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Publication numberUS3517478 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 30, 1970
Filing dateNov 17, 1967
Priority dateNov 17, 1967
Publication numberUS 3517478 A, US 3517478A, US-A-3517478, US3517478 A, US3517478A
InventorsBraastad Gerald G, Grams Walter H, Riddel James F, Shaw William A, Winch George E
Original AssigneeFederal Cartridge Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cartridge packaging machine
US 3517478 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 1970 G. E. WINCH ETAL CARTRIDGE PACKAGING MACHINE 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. 17, 1967 IN... mnN rhm 0 s S A 22 w T aan p Nw mmfl w WM6BP h mi? 55 fin? mu? GMGI June 30, 1970 G. E. WINCH ETAL CARTRIDGE PACKAGING momma Filed Nov. 17, 1967 s Sheets-Sheet z INVENTORS 050 24: 5. a/nvcw M44762 1/. GAMMS y Gee/910 6. 82445740 JAMES F: 10022 WILL/4M A. S/ma/ @M5M w June 30, 1970 s. E. WINCH ETAL 3,517,478

CARTRIDGE PACKAGING MACHINE Filed Nov. 17, 1967 s Sheets-Sheet s s I 5/ 6/ 5/ j 5 62 Z I gill/71:4 A.

lrrozwzys United States Patent Ofi ice 3,517,478 Patented June 30, 1970 3,517,478 CARTRIDGE PACKAGING MACHINE George E. Winch, Anoka, Walter H. Grams, Elk River,

Gerald G. Braastad, St. Francis, James F. Riddel, Elk

River, and William A. Shaw, Champlin, Minn., as-

signors to Federal Cartridge Corporation, Minneapolis,

Minn., a corporation of Minnesota Filed Nov. 17, 1967, Ser. No. 684,018 Int. Cl. B65h 35/30, 19/00, /10

US. Cl. 53-142 8 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A machine for loading firearm cartridges into containers directly from the discharge rail of a gage and weigh machine wherein an elevator bar lifts a preselected number of cartridges from the rail in a horizontal row with cartridges laying side by side and separates the cartridges to the desired packaged spacing and a pusher bar then moves horizontally into engagement with the ends of the cartridges and pushes them axially off of the elevator bar and into a container. An indexing mechanism operated by the pusher bar adjusts the container between two alternate elevations for loading two rows of cartridges into the container during successive cycles of the machine.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The manufacture of cartridges is generally completed by subjecting the cartridges to various tests in a gage and weigh machine. During the passage of the cartridges through such machine they are retained in an oriented position. This orientation is lost as the cartridges are dumped from the machine. Subsequently, the cartridges are deposited in a random mass in the hopper of a packaging machine and orientation is reestablished therein during the packaging operation.

This system is not completely satisfactory for several reasons. It is found, for example, that many cartridges become dented or otherwise marred when they are scooped up in mass and deposited in the packaging machine hopper. Moreover such damage frequently occurs in the packaging machine itself as the components thereof handle the cartridges to reestablish orientation. This requires careful inspection to assure that defective cartridges do not become packaged.

It is also desirable that cartridges receive a minimum of handling to reduce the possibilities of tarnishing. It is found, for example, that the oils and moistness in human hands tends to cause such tarnishing of bright brass cartridge cases.

Moreover conventional cartridge packaging machinery is extremely intricate, expensive and does not lend itself to ready modification to handle cartridges of different gages.

A final problem with conventional cartridge packaging machinery lies in the fact that the machine does not allow for a final visual inspection to determine whether the required number of cartridges are deposited in each package or carton.

The object of the present invention is to solve the above mentioned problems by providing a relatively inexpensive packaging machine which can be used in combination with a gage and weigh machine to package the cartridges directly from the discharge rail of the latter machine while they are still in a controlled or oriented state. In such packaging machine the chances of cartridge damage are virtually eliminated and the packaging machine operator is able to give a final visual inspection during the packaging, thus virtually eliminating the possibility of packaging defective or an insulficient number of cartridges.

The above mentioned and further objects of the invention will be brought to light during the course of the following specification, reference being made to the accompanying drawings, in which FIG. 1 is a plan view of the machine with a'row of cartridges in preloading position.

FIG. 2 is a side elevation of the machine in the same condition as in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a side elevation of the machine in loading position with cartridge bar raised and the pusher bar advanced to the point where the row of cartridges is near complete insertion in the carton.

FIG. 4 is a front end elevation of the machine in the condition shown in FIG. 2.

FIG. 5 is a transverse vertical section through the elevator bar in raised position looking rearwardly and showing the relative spacing of the cartridges at rest in the bar.

FIG. 6 is a transverse vertical section taken through the carton holder looking rearwardly with the raised position of the carton shown in broken lines.

FIG. 7 shows the relative arrangement of two rows of cartridges in a loaded carton.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings reference characters will be used to denote like parts or structural features in the different views. The numeral 10 designates the discharge table or bed of a conventional gage and weigh machine. As the cartridges are discharged from the machine they roll, in the direction indicated by the arrow in FIG. 1, along a slightly inclined track 11 formed by parallel rails 12 and 14.

The packaging machine is designated generally by the numeral 15. The machine includes a frame comprising a bench top 16 supported on legs 17. A pair of rail sections 18 and 19 supported by angle iron Strips are mounted in parallelism on the top 16 in respective alignment with the rails 12 and 14. Suitable means, not shown, are provided for discharging cartridges C in groups of ten to roll outwardly along track 11 and onto rail sections 18 and 19 with all of the cartridges pointing in the same direction and with the rims thereof rolling onto the rear rail section 18. A slide 20 is mounted on the top 16 to the rear of rail section 18 to extend in a fore and aft direction. This slide has a bottom plate 21 and a pair of spaced parallel side walls 22 secured to the top 16 as by bolts 24.

A double-acting air cylinder 25 is mounted on the top 16 to the rear of slide 20 with an extensible rod 26- projecting forwardly therefrom. The cylinder is connected by air lines 27 and 28 to a valve control 29 and a compressor (not shown) whereby air may be admitted to or exhausted from either end of the cylinder to move a piston therein connected to rod 26 axially within the cylinder to selectively extend or retract rod '26. Where desirable a foot control may be used instead of the control 29 and suitable switching means provided for extending and retracting the rod 26 upon a single actuation of the control. The extended end of rod 26 is connected to a guide block 30 which fits in the slide 20 for movement along the bottom 21 thereof. A bar 31 extends forwardly from the block 30 and carries a transversely elongated pusher bar 32 at its forward end. This bar extends outwardly over the side walls 22 of slide 20 in spaced relation thereto and at an elevation somewhat higher than the top edge of rail sec tions 18 and 19 as best seen in FIG. 2.

A pair of blocks 34 are mounted on the underside of the bench top 16 in transversely spaced positions under the rail 19 extending fore and aft thereof. A pair of transversely spaced vertical rods 35 extend slidably one through each block 34 between the rail sections 18 and 19 and a second pair of such rods 36 extend one through each block 34 just forward of rail 19. All of the rods 35 and 36 are secured as by nuts 37 to a rectangular plate 38. On their upper ends and above the bench top 16, the rods 34 jointly support an elongated elevator bar 39 which has a plurality, in the present disclosure ten, of parallel grooves 40 in the top surface thereof (FIG. extending in a fore and aft direction and each adapted to seat a cartridge C. Similarly rods 35 jointly support an elevator bar 41 having grooves 42 aligned one with each groove 40, said bar being located forward of rail section 19.

Rods 35 and 36, plate 38 and elevator bars 39 and 41 accordingly form a unitary assembly which is vertically slidable in the blocks 34. A stop 43 is mounted on the end of bar 39 remote from track 11 and projects upwardly beyond the top surface of the bar.

The bench top 16 and the bottom 21 of the slide 20 are provided with an elongated slot (not shown) which extends longitudinally forward from the cylinder 25. A bracket member 46 has its upper end integrally connected to block 30 and extends downwardly through the slot. Below the bench top 16 the member 46 carries upper and lower forwardly extending arms 47 and 48. The forward portion of the upper arm 47 is formed with an inclined cam shoulder 49 on its upper edge. This shoulder is positioned to engage a roller 50 mounted on bracket 51 connected to plate 38 as arm 47 moves forwardly with block 30 to raise the plate and the elevator bars 39 and 41 as shown in FIG. 3. The purpose of this function will subsequently be explained.

Referring now to FIGS. 2, 3 and 6, it will be observed that a carton holder, denoted generally at 52 is mounted forwardly of the elevator bar 41. The holder includes a pair of transversely spaced side pieces 53 which are suitably secured to the top 16, a carton support plate 54 fitting between the pieces 53, and a backstop 55 hingedly connected to one of the pieces 53 as by hinge 56 for swinging movement on a vertical axis. A coil spring 57 on the hinge yieldably biases the member 56 toward a closed position across the front edges of the side pieces 53. Plate 54, as best seen in FIG. 6, has a pair of vertical legs 58 on its underside which slidably project downwardly through openings in the top 16.

A pair of legs 60 depend from the underside of top 16, one under each side piece 53. These legs are provided with bearings 61 which jointly journal a cross shaft 62. The shaft has a pair of ovular cams 64 mounted thereon one under each leg 58 with the peripheries of the cams in sliding frictional engagement with the legs. It will be understood that when the cams are disposed horizontally, as in FIGS. 3 and 6, the plate 54 will be in a lowered position. However, when shaft 62 is rotated one-quarter turn the cams 64 will rotate therewith to a vertical position and raise the plate 54 to an upper position shown in FIGS. 2 and 4.

A ratchet gear 66 is mounted on shaft 62 between the earns 64. A yoke-shaped member 67, having an arcuate slot 68, has its bight portion journaled on the shaft adjacent to the gear 66. A pawl 69 is pivoted on the member 67 for engagement with the ratchet gear 66.

The lower arm 48 of bracket member 46 carries a roller 70 which rides in slot 68, as will be noted in FIGS. 2 and 3. As the bracket 46 moves forwardly between the positions shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, the roller 70 will swing member 67 forwardly and pawl 69 engaging gear 66 will cause the gear and shaft 62 and cams 64 to rotate onequarter turn. Upon return or rearward movement of the bracket 46 the yoke member will swing down to its original position carrying pawl 69 therewith out of engagement with the ratchet gear. It will accordingly be understood that the cams 64 will turn one-quarter turn with each complete cycle of the cylinder 25, to alternately raise and lower plate 54.

It will be observed that the shoulder 49 on arm 47 is normally disposed just to the rear of the roller 50 so as to raise the elevator bars immediately upon advancement of bracket 46 and before the pusher bar contacts the cartridges lying on the rail sections 18 and 19.

FIG. 7 shows how the cartridges C are packaged in a box B. The box is provided with partitions P providing an independent cell for each cartridge.

Operation of the machine will now be understood. The operator dispenses the number of cartridges to be packaged in a row to roll down the rails 12 and 14 of the gage and weigh machine and onto the sections 18 and 19. The elevator bar 39 is provided with a stop 43 at one end against which the lead cartridge in the row engages. Because the cartridges have a generally forwardly tapered configuration, they will tend to tilt out of axial parallelism as they come to rest against one another on the sections 18 and 19. This can be observed in FIG. 1 where cartridges C have their pointed bullet ends towed in so that the center axes thereof would intersect at some forwardly distant point. It will also be noted that rail section 18 is slightly higher than section 19 so that the cartridges tilt downwardly in their forward extension.

The operator places a box B in the holder 52 in rearwardly opening position with the cover up as shown in FIG. 2. It is desirable, though not absolutely necessary, that plate 54 be in its lowered position during insertion of the first row of cartridges in the box.

The operator then actuates the cylinder 25 through manipulation of control 29. As block 30 moves forwardly the cam surface 49 on bracket arm 47 will engage roller 50 and raise the elevator bars 39 and 41. As previously indicated the grooves 40 and 42 in these bars are semicylindrical on parallel axes. These axes are spaced apart a distance slightly greater than the diameter of the cartridge shell. Such spacing is in fact equal to such diameter plus the thickness of the box partition P. Accordingly as the elevator bar 39 is raised it will lift the cartridges from rail sections 18 and 19 automatically seating one cartridge in each groove 40 so that the axes thereof are parallel and the cartridges slightly spaced apart in longitudinal alignment with the cells in the box B. Immediately after the cartridges have been lifted to such position and with continued advance movement of the block 30, the pusher bar 32 carried thereby will engage the rim ends of the cartridges and push them forwardly through the grooves 42 in bar 41 and into the box as shown in FIG. 3.

Prior to the time the loading occurs the roller 70 moving in slots 68 of member 67 causes the cams 67 to turn ninety degrees in the manner hereinbefore described. This causes plate 54 to ascend to its raised position bringing the lower row of cells in the carton into alignment with bar 41 for loading. Accordingly the next cylcle of operation will lower the box B and insert the next group of cartridges into the upper row. The operator may then withdraw the loaded carton forwardly from the holder, opening member 55 about its hinge axis, and close the carton flap. It will be understood that during the second cycle of operation the plate 54 will be returned to its lowered position.

The machine accordingly handles the cartridges while still in their oriented condition as discharged from the gage and weigh machine and inserts them directly into the cartons in which they are sold to the ultimate consumer. In doing so it properly and automatically positions them for insertion into the carton and adjusts the carton position for alternate insertion of the upper and lower cartridge rows.

It is understood that suitable modifications may be made in the structure as disclosed, provided such modifications come within the spirit and scope of the appended claims. Having now therefore fully illustrated and described our invention, what we claim to be new and desire to protect by Letters Patent is:

1. In a cartridge packaging machine (a) a frame,

(b) support means on the frame for holding a plurality of elongated cartrides in contiguous side by side, generally horizontal alignment,

() an elevator bar disposed below the support means and having a plurality of parallel upwardly opening seats for individually seating said cartridges, H

((1) means for raising the elevator bar upwardly, past the support means to engage the cartridges and lift them from the support means with one shell seated in each seat,

(e) a pusher bar mounted on the frame for horizontal advance sliding movement to simultaneously engage the ends of the cartridges and move them longitudinally off of the elevator bar and into a carton container,

(f) said support means comprising a pair of rail sections disposed on a substantially horizontal plane and perpendicular to the longitudnal axes of the cartridges, and

('g) the path of movement of said elevator bar being between said rails.

2. The subject matter of claim 1 wherein the centers of the seats in said elevator bar are spaced apart a greater distance than the axes of the cartridges as they rest on the support means, to spread the cartridges from the contiguous relation as they are seated in the elevator bar.

3. In a cartridge packaging machine (a) a frame,

(b) support means on the frame for holding a plurality of elongated cartridges in contiguous side by side, generally horizontal alignment,

(c) an elevator bar disposed below the support means and having a plurality of parallel upwardly opening seats for individually seating said cartridges,

(d) means for raising the elevator bar upwardly past the support means to engage the cartridges and lift them from the support means with one shell seated in each seat,

(e) a pusher bar mounted on the frame for horizontal advance sliding movement to simultaneously engage the ends of the cartridges and move them longitudinally off of the elevator bar and into a carton container,

(f) a carton holder mounted on the frame for holding the carton container in cartridge receiving position, and

(g) means for vertically adjusting the carton holder between two different elevations for successive insertion of two rows of cartridges into a container held thereby.

4. The subject matter of claim 3 wherein said elevator bar raising means is operatively connected to said adjustment means to move the carton holder from one elevation to the other each time the elevator bar is raised.

5. In a cartridge packaging machine having a frame carrying a pair of spaced rails for gathering a preselected number of tapered cartridges in contiguous side by side generally horizontal alignment with their longitudinal axes intersecting at some point forward thereof, a carton holder on the frame forward of the rails for supporting a carton partitioned into a horizontal row of cells opening rearwardly toward the cartridges, an elevator bar mounted on the frame for raising and lowering movement between the rails to engage and lift the cartridges therefrom when raised, a pusher bar mounted on the frame to the rear of the elevator bar for fore and aft movement to engage and push the cartridges forwardly oft of the elevator bar into the carton cells, and said elevator bar having a plurality of upwardly opening fore and aft extending parallel grooves in the top surface thereof adapted each to seat one of said cartridges when the elevator bar is raised, and said grooves being so positioned as to shift said cartridges into parallelism and space them apart for respective axial alignment with the carton cells into which they are to be inserted.

6. In a machine for packaging elongated generally clindrical articles in a carton, an elongated fore and aft extending frame, article support means on the frame adapted to receive and hold on the topsurface thereof a row of articles in side by side relation each extending longitudinally of the frame, elevator means mounted on the frame in vertical alignment with the support means and for vertical movement from a position below the plane of said top surface upwardly past the support means and through said plane to engage and lift the row of articles to a position spaced above the article support means, said elevator means having a plurality of upwardly opening seats for individually seating said articles, a carton support on the frame forward of the article support means for holding a carton in horizontal fore-andaft alignment with the row of articles in lifted position, and pusher means mounted on the frame to the. rear of the article support means for fore-and-aft movement therealong and engageable with the article row upon forward movement to push the row of articles forwardly from the elevator means into the carton.

7. The subject matter of claim 6 wherein the pusher means is operatively connected to the elevator means to raise the latter as the pusher means is moved forwardly.

8. In a machine for packaging elongated generally cylindrical articles in a carton, an elongated fore and aft extending frame, article support means on the frame adapted to receive and hold a row of the articles in side by side relation each extending longitudinally of the frame, elevator means mounted for vertical movement on the frame for engaging and raising the row of articles to a position spaced above the article support means, said elevator means having a plurality of upwardly opening seats for individually seating said articles, a carton support on the frame forward of the article support means for holding a carton in horizontal fore and aft alignment with the row of articles in raised position, pusher means mounted on the frame to the rear of the article support means for fore and aft movement therealong and engageable with the article row upon forward movement to push the row forwardly from the elevator means into the carton, said carton support being vertically adjustable between two positions, and means operated by the pusher means for moving the carton support between such positions each time the pusher means is moved forward.

References Cited UNITED STrXTES PATENTS 3,143,223 8/1964 McIntyre et al. 2146.5 3,250,376 5/1966 Griner et al. 53-162 X 2,890,556 6/1959 Engleson et al. 53-251 THERON E. CONDON, Primary Examiner R. L. SPRUILL, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2890556 *Dec 15, 1955Jun 16, 1959Redington Co F BArticle transfer mechanism
US3143223 *Jun 28, 1961Aug 4, 1964Emhart Mfg CoMethod and means for packing articles of tapered shape
US3250376 *Jan 6, 1964May 10, 1966Nat Biscuit CoCross collectors for multiple packaging
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3763626 *Mar 29, 1972Oct 9, 1973Remington Arms Co IncAutomatic point protector applicator
US4514956 *Mar 5, 1982May 7, 1985E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyVacuum transfer apparatus for packing layers of articles in a container
US4567712 *Sep 26, 1984Feb 4, 1986E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyVacuum transfer apparatus for packing layers of articles in a container
US4918907 *Jan 20, 1988Apr 24, 1990T W Kutter Inc.Forming and filling flexible plastic packaging
US5052167 *Nov 7, 1990Oct 1, 1991Scharch Daniel JAmmunition boxing machine
US5060454 *Jan 24, 1991Oct 29, 1991Maschinenfabrik Flums AgMethod and apparatus for packaging cylindrical-shaped objects in boxes
US5074103 *Oct 23, 1990Dec 24, 1991Dowell International Packaging Systems, Inc.Bottle loading machine and method
US5148653 *Aug 14, 1991Sep 22, 1992Scharch Daniel JBoxing machine for rimmed ammunition
US5207727 *Jun 28, 1991May 4, 1993Rapsco IncorporatedCan end handling system
US6049957 *Apr 4, 1996Apr 18, 2000Oerlikon Contraves Pyrotec AgMethod and apparatus for filling shell bodies with sub-projectiles
US6142054 *Feb 18, 2000Nov 7, 2000Oerlikon Contraves Pyrotec AgApparatus for filling shell bodies with sub-projectiles
WO1992000888A1 *Jul 3, 1991Jan 23, 1992Rapsco IncCan end handling system
Classifications
U.S. Classification53/142, 86/47, 53/535, 53/539, 53/150, 53/246, 53/537, 53/245, 53/236
International ClassificationB65B5/10
Cooperative ClassificationB65B5/106
European ClassificationB65B5/10D
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 23, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF BOSTON, 100 FEDERAL STREET,
Owner name: FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF MINNEAPOLIS, FIRST BANK PLA
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:FEDERAL CARLRIDGE CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004489/0975
Effective date: 19851201