioning and retainin strap carried by and operatively connected to said guard.

6 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS PATRICK D. LAWSON, Primary Examiner

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1211411 *Apr 24, 1915Jan 9, 1917William R ClaxtonLegging.
US1689558 *Dec 14, 1926Oct 30, 1928Julius PattenShin-bone-protecting shield for sports
US2553612 *Nov 15, 1948May 22, 1951James P TaylorSelf-grip waterproof blow distributing shin guard
US3363342 *Jun 13, 1966Jan 16, 1968Rieker & CoSki boot
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4577419 *Apr 2, 1984Mar 25, 1986Adidas Fabrique De Chaussures De SportHigh-top shoe
US5819442 *Oct 24, 1996Oct 13, 1998Lange International S.A.Pair of auxiliary reinforcement pieces for ski boots equipped with these pieces
US6543159Mar 21, 1996Apr 8, 2003The Burton CorporationSnowboard boot and binding strap
EP0442436A2 *Feb 12, 1991Aug 21, 1991NORDICA S.p.ASki boot
EP0777980A1Oct 22, 1996Jun 11, 1997Salomon S.A.Shoe with support of the lower leg
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/117.1, 36/89, 36/50.5, D29/120.1
International ClassificationA43B3/00, A43B5/04, A43B3/02
Cooperative ClassificationA43B5/0415, A43B3/02
European ClassificationA43B5/04D, A43B3/02