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Publication numberUS3519214 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 7, 1970
Filing dateNov 25, 1968
Priority dateNov 25, 1968
Publication numberUS 3519214 A, US 3519214A, US-A-3519214, US3519214 A, US3519214A
InventorsLester E Hawkins, Alexander Konrad
Original AssigneeAlexander Konrad, Gloria R Hawkins, Lester E Hawkins, Lucille L Konrad
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for rolling fabric bandages
US 3519214 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 7, 1970 KONRAD ETAL APPARATUS FOR ROLLING FABRIC BANDAGES 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. 25, 1968 July 7, 1970 A. KONRAD ET AL APPARATUS FOR ROLLING FABRIC BANDAGHS 2 Sheets-Sheet L3 Filed Nov. 25, 1968 INVENTORS. we/A/s', KOA/EAD United States Patent 3,519,214 APPARATUS FOR ROLLING FABRIC BANDAGES Alexander Konrad, Parma Heights, and Lester E.

Hawkins, Cleveland, Ohio, assignors of twenty-five percent each to Lucille L. Konrad, Parma Heights,

and Gloria R. Hawkins, Cleveland, Ohio Filed Nov. 25, 1968, Ser. No. 778,569 Int. Cl. B65h 17/14 US. Cl. 242-67.1 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A machine for converting a flat length of fabric material into a roll of said material and including a base, a pair of vertically spaced and juxtaposed continuous belts supported on said base and adapted to receive the lead ng end of said fabric material therebetween, roll starting means on said base, means pivotally connecting one end of one of said belts to permit pivotal movement of the other end of said one belt relative to the other of said belts, and means driving said belts in contra directions and at differing speeds relative to one another.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to machines designed to roll flat strips of fabric material and, more specifically, the present invention pertains to a machine for rolling a fiat strip of material to form what is now commonly known as an ACE bandage.

An ACE bandage in its basic form is generally sold over the counter in drugstores, department stores, sporting goods stores, and through other retail outlets and is generally supplied to the purchaser in its rolled configuration. Such bandages are manufactured of a fibrous material which is relatively flexible, and, to some extent, is resilient. Such bandages are generally used to wrap injured limbs of patients and are, conventionally, about four inches wide and from four to ten feet long.

Prior to this invention, Ace and other related types of bandages have been hand rolled. Such work is tedious and suffers other drawbacks such as, for example, the lack of uniformity in the length of one belt with respect to the lengths of other belts since in manually winding the fabric bandage strip the bandage roller rolls the bandages with more or less tension on the bandage as the diameter of the rolled bandage increases. Of course, such strips of fabric bandage could be precut into predetermined lengths to preclude any lack of uniformity in the length of the bandage, but such precut lengths, especially if the same approached a length of ten feet, are difficult to handle and therefore increases the costs of production.

It is, therefore, one of the primary objects of this invention to provide a mechanically operated machine for rolling an Ace type bandage to any given diameter and of any predetermined length.

It is another object of this invention to provide a machine for rolling bandages of the Ace type expeditiously and with but the minimum expenditure of time by an attendant.

This invention contemplates, as a still further object thereof, the provision of a bandage rolling machine which is non-complex in construction and assembly, inexpensive to manufacture and maintain, and which is rugged and durable in use.

Other and further objects and advantages of the instant invention will become more manifest from a consideration of the following specification when read in the light of the annexed drawings.

In the drawings:

"Ice

FIG. 1 is a top plan view of a bandage rolling machine constructed in accordance with this invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the machine shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a schematic view illustrating the start of the rolling operation and illustrating in successive steps the increasing diameter of the bandage roll as the same approaches the discharge end of the device or machine;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary detail side elevational view, partly in cross-section, FIG. 4 being taken substantially on the vertical plane of line 44 of FIG. 1, looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 5 is a partial medial transverse cross-sectional view, FIG. 5 being taken substantially on the vertical plane of line 55 of FIG. 4, looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary perspective view, partly in cross-section, and illustrating the components of the machine at the pivotal end thereof; and

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the stop or abutment means utilized in limiting the pivotal movement of the upper belt towards its associated lower belt.

Referring now more specifically to the drawings, reference numeral 10 designates, in general, a bandage rolling device or machine constructed in accordance with the teachings of this invention. As is illustrated in the several figures of the drawings, the machine 10 includes an elongated substantially rectangular channel-shaped base member 12 having a centrally located substantially rectangular web 14 from the longitudinally extending marginal edges of which depend the lateral flanges 16, 18.

Fixedly secured by conventional means (not shown) on one end of the web 14 (at the left-hand side of the machine as viewed in FIGS. 1 and 2) is a conventional electrically energizable motor 20 connected to a suitable source of electrical power through the cable 22. The drive shaft (not shown) of the motor is operatively connected with the input side of a conventional speed reducer unit 24 having an output shaft 26 on which is mounted a driving pulley 28, and the latter includes a pair of pulley wheels 30, 32 of different diameters to provide a change of driving speeds.

Spaced inwardly from the speed reducer 24 is a pair of substantially upright rectangular standards 34, 36, the standards 34, 36 having their respective lower ends fixedly connected by conventional fastening means 38 to the opposed sidewalls 16, 18, respectively. A second pair of standards 40, 42 is provided, the last named standards being secured by conventional fastening means 44 on those ends of the sidewalls 16, 18 remotely disposed from the fastening means 38. As is clearly seen In FIGS. 2 and 4, the fastening means 44 are received in normally horizontally elongated slots 46 and comprise in cooperation therewith conventional belt tightening or take-up means.

The standards 34, 36 adjacent their upper ends, are provided with coaxially aligned journals 48, 48, respectively, and each of the journals 48, 48 rotatably receives therein bushings 50, 50, the latter being fixedly connected on a shaft 52 having an enlarged head 54 at one of its ends which normally bears against an end of the adjacent journal 48. Mounted on the shaft 52 is an enlarged cylindrical roller (see FIG. 5), and the roller 56 is connected on the shaft 52 as by means of the axially extending spline 58. As is seen in FIG. 5, the roller 56 is disposed between the standards 34, 36, and the shaft 52 is of such length as to provide an extension 60 splined at 62. The extension 60 of the shaft 58 is spline connected to a compound or multiple speed pulley here generally designated by the reference numeral 64 (see FIGS. 1 and 3).

The standards 34, 36 also receive and support for rotation a second shaft thereon, the shaft and bearing means being identical to those described above and carrying prime marks for the purpose of differentiation. The shaft 52, it should be noted, extends parallel to the shaft 52 in vertically spaced relationship relative thereto, and the shaft 52' supports the cylindrical roller 56' for rotation therewith, the two rollers 56, 56' being substantially of the same diameter.

An endless belt 66 is trained around the pulley Wheels 30 and 66 of the compound pulleys 28, 64, respectively, to establish a driving relationship therebetween. An endless belt 68 connects the compound pulley 64' in driving relationship with the compound pulley 64.

A substantially U-shaped elongated channel member 70 has integrally formed depending legs 72 at the opposed sides thereof, the legs '72 being fixedly connected by conventional fastening means 74 to the standards 34, 36. The channel member 70 is also provided with integrally formed downwardly depending lips 78 at each side thereof, the lips being fixedly connected by conventional fastening means 80 to the adjacent one of the standards 40, 42. The channel-shaped member 70 also includes a pair of longitudinally extending sidewalls 82, 84 disposed in parallel relationship relative to one another. The channel-shaped member 70 also includes a bight portion 86 to which further reference Will be made below.

The standards 40, 42 support therebetween an elongated shaft 88 journalled for rotation thereon by the same means described above in connection with the support of the shafts 52, 52'. The shaft 88 carries a roller 90 of somewhat smaller diameter than the roller 56', and trained around the rollers 56', 90 and over the bight portion 86 of the channel member 70, and between the sidewalls 82, 84 is an endless carrier belt 92.

The standards 34, 36 are each formed with slots 94, 96, respectively, (see FIGS. and 6), and secured to the remotely disposed sides of each of the standards 34, 36 are the arms 98, .100 of a substantially U-shaped kicker or bandage roll starting device 102. As is seen in FIGS. 5 and 6, the arms 98, 100 are secured to the standards 34, 36 by conventional fastening means 104, and the in ner ends thereof project across the slots 94, 96 and are integrally connected together by means of a bight member 108 on which is rigidly connected or integrally formed therewith a concave-convex element 110 with the concave side thereof facing downwardly. As is seen in the several figures of the drawings, the element 110 includes a leading edge 112 which is disposed in the path of travel of the belt 92, the direction of the travel of the belt 92 being indicated by the arrows shown in FIG. 4 of the drawings. As is seen in FIG. 4, the element 110 is disposed in close juxtaposition relative to the belt 92 and extends transversely thereof between the sidewalls 82, 84 of the channel member 70.

Also fixedly secured to the standards 34, 36 is abutment means 114, 116, respectively. Each of the abutment means 114, 116 is of identical construction and includes an L-shaped member having an elongated leg portion 118 fixedly secured to its respective associated standard 34, 36 by conventional fastening means 120, and an inwardly turned foot section 122 (see FIG. 4) which preferably receives a resilient liner 124 thereover formed of any suitable resilient material such as, for example, rubber. As is seen in the drawings, the foot sections 122 are disposed in spaced and confronting relationship relative to one another.

An elongated substantially open frame means here bears the general reference numeral 126. The frame means 126 includes a first substantially U-shaped bracket 128 having a bight 130 from the opposed ends of which laterally project the arms 132, 134, respectively, the arms 132, 134 being pivotally mounted for rotation about the journals 48. Connected to the bight portion 130, and projecting laterally away therefrom in a direction opposed to the direction of the extension of the arms 132, 134 is an elongated rod 136. The rod 136 has one of its ends fixedly connected by conventional means to a central portion of the bight 130, and the other end of the rod 136 is threaded as at 138.

A second bracket 410 includes a bight portion 142 which is centrally apertured as at 144 to receive the threaded end 1.38 of the rod 136 therethrough, the bight portion 142 being fixedly secured in an adjusted position by-means of clamp nuts 146, 148 threaded on the threaded end 138 and engaging the opposed sides of the bight portion 142 therebetween. Integral with the remotely disposed ends of the bight portion 142 are arms 150, 152 which carry journals 154, .156.

Reference numeral 158 denotes an elongated shaft having bushings 160, 162 at the opposed ends thereof and journalled for rotation in the journals 154, 156. Mounted on the shaft 158 between the arms 150, 152 is a cylindrical roller 164 of substantially the same diameter as the roller 90. Trained about the rollers 56, .164 is an endless belt 166.

As is seen 11 FIG. 4 of the drawings, the roller 164 is adapted to move from its full line position to its dotted line position, the pivotal movement being achieved by pivoting the frame about the axis of the shaft 52 in an upward direction. The frame 126 has its downward movement limited by the engagement of the bight portion 130 with the covered foot sections 122 of the L-shaped abutment means, 114, 116 which extend through the slot 94, 96.

Having described the component elements of this invention in detail, the operation thereof is set forth below.

Assuming that the motor 20 has been energized, the output shaft of the speed reducer 24 will rotate causing the driving pulley 28 to turn. Rotation of the driving pulley 28 causes the compound pulley 64' to rotate in the same direction by virtue of the driving connection therebetween achieved by the endless belt 66. This, in turn, causes the roller 56' to rotate in the direction of the arrow as shown in FIG. 4, and this, in turn, causes the belt 92 to move in the direction of the arrows (see FIG. 4) with the consequent rotation of the roller in the direction of its arrow as shown in FIG. 4.

The endless belt 68 connects the compound pulley wheel 64' in driving relationship with the compound pulley 64, but through its connection with the compound pulley 64 the turning of the latter is at a greater speed than the rotation of the compound pulley 64 whereby the cylindrical roller 56 travels at a greater rate of speed than the cylindrical roller 56. This causes the belt 166 to travel at a greater rate of speed than the belt 92, and with the underside of the belt 166 traveling in a direction contra to the direction of travel of the adjacent upper side of the belt 92. The roller 164 also turns in the same direction as the roller 64. The adjustment of the nuts 146, 148 provides for belt take-up or tensioning as the case may be.

With the motor energized and the belts traveling in their respective indicated positions in FIGS. 2 and 4, the user need but place the leading end of a strip of fabric 200 (see FIG. 3) on the traveling belt 96 adjacent the roller 90. As the leading end 200 of the fabric strip is carried in the direction of the roller 56', the same engages the leading edge 112 of the element and as the same moves upwardly thereover, the leading edge 200 engages the underside of the belt 166 and is rolled over as is shown, schematically, in FIG. 3, to start the rolling of the bandage here indicated by reference numeral 202.

As the rolling continues, the outside diameter of the rolled portion thereof gradually increases in outside diameter, and the rolled portion of the bandage 202 gradually shifts in its position relative to the bight 86 and forces the frame 126 to pivot upwardly as the rolled bandage 202 moves to the right or the discharge end of the apparatus as viewed in FIG. 3. If the bandage 202 is formed of a strip of fabric of predetermined length, the completed bandage is actually discharged from the apparatus at the completion of the rolling operation. On the other hand, if the bandage is formed from a continuous strip of fabric material, then as the rolled bandage 202 arrives at the discharge end of the apparatus, the fabric strip may be severed.

Having described and illustrated one embodiment of this invention in detail, the inventive concept is herein defined by the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1, Apparatus for rolling a strip of flexible fabric material into a rolled bandage and comprising:

an elongated normally horizontal base;

an elongated first endless belt having a pair of opposed ends;

means supporting said first endless belt on said base for movement relative thereto;

an elongated second endless belt having a pair of opposed ends;

means pivotally connecting one end of said second endless belt on said base with the other end thereof free to pivot towards and away from said first endless belt and to position portions of said belts in vertically spaced confronting position relative to one another to receive and roll said strip therebetween to form said rolled bandage; and

means connected in driving relationship with said one end of said second endless belt and the adjacent one end of said first endless belt.

2. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein:

said confronting portions of said endless belts travel in contra-directions and at differing speeds.

3. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein:

said second endless belt is positioned over said first endless belt;

said driving means driving said confronting portions of said endless belts in contra-directions; and

said driving means driving said second endless belt at a higher speed than said first endless belt.

4: Apparatus as defined in claim 3 wherein the leading edge of said strip of fabric material is imposed on the other end of said first endless belt for movement towards the first end thereof; and

means supported on said base and disposed in the path of travel of said strip adjacent said one ends of said endless belts to raise said leading end of said strip upwardly from said first endless belt into engagement said second endless belt to revert the leading edge upon itself and to initiate the rolling of said bandage.

5. Apparatus as defined in claim 4 wherein:

said supporting means for said first endless belt includes standards on each end of said base and rotatably supporting said first roller means thereon;

said first endless belt being trained around said first roller means;

an elongated frame having a pair of opposed ends;

said pivotally connecting means for said second endless belt including means for pivotally connecting one end of said frame on said standards adjacent said one of said base; and

roller means at each end of said frame around which said second endless belt is trained.

6. Apparatus as defined in claim 5 wherein:

said roller means each includes a shaft supported on the adjacent ones of said standards; and

said driving means is mounted on said base and is connected in its said driving relationship with said shafts adjacent said one ends of said endless belts.

7. Apparatus as defined in claim 6 and an elongated U-shaped channel member mounted on said standards receiving and supporting said confronting portion of said first endless belt thereon.

8. Apparatus as defined in claim 7 wherein:

said strip raising means includes a concave-convex element, and

means connecting said element from said standards adjacent said one ends of said endless belts and in the path of travel of said strip with said concave side of said element opening towards said first endless belt.

9. Apparatus as defined in claim 8 wherein:

said supported confronting portion of said first endless belt is slidably engaged with the bight portion of said U-shaped channel member.

10. Apparatus as defined in claim 9 and belt tightening means on said base and said frame.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 672,215 4/1901 Lewis 24255.1 1,490,544 4/1924 Stern 24255.1 X 2,939,645 6/1960 Rowl-ands et a1. 24256 3,315,908 4/1967 Wetzler 24267.1

GEORGE F. MAUTZ, Primary Examiner

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US672215 *Sep 25, 1895Apr 16, 1901Willard I LewisMachine for forming laps from sheets of cotton.
US1490544 *Feb 1, 1922Apr 15, 1924American Steel Wool Mfg CompanPreparation of steel wool
US2939645 *Apr 20, 1955Jun 7, 1960Molins Machine Co LtdWinding apparatus
US3315908 *May 3, 1965Apr 25, 1967Means & Co F WWinding apparatus
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US4573644 *Feb 27, 1985Mar 4, 1986Production Design Products, Inc.Carpet rolling machine
US4723724 *Apr 1, 1986Feb 9, 1988Paper Converting MachineWeb winding machine and method
US5803397 *Jan 23, 1997Sep 8, 1998Chang; Liang-MinWet tissue rolling-up device
US6729572 *Oct 31, 2001May 4, 2004Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Mandrelless center/surface rewinder and winder
US6866220 *Dec 21, 2001Mar 15, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Continuous motion coreless roll winder
US7909282Apr 30, 2007Mar 22, 2011Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Center/surface rewinder and winder
US8042761Oct 31, 2007Oct 25, 2011Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Center/surface rewinder and winder
US8210462Feb 28, 2002Jul 3, 2012Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Center/surface rewinder and winder
US8262011Oct 31, 2007Sep 11, 2012Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Center/surface rewinder and winder
US8364290Mar 30, 2010Jan 29, 2013Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Asynchronous control of machine motion
US8459587Mar 22, 2011Jun 11, 2013Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Center/surface rewinder and winder
US8535780Oct 6, 2009Sep 17, 2013Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Coreless tissue rolls and method of making the same
US8714472Mar 30, 2010May 6, 2014Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Winder registration and inspection system
US8757533Mar 30, 2010Jun 24, 2014Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Center/surface rewinder and winder
EP0198495A2 *Apr 16, 1986Oct 22, 1986Paper Converting Machine CompanyWeb winding machine and method
EP0199285A2 *Apr 16, 1986Oct 29, 1986Paper Converting Machine CompanyWeb winding machine and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/535.1, 242/541.3, 242/541.2, 242/535.4
International ClassificationB65H18/22
Cooperative ClassificationB65H2701/1846, B65H2701/174, B65H18/22
European ClassificationB65H18/22