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Publication numberUS3517953 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 30, 1970
Filing dateJul 18, 1963
Priority dateJul 18, 1963
Publication numberUS 3517953 A, US 3517953A, US-A-3517953, US3517953 A, US3517953A
InventorsBarbee John P, Kucera Clement M, Wright Robert R
Original AssigneeDresser Ind
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Socket retainer for rotary power tools
US 3517953 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June so, 1970 Filed July 18, 1963 R. R. WRIGHT L SOCKET RETAINER FOR ROTARY POWER TOOLS 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 dab/7 'Ba/ ee C/emenf M. f/ucera INVENTORS June 30, 1970 R. R. WRIGHT ETA!- 3,517,953

' socxs'r RETAINER FOR ROTARY POWER TOOLS Filed July 18, 1963 a Sheets-Sheet 2 (/emenf M ffz/cera INVENTORS Afro/ME m R. R. WRIGHT EI'AL 3,517,953

SOCKET RETAINER FOR ROTARY POWER TOOLS June so, 1970 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed July 18, 1963 INVENTORj I BY Unitcd States Patent 3,517,953 SOCKET RETAINER FOR ROTARY POWER TOOLS Robert R. Wright, John P. Barbee, and Clement M.

Kucera, Houston, Tex., assignors, by mesne assignments, to Dresser Industries, Inc., Dallas, Tex.,

a corporation of Delaware Filed July 18, 1963, Ser. No. 295,894 Int. Cl. B60f 27/06 US. Cl. 287-53 11 Claims This invention relates generally to rotary, power operated toolsand more particularly to a retainer for releasably coupling a wrench socket upon a driving shaft.

It is an object of this invention to provide a new and improved retainer for wrench sockets particularly useful in nut runners and impact tools.

Another object is to provide a new and improved device to retain a driven wrench socket on a driving shaft wherein the retainer automatically locks the wrench socket upon the driving shaft as the socket is installed thereon.

Another object of this invention is to provide a new and improved device to retain a driven wrench socket on a splined driving shaft.

A further object is to provide an oscillatable locking device for a splined shaft and socket wherein the locking device is efiective in any selected angular position of the socket member relative to the shaft.

Another object is to provide a retaining device for a rotary tool that is reliable, and simple in construction.

Another object of this invention is to provide a retaining device for a splined drive shaft and a splined socket coupling wherein the end of the drive shaft is accessible through said socket.

Other objects will become apparent from the following description and the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a longitudinal sectional view showing a forward end portion of a rotary tool having a splined driving shaft connected to a socket, and showing the retaining device of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken along lines 22 in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 1 but showing the socket member being installed onto the splined driving shaft.

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken along lines 44 in FIG. 3 but with the socket member removed.

FIG. 5 is a sectional View taken along lines 5-5 in FIG. 3.

FIG. 6 is a detail view of the locking sleeve of the invention.

FIG. 7 is a detail view of the plunger of the invention.

FIG. 8 is a side elevational view of a portion of the splined driving shaft showing indexing splines which may be used.

Referring to the drawings, a preferred form of the invention is illustrated showing a driving shaft 11 which may extend from the front end of a power operated impact wrench or the like (not shown). The driving shaft 11 may have a cylindrical portion 12 which is adapted to be inserted through a bearing for rotation in a tool housing (not shown). The forward portion of the driving shaft 11 is splined to form lands 13 and valleys 14. A socket 15 is shown having internal splines 16 which register with the lands 13 and valleys 14 of the driving shaft 11. The forward ends of the splines 16 may have a beveled portion as shown at 17, and the splines 16 terminate at their inner ends at an annular recess 18. The socket 15 has an opening 19 in the intermediate portion thereof, and the other end of the socket 15 has a socket .20 adapted to drivingly engage a work piece (not shown).

The driving shaft 11 hs a bore 21 extending axially from the end thereof. A second bore 22 extends axially from the bottom of the bore 21. A plunger 23 is inserted within a locking sleeve 24 so that a slot 25 in the plunger 23 registers with a slot 26 in the locking sleeve 24. The locking sleeve 24 has a cam opening 27 in one side thereof. A ball 29 is installed within the opening 27 and in the socket 28. A compression spring 30 is installed within the bore 22. The locking sleeve 24 and the plunger 23 having the ball 29 installed therein as just described, are now inserted within the bores 21 and 22 of the driving shaft 11. The driving shaft 11 has a transverse bore 31 extending therethrough and registering with valleys 14 of the shaft. A retaining pin 32 is installed in the transverse bore 31, through the slot 26 in the locking sleeve 24 and the slot 25 in the plunger 23, after which the pin 32 is staked in place, or secured in the shaft 11 in any other suitable manner.

As may be seen in FIGS. 1, 3 and 5, the slot 25 in the plunger 23 permits limited axial movement of the plunger 23 but does not permit rotation thereof because it is confined rotationally by the pin 32. The slot 26 in the locking sleeve 24 permits limited angular movement of the sleeve 24 but does not permit axial movement thereof because it is confined by the pin 32. In other words, the plunger 23 may move axially back and forth relative to the pin 32 but not rotationally with respect thereto, whereas the locking sleeve 24 may move rotationally to a limited extent with respect to the pin 32 but may not move axially thereof.

As previously described, a ball 29 is inserted into the socket 28 of the plunger 23, and extends into the cam opening 27 in the locking sleeve '24. Thus as the plunger 23 is pushed axially inwardly by means of a screwdriver or the like, which may be inserted through the socket 15, the ball 29 operating within the cam opening 27 causes the locking sleeve to turn to the position shown in FIG. 4 whereby tang portions 33 of the locking sleeve 24 are in angular alignment with some of the lands 13 on the driving shaft 11. As the screwdriver is removed from the plunger, the compression spring 30 urges the plunger forwardly whereupon the action of the ball 29' in the cam opening 27 moves the locking sleeve to the position shown in FIG. 2 whereby the tangs 33 are then angularly aligned with some of the valleys 14 in the driving shaft 11.

If desired, slots or projections may be provided for the locking sleeve 24 in order that the tangs 33 may be turned with a hand tool to the position shown in FIG. 4 to install the socket 15 on the shaft 11, or various other arrangements may be employed whereby the tangs 33 are normally in the position shown in FIG. 2, but may be rotated to the position shown in FIG. 4, in order to couple the socket 15 onto the driving shaft 11.

Referring to FIG. 8, the front portion of the shaft 11 is shown having a pilot portion 34. The pilot portion 34 may have grooves 35 therein to accommodate the oscillatory movement of the locking sleeve tangs 33, as is best seen in FIGS. 2 and 4.

Referring again to FIG. 8, the driving shaft 11 may have land extensions 13a which may be beveled as shown at 36. Thus when the socket 15 is installed on the shaft 11, the extended land portions 13a with the beveled surface 36, automatically index the splines of the socket 15 into registry with the splines of the driving shaft 11. The tangs 33 of the locking sleeve 24 may have bevels 37 thereon so that when the front portion of the socket spline 16 engages the beveled portions 37 of the tangs 33, it rotates the locking sleeve 24 and tangs 33 to the position shown in FIG. 4. After the inner ends 38 of the socket splines 16 have passed or cleared the tanks 33, the compression spring urging the plunger 23 in a forward direction will cause the cam ball 29 to operate in the opening 27 of the sleeve 24 to return it to the position shown in FIG. 2 thereby locking axially the socket on the driving shaft 11 by blocking two of the valleys 14 on the shaft.

If desired, the splined extensions 13a may be dispensed with whereupon the operator may install the socket 15 on the pilot portion 34 of the shaft 11 whereby the splines 16 of the socket 15 engage the tank portions 33 of the locking sleeve 24. The tangs at this time are in the position shown in FIG. 2. The operator then may turn the socket 15 one-half spline pitch distance to the right to line up the tangs 33 with the spline lands 13 of the driving shaft 11 whereupon the socket spline will register with the shaft spline, and the socket may be installed by pushing it axially upon the driving shaft 11. As the inner ends 38 of the socket spline clear axially the tank portions 33, the spring 30 will urge the locking device to the left to actuate the cam to return the locking sleeve and tangs to the position shown in FIG. 2, as previously described.

To remove the socket 15 from the driving shaft 11, the operator inserts a suitable implement such as a screwdriver through the opening 19 and depresses the plunger 23 whereupon the cam action just described will turn the locking sleeve to the position shown in FIG. 4 whereby the tanks 33 are then in angular alignment with the land portions 13 of the driving shaft 11, whereupon the socket 15 may be axially removed from the driving shaft 11.

It is important that a positive retaining device for the socket be provided since tools such as may use the socket and drive assembly of the invention may be used in building structures or the like where it would be dangerous to drop a large socket, and also because of the inconvenience to the operator in having to replace a lost socket. In the arrangement shown, any force tending to remove the socket from the drive shaft 11 Would cause the inner end 38 of the splines of the socket 15 to engage the tangs 33 which are a part of the locking sleeve 24 which is positively locked or prevented from moving in an axial direction by the pin 32. Also, if the socket is moved axially forward, no force component is created which tends to unlock or rotate the retainer device of the invention. Further, if desired, the inner ends 38 of the socket splines need not be beveled but may be square or normal to the axis of the socket in order to insure more positive locking of the socket onto the shaft 11.

It will be apparent that the retainer device of the invention does not have to be aligned with any particular socket spline inasmuch as the retaining device will work with the socket indexed relative thereto in any selected registering position.

It will be appreciated that a retainer device in accordance with the invention may be provided for a socket and shaft coupling wherein the mating portions thereof are not splined but comprise some other type of noncircular cross section for such mating drive.

Thus the device of the invention provides a socket retainer which is simple in construction, reliable and effective in operation, and one which does not require any radial opening in a socket member. Moreover, it permits the socket member to flat axially on the driving shaft without loss of effectiveness of the retainer, and it automatically and securely locks the socket in position when it is installed on the shaft. And further, the retaining device of the invention is one which is easily unlocked so that the socket may be removed from the driving shaft without the necessity of using any special tools.

The invention is not limited to the embodiments shown. Various changes within the scope of the following claims will become apparent to those skilled in the art.

What is claimed is:

1. A coupling comprising a shaft having a splined cross-sectional portion and having a bore open at the front end thereof, a socket member having a splined portion detachably fitting the corresponding splined portion of the shaft, a portion of the front end of the shaft having a recess extending from said bore to the exterior of the shaft, a rotative locking means disposed within said bore, the said locking means comprising a first cylindrical member having a cam means thereon, a second member mounted coaxially on said first member and having cooperating cam means thereon and having a tang extending radially in said recess substantially to the crest diameter of the shaft splines, a spring within said bore arranged to cooperate with said cam means to angularly align the said tang normally with a valley between said shaft splines, the cam means being effective upon rearward axial movement of said first member to rotatably align the tang with a land of said shaft spline, the tang having a forwardly converging tapered surface effective upon being axially engaged by a spline of the socket to angularly move the tang into alignment with a shaft spline land, the socket spline portion having an inner end beyond which the end of the shaft and the tang extend, when the socket is in operating position on the shaft, the said spring and cam means, when the socket is in said operating position, being effective to angularly realign the tang with the shaft spline valley and an inner end of a socket spline land, to prevent withdrawal of the socket from the shaft.

2. A coupling comprising a shaft having a splined portion and having a bore open at the front end thereof, a socket member having a splined portion detachably fitting the corresponding portion of the shaft, the front end of the shaft having a recess extending from said bore to the exterior of the shaft, angularly movable locking means disposed within said bore and having a tang extending radially in said recess substantially to the spline crest diameter of the shaft, the said tang being oscillatable within said recess.

3. A retaining device including a splined driving shaft having an axial bore in the end thereof, a locking sleeve having a cylindrical portion disposed in said bore for limited rotative movement and having a radially extending tang adjacent the end of said splined shaft, said tang adapted to be normally in angular alignment with a valley of said shaft spline, and a plunger disposed in said locking sleeve and adapted for axial movement with respect thereto, means adapted to rotate said locking sleeve to align the tang with a land on said shaft in response to axial inward movement of said plunger by axial movement of a splined socket member engageable with said shaft splines, and resilient means urging said plunger axially forwardly.

4. In a power operated tool, a rotatable shaft having a plurality of longitudinal driving splines for engagement within a driven splined socket member, and having a pilot portion of reduced diameter forward of the splined portion, the said shaft having a recess in its forward end for the reception of a rotative locking device engageable with the inner end of at least one of the driven socket splines, at least one of the shaft splines extending longitudinally forwardly beyond the other splines on said shaft. l l

5. In a power operated tool, a rotatable shaft having a plurality of longitudinally extending driving splines for engagement within a driven splined socket member, and having a pilot portion of reduced diameter forward of the splined portion, said shaft having a rotative locking device engageable with at least one of said socket splines, and means to effect rotative movement of the said locking device.

6. A socket retainer mechanism for a shank and socket having a splined connection with each other when the shank is received in the socket comprising a retainer element across the outer end of said shank,

a rock shaft on which said retainer element is mounted,

said shank having a bore receiving said rock shaft,

said retainer element having teeth at its outer ends aligned with the teeth of said splined connection in one position of said rock shaft and out of alignment therewith in another position thereof, and means operable to rock said rock shaft. 7. A socket retainer mechanism in accordance with claim 6 having means normally biasing said rock shaft to said another position. 8. A socket retainer mechanism in accordance with claim 6 wherein said means is in the form of a slide pin having an operative connection with said rock shaft. 9. A socket retainer mechanism in accordance with claim 8 wherein a spring is provided to normally bias said slide pin to extended position. 10. A socket retainer mechanism in accordance with claim 6 wherein said outer end of said shank has a cross slot receiving said retainer element,

the size of said slot limiting the oscillation of said retainer element to the two positions mentioned.

11. A socket retainer mechanism in accordance with claim 10 wherein 5 said first means is in the form of a slide pin having an operative connection with said rock shaft,

and a spring is provided to extend said slide pin to a position wherein said retainer element occupies said another position.

10 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,167,338 1/l965 Troike 27977XR 15 DAVID J. WILLIAMOWSKY, Primary Examiner A. V. KUNDRAT, Assistant Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3167338 *Oct 18, 1963Jan 26, 1965Aro CorpSocket retainer mechanism
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4606671 *May 16, 1984Aug 19, 1986Danfoss A/SCoupling for connecting a hub and shaft
US4621718 *Nov 29, 1982Nov 11, 1986Stanley WorksRatchet screwdriver
US4953640 *Aug 21, 1989Sep 4, 1990Kurt Ewald HQuick detach bit
US5156483 *Apr 17, 1991Oct 20, 1992Societe Anonyme Dite Hispano SuizaSeal device for hollow shaft
US6116809 *Aug 26, 1998Sep 12, 2000General Motors CorporationRotating assembly with internal retaining ring
US6482094 *Mar 16, 2001Nov 19, 2002Schenck Rotec GmbhSelf-aligning splined male shaft head and engagement method
US7288029 *Jan 19, 2005Oct 30, 2007Gkn Driveline North America, Inc.Propshaft with crash-worthiness
US7398873 *May 4, 2006Jul 15, 2008Keith Manufacturing Co.Releasable connection between members
US7500918 *Mar 29, 2005Mar 10, 2009Mitsuba CorporationShaft member provided with a plurality of ridges on an outer circumferential surface thereof
US8096526Oct 31, 2008Jan 17, 2012Fisher Controls International, LlcRotary actuator lever apparatus having an annular recess
US8206055Oct 26, 2006Jun 26, 2012Deere & CompanyMechanism for securing a shaft-hub connection of two shafts
US20050217338 *Mar 29, 2005Oct 6, 2005Mamoru ZennyojiMethod for forming ridges in a shaft member
US20070261940 *May 4, 2006Nov 15, 2007Foster Raymond KReleasable connection between members
US20090114867 *Nov 7, 2007May 7, 2009Miller Jerry LRotary valve lever apparatus having interchangeable shaft adaptor inserts
US20100108929 *Oct 31, 2008May 6, 2010Wade Jonathon HelferRotary Actuator Lever Apparatus Having an Annular Recess
US20100240464 *Oct 26, 2006Sep 23, 2010Schaefer HelmutMechanism for securing a shaft-hub connection of two shafts
US20150240879 *Feb 24, 2015Aug 27, 2015Ricoh Company, Ltd.Power transmission device and image forming apparatus including same
US20150251731 *Jun 11, 2013Sep 10, 2015Ftl Subsea Ltd.Subsea connector
DE102005052161A1 *Nov 2, 2005May 3, 2007Deere & Company, MolineMechanism for protection of shaft-hub connection of two shafts, has locking element which prevents shaft-hub connection between two shafts from detachment in axial direction
EP1245849A2 *Mar 5, 2002Oct 2, 2002Schenck RoTec GmbHSelf-aligning splined male shaft head and engagement method
EP1245849A3 *Mar 5, 2002Mar 17, 2004Schenck RoTec GmbHSelf-aligning splined male shaft head and engagement method
Classifications
U.S. Classification403/316, 403/343, 403/359.3, 279/77
International ClassificationB25B23/00
Cooperative ClassificationB25B23/0035
European ClassificationB25B23/00A4