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Publication numberUS3519194 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 7, 1970
Filing dateJul 7, 1969
Priority dateJul 7, 1969
Publication numberUS 3519194 A, US 3519194A, US-A-3519194, US3519194 A, US3519194A
InventorsKohlhaas Frank A, Weiss Frederic S
Original AssigneeCrown Zellerbach Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
End-loading easy-opening shipping carton
US 3519194 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 7, 1970 F. A. KOHLHAAS EPA!- 3,519,194

END-LOADING EASY-OPENING SHIPPING CARTON Filed July 7, 1969 S Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. Frank A. Komhaas Frederic S. Weiss Attorneg .Fufly 7, 1979 KQHLHAASA ETAL 3,519,194

END-LOADING EASY-OPENING SHIPPING CARTON Filed July 7, 1969 5 SheetsSheet 3 INVENTOR. FRANK A. KOHLHAAS BY FREDERIC S. WEISS ATTORNEY United States Patent O Int. Cl. B65d US. Cl. 229-51 ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A regular slotted shipping carton adapted for endloading and top-opening. The manufactures seal is made along the connection between the top panel and a' side wall panel. The top wall closure flaps are free of adhesive connection with said front and rear walfclosure flaps so that the top wall panel may be readily removed when the manufacturers seal is broken. Openings are provided between the front and rear wall closure flaps for easy access to the goods packaged in the carton when the top wall panel is removed.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The invention is a continuation-in-part of our patent application Ser. No. 710,302 filed Mar. 4, 1968 now abandoned, and relates to a regular slotted shippingcarton provided with end-loading and top-opening features. The outer free edges of the front top wall panels of the carton abut and are connected by the manufacturers joint. The novel end closure includes top wall flaps free of connection with other closure flaps but maintained in place by contact with the inner surface of the front and rear wall flaps which are adhesively connected to the bottom wall flaps. Since the top wall closure flaps are not adhesively connected to the adjacent closure flaps, the top wall panel and the top wall closure flaps may be removed by breaking the manufacturers seal and pivoting the top wall panel about its hinged connection with the rear wall panel. Ready access to the goods packaged in the carton is had through openings provided between the front and rear wall closure flaps.

In the past, one of the thorniest problems manufacturers of soap powders, dry cereal, etc., faced was that of grocery clerks cutting through the product packages as they knifed into the shipping carton. Such manufacturers often honor demands from grocery retailers to replace the products damaged in this manner. Such dam age often runs as high as of the manufacturers selling price and greatly depletes any profit in the sale. One embodiment of this invention provides such manufacturers with an end-loading, top-opening shipping carton which will dispense with the necessity and inclination of grocery clerks to use knives for opening the carton and another embodiment provides protection for the goods as a glue panel is severed in order to gain entry to the carton thus providing both manufacturers and the store owners with the attendant savings.

There have been various attempts at solutions to this problem in the past, however, the prior art cartons of which applicants are aware, involve irregular carton blanks and require special equipment for handling.

7' Claims 3,519,194 Patented July 7, 1970 addition to a special glue pattern on the closure flaps.

The instant invention relates only to a shipping carton made from a regular slotted carton blank. The manner in which the end closure is effected provides a new and unusual result in that a regular slotted carton may be quickly and easily opened without fear of cutting the product packages.

Accordingly, because this invention involves a regular slotted carton blank, it may be handled by any conventional case loading and sealing equipment adapted for regular slotted cartons.

Further, since grocery clerks need not guess which end of the carton to open, as with conventional cartons, the tops of the product packages are always exposed for marking once the top panel of the shipping carton is removed.

The End-Loading, Display Tray-Forming Shipping Additionally, easy access to the product packages is gained when the top wall closure flaps have been removed, thus dispensing with the problem of getting a grip on and removing the first of the tightly packed product 1 packages.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a plan view of the outside face of a foldable blank from which the embodiment of the carton of FIGS. 1-6 is formed.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary perspective view of the blank of FIG. 1 erected to a tubular configuration and ready to be loaded.

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary perspective view depicting the first step of closing the embodiment of FIGS. 1-6.

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary perspective view of the carton of FIG. 3 in a sealed condition and the initial opening step of breaking the tear-strip seal.

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary perspective view of the carton with the tear-strip seal completely broken and the top wall panel being pivoted about its rear edge during the opening process.

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary perspective view of the embodiment of FIGS. 3-5 with a modified closure flap pattern.

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary plan view of a foldable blank from which the alternate embodiment of FIGS. 7-11 is formed.

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary perspective view of the blank of FIG. 7 erected to a tubular configuration and ready to be loaded.

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary perspective view of the carton of FIGS. 7-11 after the manufacturers seal has been broken and the top panel partially lifted.

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary end elevation view of the carton in the area of the manufacturers seal.

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary end elevation view similar to FIG. 10 after the manufacturers seal has been severed and the top wall panel partially lifted.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF INVENTION Referring now to the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1-6 of the drawing wherein like reference numerals refer to like components in the various views, the carton blank generally designated by reference numeral 20 as shown in FIG. 1 includes top wall panel 21, rear wall panel 22, bottom wall panel 23 and front wall panel 24 foldably connected in series relation by lines of scoring 26-28 inclusive.

Line of scoring 26 connecting the top wall panel to the rear wall panel is shown as a perforated score, however, such line of scoring need not be perforated as will be hereinafter explained. The end edges of the various wall panels are determined by flap scores 29 and 30 which serve as the hinge connection for the end closure flaps. Reference numerals 41 and 42 designate the top wall closure flaps, 43 and 44 the rear wall closure flaps, 45 and 46 the bottom wall closure flaps, and 47 and 48 the front wall closure flaps. As with all regular slotted cartons, each of the flaps are of equal width. The outer free edges of the top and front wall panels serve as the outer extremities of the carton blank and have been designated by reference numerals 31 and 32, respectively. Reference numeral 33 refers to glue areas in rear wall closure flaps 43 and 44 and reference numeral 34 refers to glue areas in the front wall closure flaps 47 and 48. The significance of glue areas 33 and 34 will be hereinafter explained.

Top wall closure fiaps 41 and 42 are provided with cutouts 35 also for a reason to be hereinafter explained.

FIGS. 2-5 depict the carton in progressive stages of erection, closing and opening. Since the invention relates to a carton having identical closures at each end which are easily closed and opened, the description shall follow the chronological stages of closing and opening one end only.

Referring now to FIG. 2, the carton has been folded into a tubular configuration with outer free edge 31 of top wall panel 21 in an abutting relation with outer free edge 32 of front wall panel 24 and secured thereto by a tear-strip tape designated generally as 50. Tear-strip tape 50 comprises adhesive backing 51 and a heavy tear string 52. Tear-strip tape of this type is generally known and is preferred, however, it is conceived other easyopening seals may be substituted therefore.

As will be noted from FIG. 2, glue areas 33 and 34 extend over approximately the lower 50% of the front and rear wall closure flaps 43 and 47.

With the container in the tubular configuration as shown in FIG. 2, it is in the proper configuration for end-loading.

Once the product has been loaded in the carton, the end closure of the embodiment of FIGS. 3-5 is affected by first folding the top and bottom wall closure flaps 41 and 45 to a closed position as shown in FIG. 3. When the top and bottom wall closure flaps 41 and 45 have been infolded glue is applied to glue areas 34 and 33 on front and rear wall closure flaps 47 and 43 respectively. Although applicants prefer to apply glue to flaps 47 and 43, it may be applied to bottom wall flap 45 with similar results. Front and rear wall closure flaps 47 and 43 are then infolded to the position shown in FIG. 4, and pressure is applied to affect a firm adhesive connection between bottom wall flap 45 and the front and rear wall flaps. It will be noted that the top wall flap 41 is free of any adhesive connection with the adjacent front and rear wall closure flaps.

With the container in the loaded and sealed position as shown in FIG. 4, the container is ready to be shipped or stored. For shipping and stacking purposes the carton has all the attributes of a regular slotted carton, the front and rear wall closure flaps provide a vertical column for stacking strength as does the vertically aligned top and bottom wall closure flaps.

Once the carton reaches its destination, it may be quickly and easily opened. The grocery clerk merely grasps the end of tear-string 52 and pulls outwardly as shown in FIG. 4, thus breaking tape 51. Because top wall flap 41 is not connected to either of the adjacent closure flaps, the top wall panel 21 may be readily removed by lifting its outer free edge 31 (see FIG. thus pivoting top wall panel 21 about perforated score connection 26.

Cut-out 35 has been provided in the front edge of the top wall closure flaps to prevent the flaps from binding against the front wall panel as the top wall panel is pivoted about hinged connection 26. Cut-out 35 may be of any configuration, for example the angular configuration of FIGS. 7-11, as long as enough material is removed from the front edge of the flaps to prevent binding. The cut-out must not, however, extend beyond the 4 outer free edge 64 (FIG. 5) of flap 47 as the product packages would be exposed.

If desired, the top wall panel may be completely removed from the carton by tearing along perforated score connection 26. This is however, unnecessary to the price marking and removal of the product packages from the carton and therefore optional.

As will be noted in FIG. 5, the product packages 66 are exposed and readily available when the top wall panel is removed. This enables the manufacturer to place his product packages in the shipping carton such that the tops of the packages are exposed and thus, may be easily price marked by a grocery clerk before the product packages are removed from the shipping carton.

It will also be seen that once the top wall panel and the top wall closure flap have been removed from the carton, access to the goods may be readily gained through the opening designated by reference numeral 60 between the outer free edges of the front and rear wall closure flaps. This relieves the preexisting difficulty of removing the first product package from a tightly packed shipping container when only one wall panel has been removed. Because the top wall flaps are also removed with the top wall panel, a grocery clerk may readily grip product packages in access opening 60 thus easily removing the packages. It is preferable that the distance between the outer free edges of the front and rear wall closure flaps be about 2" to allow one to grasp the product packages but this dimension is not critical.

FIG. 6 depicts a modificaion of the embodiment of FIGS. 1-5 in a view similar to that of FIG. 4. This modification, however, comprises an end closure whereby bottom wall flap 45 is adhered to the outer surface of front and rear wall closure flaps 47 and 43 instead of the inner surface as in the carton shown in FIG. 4. As in the carton of FIG. 4, however, top wall flap 41 is adjacent the inner face of the front and rear wall closure flaps 47 and 43.

In the construction of the modification of FIG. 6 as well as the carton of FIG. 4, glue may be applied to either the bottom wall flap or the front and rear wall flaps to effect the adhesive seal.

FIGS. 7-11 depict an alternative embodiment of the invention whereby the tear-strip tape seal of the embodiment of FIGS. l6 has been replaced by a glue flap hingedly connected to the outer free edge of the top wall panel. The glue flap is adhesively connected along a substantial portion of its inner surface to the adjacent front wall panel, however, there is a glue-free area immediately above the adhesive connection such that the glue flap may be severed thus providing entry to the carton. The adjacent front wall panel protects the packaged goods from the severing instrument as the glue flap is being severed.

It will be noted that the reference numerals of this embodiment correspond to the reference numerals of the embodiment of FIGS. 1-6 and their associated components except that the reference numerals of this embodiment are of the series.

Referring now to FIG. 7, a portion of the blank of the alternative embodiment is shown and it includes top wall panel 121, top wall flaps 141 and 142. Glue flap 171 is hingedly connected to front wall panel 121 by line of scoring 131. The inner surface of glue flap 171 includes glue area 173 and glue-free area 174 between the glue area and the hinge connection 131.

FIG. 8 shows the blank of FIG. 7 in a tubular configuration with glue flap 171 adhesively connected to the front wall panel thus providing the manufacturers seal for the container.

FIG. 10 further illustrates the manufacturers seal with glue flap 171 adhesively connected to the front wall panel in area of adhesive connection 173 and the glue-free area 174.

FIG. 9 depicts the closure flap pattern of this embodiment which is identical to that of FIG. 6, explained above. Further, FIG. 9 shows how the top panel may be removed in a manner similar to that of FIG. once the glue flap 171 has been severed adjacent glue-free area 174. FIG. 11 further illustrates this feature showing glue flap 171 severed above the area of adhesive connection 173 which remains intact as the top panel is removed.

Since it is only necessary to sever glue flap 171 to gain entry to the carton, a very shallow cut will suffice and the goods are protected from the severing instrument by the front wall panel 124.

From the foregoing it will be apparent that the object of the invention heretofore enumerated and others have been accomplished in that there has been provided a novel and improved end-loading, top-opening, shipping carton adapted to be loaded and sealed by conventional equipment, the carton having the attendant advantages of a regulator slotted carton in closed condition and adapted for easy-opening and access to the carton contents. The invention is not limited to the carton shown, as it is our intention to cover hereby all adaptions and modifications thereof which come within the practice of those skilled in the art to which the invention relates. Having thus described our invention, we claim:

1. A paperboard shipping carton, comprising:

(a) top, rear, bottom and front wall panels hingedly connected in series relation;

(b) easy-opening means connecting said top and front wall panels;

(c) closure flaps of equal width hingedly connected to each end of each of said wall panels;

(d) said top and bottom wall closure flaps lying in substantially the same plane;

(e) said front and rear wall closure flaps adhesively connected to said bottom wall closure flaps;

(f) said top wall closure flap lying adjacent the inner surface of said front and rear wall closure flaps and free of adhesive connection therewith, such that said top wall panel may be pivoted about its hinge connection with said rear wall panel when said easyopening connection is broken;

(g) cut-outs in the front portion of said top wall closure flaps whereby said top wall closure flaps will not bind against said front wall panel as said top wall panel is pivoted about its connection with said rear wall panel; and

(h) access openings between the outer free edges of said front and rear wall closure flaps of said shipping carton whereby easy access to the interior of said carton is gained when said top wall panel of said shipping carton is removed.

2. The paperboard shipping carton of claim 1, wherein the hinged connection between said top and rear wall panels comprises a perforated score providing easy removal of said top wall panel from said rear wall panel.

3. The corrugated paperboard shipping carton of claim 1 wherein said front and rear wall closure flaps are connected to the inner surface of said bottom wall closure flap.

4. A loaded corrugated paperboard shipping carton, comprising:

(a) top, rear, bottom and front wall panels hingedly connected in series relation;

(b) easy-opening means connecting said top and rear wall panels;

(c) closure flaps of equal width hingedly connected to each end of each of said wall panels;

((1) said top and bottom wall closure flaps lying in substantially the same plane;

(e) the front and rear wall closure flaps adhesively connected to the bottom wall closure flap;

(f) the top wall closure flap lying adjacent the inner surface of said front and rear Wall closure flaps and free of adhesive connection therewith, such that said top wall panel may be pivoted about its hinge connection with said rear wall panel when said easy-opening connection is broken;

(g) cut-outs in the front portions of said top wall closure flaps whereby said top wall closure flaps will not bind against said front wall panel as said top wall panel is pivoted about its connection with said rear wall panel;

(h) easily destructible product packages in said shipping carton arranged with their top ends adjacent said top wall panel of said shipping carton whereby the top ends of said product packages may be easily price marked when the top wall panel of said shipping carton is removed; and

(i) access openings between the outer free edges of said front and rear wall closure flaps of said shipping carton whereby easy access to said product packages is gained when said top wall panel of said shipping carton is removed.

5. A paperboard shipping carton, comprising:

(a) top, rear, bottom and front wall panels hingedly connected in series relation;

(b) means connecting said top and front wall panels;

(c) closure flaps of equal width hingedly connected to each end of each of said wall panels;

((1) said top and bottom wall closure flaps lying in substantially the same plane;

(e) said front and rear wall closure flaps adhesively connected to said bottom wall closure flap;

(f) said top wall closure flap lying adjacent the inner surface of said front and rear wall closure flaps and free of adhesive connection therewith, such that said top wall panel may be pivoted about its hinge connection with said rear wall panel when said means connecting the front and top wall panels is broken; and

(g) access openings between the outer free edges of said front and rear wall closure flaps of said shipping carton whereby easy access to the interior thereof is gained when said top wall panel is removed.

6. The paperboard shipping carton of claim 5, wherein said means connecting said front and top wall panels comprises a glue flap hingedly connected to the outer free edge of said top wall panel and adhesively connected to said front wall panel in an area of adhesion extending over the lower portion of its surface, said glue panel being free of adhesive connection with said front wall panel over a substantial portion of its surface immediately below its hinged connection with said top wall panel such that the carton may be opened by severing the glue panel in the adhesive free area.

7. The paperboard shipping carton of claim 6, further comprising cut-outs in the front portion of said top wall closure flaps whereby said top wall closure flaps will not bind against said front wall panel as said top wall panel is pivoted about its connection with said rear wall panel.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,143,646 1/1939 Chapman 22937 X 2,218,509 10/ 1940 Goodyear.

2,708,545 5/1955 Seith 22937 X 3,143,274 8/1964 Maize 22937 X 3,270,946 9/1966 Redpath et al.

3,344,976 10/1967 Mason 22937 X 3,372,794 3/1968 Kohlhaas 20644 DAVIS T. MOORHEAD, Primary Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R. 229-37

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2143646 *Apr 15, 1937Jan 10, 1939Frederick H ColeContainer
US2218509 *Mar 4, 1938Oct 22, 1940Fibreboard Products IncCarton
US2708545 *Jan 3, 1950May 17, 1955Cornell Paperboard Products CoEnd-closing, top-opening shipping container
US3143274 *Nov 1, 1962Aug 4, 1964Gen ElectricFluorescent lamp carton
US3270946 *Apr 13, 1964Sep 6, 1966Waldorf Paper Prod CoIce cream carton
US3344976 *Aug 30, 1966Oct 3, 1967Cameo Container CorpPaperboard container with pull-out side
US3372794 *Jan 16, 1967Mar 12, 1968Crown Zellerbach CorpEnd-loading display tray forming shipping carton
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3941303 *Feb 27, 1975Mar 2, 1976The Quaker Oats CompanyShipping case
US3958746 *Feb 27, 1975May 25, 1976The Quaker Oats CompanySpecial shipping case for elimination of cut container contents
US3979046 *Feb 27, 1975Sep 7, 1976The Quaker Oats CompanySpecial shipping case having modified end flaps
US4784271 *Nov 20, 1987Nov 15, 1988The Procter & Gamble CompanyTear strip openable shipping/display container with butt joint
US4871345 *Aug 1, 1988Oct 3, 1989The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of making tear strip openable shipping/display container and blanks therefor
US5249681 *Jan 13, 1992Oct 5, 1993The C. W. Zumbiel Co.Carton dispenser system
US5533667 *Sep 22, 1995Jul 9, 1996Perf-PakSeparable modular containers
US6981632 *Feb 25, 2003Jan 3, 2006Weyerhaeuser CompanyDisplay box
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/121, 229/122, 229/152, 229/123.2, 229/204, 229/240, 229/154
International ClassificationB65D5/54
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/5435
European ClassificationB65D5/54B3C
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 5, 1988AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: GAYLORD CONTAINER CORPORATION
Effective date: 19861117
Owner name: GAYLORD CONTAINER LIMITED
Aug 5, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: GAYLORD CONTAINER CORPORATION
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:GC ACQUISITION CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004941/0061
Effective date: 19861203
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:GAYLORD CONTAINER LIMITED;REEL/FRAME:004941/0056
Effective date: 19861117
Jul 21, 1988AS06Security interest
Owner name: BANKERS TRUST COMPANY, A NY BANKING CORP.
Effective date: 19880329
Owner name: GAYLORD CONTAINER CORPORATION, A CORP. OF DE
Jul 21, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: BANKERS TRUST COMPANY, A NY BANKING CORP.
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:GAYLORD CONTAINER CORPORATION, A CORP. OF DE;REEL/FRAME:004922/0959
Effective date: 19880329
Sep 24, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: GAYLORD CONTAINER LIMITED, ONE BUSH STREET, SAN FR
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST. SUBJECT TO CONDITIONS RECITED;ASSIGNOR:CROWN ZELLERBACH CORPORATION, A CORP OF NV.;REEL/FRAME:004610/0457
Effective date: 19860429