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Publication numberUS3517927 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 30, 1970
Filing dateJul 24, 1968
Priority dateJul 24, 1968
Publication numberUS 3517927 A, US 3517927A, US-A-3517927, US3517927 A, US3517927A
InventorsKennel William
Original AssigneeKennel William
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Helical spring bouncing device
US 3517927 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 30, 1970 w. KENNEL 3,517,927

HELICAL SPRING BOUNCING DEVICE Filed July 24, 1968 INVENTOR. WILLIAM KENNEL JOHN P. CHANDLER HIS ATTORNEY.

3,517,927 HELICAL SPRING BOUNCING DEVICE William Kennel, 50-43 60th St., Woodside, NY. 11377 Filed July 24, 1968, Ser. No. 747,352 Int. Cl. A63b 5/00 US. Cl. 272-57 7 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE An exercising and amusement device for young persons comprising a tapered helical structure formed of spring material and having at least three convolutions, a circular base section formed with about two parallel convolutions and a circular top section with at least one convolution which is generally parallel with the base section. A basket or receptacle to receive the person is secured to the top section and depending into the tapered helical structure.

This invention relates to an amusement and exercising device for children and comprising a relatively large coiled compression spring of tapered contour with its end of larger diameter supported on the ground or on the floor of a playroom, and provided at its upper end with a basket or net-like receptacle, or even a harness, in which the child is suspended. Any movement of the child imparts a corresponding movement to the compression spring causing it to flex, bend and sway in much the same fashion as a resilient pole of considerable height responds to shifting of the mass of the human body.

An object of the invention is to provide a rugged but sensitive resilient structure wherein movements of the body, particularly swaying and up-and-down movements,

are instantly transmitted to the spring like structures, always followed by recoil in a direction opposite tothe initial movement and wherein a series of simple or compound movements are produced, the number of which is limited only by the ingenuity of the child.

An important object of the invention is to provide a mild exercising device which is prefectly safe for the child, and which produces a variety of sensations and many hours of enjoyment.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide an amusement and exercising device having a high measure of play value in addition to providing as much or as little exercise, and as rough and as gentle, as the child desires.

A further object of the invention is to provide a spring-like exerciser which can absorb and react to all the different motions in which a child finds pleasure, i.e., jumping, swinging, rolling, swaying, rocking, bending, pushing, pulling, etc. These movements can be transmitted to the resilient structure causing it to flex in a great variety of directions.

In the drawing:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a section taken on line 22 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a side elevation showing a modification.

The embodiment of the invention shown in FIG. 1 includes a helical structure 10 of spring material having about two parallel convolutions 11 at the base which is of sufiicient diameter to impart stability to thecombined amusement and exercising device, considering the fact that motions of the human body are transmitted to the United States Patent 0 upper end. A third convolution 12 may be of only slightly less diameter and the succeeding convolutions or convolution are of progressively less diameter to form a tapered helical structure with the upper convolutions 15 somewhat smaller than the others and supporting a basket of carrier 17, here shown as being of netted construction. Many materials are suitable for this helical structure, among them fiber glass, spring steel and plastic materials. The material may be either solid or tubular.

FIG. 2 shows a short length of the steel wire 11 used in making the spring with a covering 18 of rubber or other resilient material.

The modified contour shown in FIG. 3 is especially adapted for somewhat older children since it has more convolutions and is fairly high relative to its diameter at the base and it provides a feeling of sailing through the air, like the willowy steel poles used by professional performers in exhibitions and circuses. It has a base section .19 of about two parallel convolutions and the top 20 may extend about 1 /2 convolutions. This top ring may have a diameter about /2 that of the base. The number of intermediate convolutions 21 is a matter of choice, 5 being shown. The basket 22, in this instance, is made of nylon net or other fabric and is supported on the top convolution by weaving this top coil through the openings at the top of the net.

The relative dimensions indicated in FIG. 3 are suggestive only and the structure may have any contour or height relative to the base.

If desired, the base section 19 may be clamped to the floor or ground to definitely avoid the possibility of the structure overturning as a result of too vigorous motion being imparted to it.

Good results have been obtained by using a stainless steel tubing and the weight is somewhat less than if A" stainless solid wire is used, but they both give good results. Fiber glass either solid wire or tubing has also proved satisfactory.

While there have been described herein what are at present considered preferred embodiments of the invention, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that many modifications and changes may be made therein without departing from the essence 'of the invention. It is therefore to be understood that the exemplary embodiments are illustrative and not restrictive of the invention, the scope of which is defined in the appended claims, and that all modifications that come within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims are intended to be included therein.

What I claim is:

1. An exercising and amusement device for young persons and including a tapered helical structure formed of spring material and having at least three convolutions, a circular base section formed with about two parallel convolutions and a circular top section with at least one convolution which is generally parallel with the base section, and a receptacle of a size to receive the person, said receptacle being secured to said top section and depending into the tapered helical structure.

2. The structure recited in claim 1 wherein the helical structure is formed from fiber glass.

3. The structure recited in claim 1 wherein the helical structure is formed from springy plastic material.

4. The structure recited in claim 1 wherein the helical structure is formed from spring steel.

5. The structure recited in claim 1 whereinthe helical structure is formed from tubular material.

4 6. The structure recited in claim 1 wherein the helical 2,949,298 8/1960 Speelman 27260 structure has a resilient covering. 3,427,019 2/ 1969 Brown 27257 7. The structure recited in claim 1 wherein the top section has a diameter about /2 that of the base section. FOREIGN PATENTS References Cited 5 650,754 10/1962 Canada.

UNITED STATES PATENTS RICHARD C. P=INKHAM, Primary Examiner 198,923 8/1964 Mitchell 272-57 R. W. DIAZ, Assistant Examiner

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US198923 *Oct 4, 1877Jan 8, 1878P OneImprovement in horseshoes
US2949298 *Nov 3, 1958Aug 16, 1960Speelman Daniel LOscillator
US3427019 *Sep 8, 1964Feb 11, 1969Brown George JSpring-biased jumping device
CA650754A *Oct 23, 1962Robert AdamsJumping device
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Classifications
U.S. Classification482/128
International ClassificationA63B25/00, A63B25/08
Cooperative ClassificationA63B25/08, A63B2208/12
European ClassificationA63B25/08