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Publication numberUS3519000 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 7, 1970
Filing dateMay 6, 1968
Priority dateMay 6, 1968
Publication numberUS 3519000 A, US 3519000A, US-A-3519000, US3519000 A, US3519000A
InventorsHouser Roy W
Original AssigneeHouser Roy W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vented cigarette holder
US 3519000 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jul 7, 1970 R. -W. HOUSER VENTED CIGARETTE HOLDER Filed May 6, 195

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,ZV W I United States Patent Office 3,519,000 Patented July 7,, 1970 U.S. Cl. 131-198 3 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A vented cigarette holder and an air-to-smoke ratio control valve therefor and comprises a four part structure including a cigarette holding cup at its forward end, an air-to-smoke ratio control valve which consists of two parts, one a valve body and the other a combination valve head and valve stem, and a stem and bit member. The valve body is located between the cup and the bit and comprises a hollow substantially cylindrical member having slots at the downstream end, the interior havlng a relatively large circular bore at opposite ends and a relatively smaller bore therebetween, the bore at the upstream end being longer than that at the downstream end. A pair of colinear grooves is provided in the internal wall at opposite ends of the small bore portion. The downstream end of the valve head is cylindrical and fits into a similar recess in the upstream end of the bit and has a generally similar upstream end which is rotatable in the smaller bore portion of the body. The head has a semi-cylindrical notch in the intermediate portion of the upstream end portion, defined by parallel radial walls that are inclined relative to the longitudinal axis thereof, positioned adjacent each of the grooves so that rotation of the head will adjust the size of the smoke passage and the air admitting passage to the same degree, the smoke passing from the cup to the upstream large bore, through the upstream groove into the notched portion of the head where it mixes with air passing through slots in the body, and through the groove in the downstream end. The middle portion of the head and the bit have passages permitting air and smoke to be drawn from the notched portion, through the downstream end of the bit.

This invention relates to improvements in devices for facilitating the smoking of cigarettes. In particular, it relates to a cigarette holder which is vented in the sense that provision is made for mixing ambient air with the cigarette smoke.

The invention is applicable to the smoking of cigarettes, cigars, and other forms of tobacco packaged such that smoke must traverse the length of the package in response to inhalation suction at one end. The cigarette is the most common of these several forms and its name is used herein to designate all of those several forms.

An object of the invention is to provide an inexpensive, easily cleaned device for mixing air with cigarette smoke in response to inhalation. Another object of the invention is to provide an improved vented cigarette holder in which the ratio of air to smoke is easily adjusted.

Another object of the invention is to provide a cigarette holding device in which air and smoke are thoroughly mixed at any desired air-to-smoke ratio whereby to make adjustable the coolness of the smoke and to insure uniformity in successive inhalations.

Another object is to provide a vented cigarette holder useful for those who want to reduce the relative quantity of smoke inhalation or who are attempting to overcome the smoking habit.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention will be readily apparent from the following detailed description of a preferred form of the invention; it being understood, however, that this invention is not limited to the particular embodiment and modification illustrated but that other modifications and embodiments are possible Within the spirit of the invention and the scope of the appended claims.

Referring to the drawings, wherein like reference characters refer to like parts:

FIG. 1 is a view in side elevation of a vented cigarette holder embodying the invention together with a fragment of a cigarette installed in the holder;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view, taken on line 22 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of a fragment of the cigarette holder of FIGS. 1 and 2, taken on line 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a transverse cross-sectional view, taken on line 44 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a transverse cross-sectional view, taken on line 5-5 of FIG. 2; and

FIG. 6 is a transverse cross-sectional view, taken on line 66 of FIG. 2.

Referring to FIG. 1 of the drawing, the cigarette holder 10, comprises a generally cylindrical, elongate structure consisting of four sections. The foremost section is called the cup 12 and its function is to retain the end of a cigarette or other tobacco package the other end of which is to be ignited, and the smoke from which is to enter the cup end of the holder, traverse the length of the holder and emerge at the bit 14 at the rearward end of the holder in response to inhalation suction. The bit 14 is formed at the rearward end of the holder stem 16. Two sections designated 18 and 20, respectively, are interposed between the cup end and the stem 16 and together comprise the air-to-smoke ratio control valve 22 of the cigarette holder. Section 18 is the valve body. Section 20 is the stem of the valve and it is attached to a valve head not visible in FIG. 1. The body 18 of the valve is rotatable relative to the valve stem 20 to alter the degree in which smoke from the cigarette 24 and ambient air are mixed in a mixing chamber within the valve 22. An

The cigarette cup 12 is symmetrical about its central taxis. As best shown in FIGS. 2 and 3 it is provided with an axial opening which has a diameter to receive the end of a cigarette press-fitted within the bore. The forward end of the cup bore is enlarged as by chamfering to facilitate insertion of the cigarette. At the rearward end of the cup the diameter of the bore is reduced to form a shoulder against which the rearward end of the cigarette is seated so that the degree of its insertion is limited. The rearward portion of the cup 12 has a reduced outer diameter permitting it to be press-fitted within the forward recess 30 at the inlet or upstream end of the valve body 18.

The valve body 18 is generally cylindrical in shape although in the preferred form of the invention selected for illustration in the drawing its outer diameter is tapered slightly to a reduced diameter at its rearward or downstream end whereby to enhance the appearance of the completed holder. However, while the shape is that of a truncated cone the shape is nonetheless generally cylind-rical. The body is formed with a central bore extending along its axis throughout its entire length. At the forwardmost section of the length of the valve body the bore has an increased inside diameter to form the recess 30 in which the cup '12 is disposed. A valve head 32 is disposed within the bore of the body along an intermediate section of its length. This section 34, has a uniform inside diameter throughout its length. The central bore has an increased diameter at the rearmost section 36 of the body.

Means are provided in the invention for introducing ambient air and smoke from the cigarette into the region of the body defined by section 34 so that the smoke and air may mix in the bore of the valve body in this intermediate region. In the preferred form of the invention this means comprises conformations in the walls of the valve body defining passageways opening to the bore of the body in this central region and affording communication from the bore of the body at a forward section to the bore at the intermediate section of the body. The other opening communicates with the atmosphere surrounding the holder and constitutes the inlet for air. In the preferred form of the invention selected for illustration in the drawings, this means, and these conformations, comprise colinear grooves formed lengthwise of the valve body on its inner surface. One groove 39 a wall of which is visible in FIG. 2 and is designated 38, extends from the central section 34 of the valve body to a section 40 of the valve body defined by the length of the body between the forward recess 30 and the central region 34. Here the bore 42 of the body has a diameter greater than the diameter of the bore in the mid-area 34 but less than the diameter of the recess 30. The other slot 44 extends rearwardly from the central region 34 of the valve body and opens into the rearmost section 36 of the body where the bore has an increased diameter. This rear slot is designated 44 and is visible in FIGS. 2, and 6. As best shown in FIG. 6, a portion of the section 36 are cut away to form inlet passages 46 by which air may enter the central bore of the body and flow from there through the slot 44.

A valve head is provided in the invention and it is disposed within the valve body at the central region 34 along the length of the body. The head is rotatable relative to the valve body on the central axis thereof. The function of the valve head is to open and close in varying degrees the slots 39 and 44. To this end the valve head is provided with cutouts which define surface which are effective to open or close the smoke and air inlet openings in a degree dependent upon rotation of the valve head. The cutout is formed so that helical surfaces are defined when adjacent each of the inlet openings. In the embodiment selected or illustration, the cutout in the valve head has the form of a notch which extends substantially half way through the head in the cross-sectional direction. The walls of the notch extend transversely of the head, that is substantially at right angles to the axis of the head except that they are inclined to the transverse direction to form the helical surfaces. The diameter of the head is great enough to provide a sliding fit with the interior wall of the intermediate section of the valve body.

In FIG. 3 of the drawing, the reference 50 designates the wall that defines the bottom of the notch. The forward wall 52 of the notch is visible in FIG. 4 and the rearward wall 54 of the notch is seen in FIG. 5. Returning to FIG. 3, the helical surface which cooperates with the air inlet passage 44 is designated 56 and comprises the radial outer surface of the valve head just rearwardly of the notch. The helical surface that cooperates with the passageway 38 to open and close the smoke inlet passage comprises the radial outer surface of the valve head forward of the notch and is designated 58 in the drawing. These two surfaces 56 and 58 are helical in the sense that the edges of these surfaces at the notch describe a segment of a helix about the central axis of the head.

The valve stem 20 is formed integrally with the valve head in this embodiment. It is generally cylindrical in shape, although tapered for esthestic purposes as is the valve body 18, and it is disposed at the rear end of the valve body 18. Means are provided for attaching the holder stem 16 to the valve stem. Any suitable means may be employed. In the embodiment selected for illustration the valve stem 20 is provided with a rear- Wardly extending tail portion 60 of reduced diameter. The forward end of the stem 60 is provided with a cylindrical recess of size to accommodate the tail piece 60. The tail piece is integrally formed with the valve stem 20 and the latter is provided with an annular recess at its juncture with the tail piece to accommodate the extreme forward end 62 of the holder stem 16. The f0rward recess of the bit communicates with an opening which is circular and extends rearwardly to the shoulder 64 and from that point rearwardly is tapered to have an increased diameter at the rearward end of the bit. Comparison of FIGS. 1 and 2 shows that the stem tapers down toward the bit end in one plane but is flared so that it becomes wider at the bit in a perpendicular plane. The passageway through the stem communicates with a passageway that extends through the tail piece 60, through the valve stem 20 and through the rearmost portion of the head 32 to an opening at the rear face 54 of the valve head notch. This opening is designated by the reference numeral 70.

In operation of the invention, the end of a cigarette, cigar, or other tobacco package, is inserted in the forward cup 12 and its other end is ignited. The bit 14 is placed in the smokers mouth and when he inhales to apply inhalation suction at the passageway through the stem 16, smoke is drawn through the cigarette, through the axial opening at the rearward end of the cup 12 into the opening 42 just forwardly of the central section of the valve body. The smoke then flows through the slot 39 which opens, at its rearward end, into the slot formed in the valve head. The size of the opening into the valve head slot is determined by the rotational position of the valve head. Simultaneously, air is drawn through the inlet passages 46 (see FIG. 6) to flow through the flowpath formed in valve body section 36 around the rearmost portion of the valve head to the slot 44. This passageway is defined, as shown by comparison of FIGS. 2 and 6, by the forward wall of the valve stem 20 and the rearward Wall of the intermediate section 34 of the valve body. Air flows through passageway 44 to the opening of the passage into the slot of the valve head. The quantity of air drawn in through slot 44 is determined by the rotational position of the valve head which determines the degree in which the opening of slot 44 is closed by the helical surface 56. The rear edge of slot 38 and the forward edge of slot 44 are spaced a substantial distance apart so that the cavity formed in the valve head is relatively long and so that the mixing chamber formed by this cavity has a substantial cross-sectional area and volume compared to the cross-sectional area and volume of the slots 38 and 44. The air and smoke are thoroughly mixed in that valve head slot or cavity and the mixture is withdrawn from the slot through the relatively small hole 70 which communicates with the passageway in the holder stem 16. To adjust the size of the entrance openings from slots 38 and 44 into the mixing cavity or mixing chamber of the valve head, the valve body is grasped with the fingers of one hand and the valve stem 20 is grasped by the fingers of the other hand and these two parts of the valve are rotated one with respect to the other in a way that insures that the valve stem is seated up against the end of the valve body as shown in the drawings. In FIG. 1 the valve stem 20 has been rotated relative to the valve body 22 such that the index 26 is aligned with the valve body graduation of medium length. In this position the size of the opening from passageway or slot 38 into the slot of the valve head has the same size as the opening from passageway or slot 44 into the slot of the valve head. The valve head slot has a width relative to the spacing between the rearward end of slot 39 and the forward end of slot 44 such that in this rotational position of the valve head the helix surfaces 56 and 58 uncover equal areas of the slots. In the preferred form of the invention the end walls 52 and 54 of the slot are inclined to the transverse direction across the valve head at the same angle and are parallel. Consequently, clockwise rotation of the valve head relative to the valve body as viewed in FIG. 4 results in closure of the smoke inlet and opening of the air inlet. Conversely, counterclockwise rotation of the valve head relative to the valve body as viewed in FIG. 4 results in opening of the smoke inlet and closure of the air inlet. At the extremes of valve head rotation the respective ones of the inlet openings are completely closed and the other is completely open.

The structural arrangement of the embodiment shown lends itself to construction of the nonsymmetrical elements, particularly the valve body and the stem, of plastic material. To avoid its being injured by failure to remove a burning cigarette end, the cup 12 is made of metal such for example as aluminum. This cup member is entirely symmetrical and is readily made by screw machines or other high production machinery. The valve head and stem combination is not entirely symmetrical although it is sufiiciently symmetrical so that most of the machining may be done with a screw machine or similar device. Accordingly, in the preferred form of the invention this element is made of aluminum which, in combination with the plastic of the valve body, provides an easily adjusted and easily cleaned structure in which the possibility of seizing between the valve head and the valve body is minimized notwithstanding that the valve head has a diameter to form a sliding fit within the inner wall of the valve 'body.

Although I have shown and described certain specific embodiments of my invention, I am fully aware that many modifications thereof are possible.

I claim:

1. In a vented cigarette holder an air-to-srnoke ratio control valve comprising:

a tubular valve body formed with an axial =bore from an upstream to a downstream end; and

a valve head disposed within the bore and rotatable therein; the valve body having means defining a pair of passageways opening to the bore of said body at spaced points therealong by which air and smoke, respectively, may be conveyed to said bore, said head having dimensions to seal said bore and having a cutout formed therein and defined by spaced walls which are similarly inclined relative to a direct transverse to the axis of head rotation, said head being effective to open and close said passageways respectively as an incident to rotation of said head, one of said passageways communicating with a portion of the bore upstream of the head, the other passageway communicating with the exterior of said body, and said valve head having means formed therein defining an outlet passageway aifording communication from said out out to the exterior of said valve head.

2. The invention defined in claim 1, in which said valve body is cylindrical in shape and said bore has a uniform diameter extending along an intermediate section of its length and a relatively increased diameter over a region of its length extending from said intermediate section to the upstream end of said body and having a relatively increased diameter over a region of its length at the downstream end of said body, said passageways opening at the interior wall of said body comprising means providing a pair of slots formed on the inner wall of said body and extending one from the region of increased diameter at said upstream end of said body into said intermediate section and the other extending from said region of increased diameter at the downstream end of said body to a point in the intermediate section of said body.

3. The invention defined in claim 2, in which said cut out of the valve head comprises means providing a notch located substantially mid-way of and extending across said head in its cross-sectional direction to define a chamber said chamber having an outlet passage extending axially of said head in the direction of said downstream end of said valve body.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,189,684 2/ 1940 Sprinkel. 2,701,571 2/ 1955 Dittrich. 2,951,486 9/1960 Walters. 2,967,528 1/ 1961 Kelter. 3,196,88 1 7/ 1965 Walters.

FOREIGN PATENTS 1,117,343 11/1961 Germany.

JOSEPH S. REICH, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 131-215

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2189684 *Nov 5, 1938Feb 6, 1940Gordon Sprinkel HenrySmoke cooling device
US2701571 *Jun 8, 1953Feb 8, 1955Dittrich Walter ADevice for smoking cigarettes
US2951486 *Oct 26, 1959Sep 6, 1960Walters Harry ECigarette holder
US2967528 *Mar 12, 1959Jan 10, 1961Falmouth Pharmaceuticals LtdDevice for ending habit of smoking
US3196881 *May 11, 1964Jul 27, 1965Walters Harry ECigarette holder
DE1117343B *Jul 4, 1958Nov 16, 1961Josef BoeckmannRauchmittelmundstueck
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3674037 *Nov 9, 1970Jul 4, 1972Fortune William SSmoking habit-breaking aid apparatus
US4526183 *Feb 22, 1984Jul 2, 1985Philip Morris IncorporatedFilter cigarette
US4527573 *Nov 5, 1982Jul 9, 1985Philip Morris IncorporatedFilter cigarette
US4532943 *Sep 30, 1982Aug 6, 1985Philip Morris IncorporatedAdjustable filter cigarette
US4570649 *Feb 22, 1984Feb 18, 1986Philip Morris IncorporatedFilter cigarette
US4596258 *May 18, 1984Jun 24, 1986Steiner Pierre GSmoking devices
US4649944 *Aug 14, 1984Mar 17, 1987Philip Morris IncorporatedFilter cigarette
US20110232663 *Mar 24, 2011Sep 29, 2011Alen KadiricFilter cigarette with variable ventilation
EP2368448A1 *Mar 26, 2010Sep 28, 2011Philip Morris Products S.A.Smoking article with variable ventilation
WO2011116976A1Mar 25, 2011Sep 29, 2011Philip Morris Products S.A.Filter cigarette with variable ventilation
WO2013050934A1 *Oct 3, 2012Apr 11, 2013Sis Resources Ltd.Smoking system
Classifications
U.S. Classification131/198.2, 131/215.3
International ClassificationA62C13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA62C13/003
European ClassificationA62C13/00B