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Publication numberUS3521311 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 21, 1970
Filing dateMar 1, 1968
Priority dateMar 1, 1968
Publication numberUS 3521311 A, US 3521311A, US-A-3521311, US3521311 A, US3521311A
InventorsPaul P Cohen
Original AssigneePaul P Cohen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mattress
US 3521311 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 21, 1970 P. P. CQHEN 3,521,311

MATTRESS Filed March 1, 1968 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. @404 R COHf/V July 21, 1970 P. P. COHEN 3,521,311

MATTRESS Filed March 1, 1968 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 W V E NTOR.

I BY 3 a 2 ,drroe/vfys P404 2 ("GA/67V ATTRESS M Paul P. Cohen, 1629 Rodeo Road, Arcadia, Calif. 91006 Filed Mar. 1, 1968, Ser. No. 709,641

Int. Cl. A47 US. Cl. -345 7 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Persons having spinal problems are particularly sensitive to the characteristics of the bed upon which they sleep. A static position of rest may result in undesired curvature of the spine, and hence create constant pressure on the spinal nerves with resultant discomfort and a tendency to maintain the person in a perpetual state of physical disability. The spinal curvature of the person resting in bed may occur in almost any direction, depending upon whether the bed is too hard or too soft, and the condition of rest which the person has assumed.

The static position of rest is only a part of the problem. The average person turns over from one side to the other about twenty or twenty-five times during a night of sleep. For the person with an injured or deteriorated spinal condition, the action of turning over creates torsional stresses which induce extremely severe discomfort and consequent lessening of the overall condition of health and physical ability. 'It will be noted that the act of turning over involves the dynamics of movement, and the action and reaction of dynamic forces, and is hence in the physical or mechanical sense a far more complicated phenomenon than that of a person simply lying in a static position. I

The present invention provides a mattress which is adapted to be supported on a hard, flat surface, such as a box that is used in lieu of the conventional bed springs. The mattress alone provides all of the cushioning and spring action that is needed. The materials and construction of the mattress are such that, in any static position of rest, a person resting upon the mattress is supported in a condition of comfort and without significant spinal curvature. Furthermore, the mattress of the present invention has a unique ability to respond to the turning action of a user, in a manner which completely avoids the customary torsional stresses. The user, after rolling over, is again completely comfortable in the new position.

DRAWING SUMMARY FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a bed incorporating the mattress of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an exploded perspective view of the mattress;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view taken on the line 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view taken on the line 4-4 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a corner detail of the mattress;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view taken on the line '66 of FIG. 5;

United States Patent 0.

Patented July 21, 1970 ice FIG. 7 is an elevational view of a person lying on one side on a conventional type of soft mattress;

FIG. 8 is an elevational view of a person lying on one side on a conventional type of a hard mattress; and

FIG. 9 is an elevational view of a person lying on one side on the mattress of the present invention.

PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The bed 10 includes a frame or carriage 11 on one end of which a headboard 12 rises vertically upward in the conventional manner. A box 15 rests upon the frame 11, and although the box 15 gives the appearance of being a conventional type of bed springs, it is not a spring but is in fact a rigid box having a hard flat upper surface upon which the matttress 20' is supported. Mattress 20 includes a generally rectangular member 25 having uniform thickness of at least several inches and formed of resilient open-celled synthetic elastomeric material. The member 25 consists of an upper layer 27 and an underneath layer '26, lWhlCh are in fact separate members, since they are not physically attached together. The underneath layer 26 is preferably of three inch thickness and the upper layer 27 is also preferably of three inch thickness. The underneath layer 26 is of integral construction and uniform characteristics throughout. The upper layer 27, however, consists of several separate parts designated as 27a, 27b, 27c, and 27d, respectively.

The complete mattress 20 also includes a ticking bag 30, of generally rectangular configuration, and which in the assembled condition of the mattress fully encloses the member 25 in a snug-fitting, slightly compressed, relationship. The ticking bag includes a bottom cover member 31, end walls 32, and side walls 33, which together form an open container as best seen in FIG. 2. The ticking bag also includes a separate top cover member 34 iwhich, during the manufacturing process, is attached to the lower portion of the ticking bag after the elastomeric member 25 has been inserted therein.

FIGS. 5 and 6 illustrate the manner in which the top cover member of the ticking bag is closed, and the ticking bag at the same time secured to the elastomeric member 25. Specifically, a tape 35 is utilized, which extends around the outer periphery of the top surface of the ticking bag. The tape 35 is sewed both to the top cover member 34 of the ticking bag, and to the side walls 33 and end walls 32. As shown in FIG. 6 a single set of stitches 36 are utilized, and this stitching extends in a slanted direction between the lateral edges of the tape 35 through the adjacent portions of the ticking bag, so as to secure the tape to the ticking bag and thereby complete the enclosed structure of the ticking bag. At the same time the stitching extends through the upper peripheral corners of the elastomeric member 25 so as to firmly secure the ticking bag to that member.

In the assembly process the elastomeric member 25 is selected to have a thickness in the vertical direction which is approximately equal to the interior opening of ticking bag 30. However, the width and length of the member 25 are selected to be somewhat greater than the corresponding dimensions of the ticking bag. For example, if the ticking bag has standard external dimensions of 54 inch width and 72 inch length, then the clastomeric member 25 is selected to have a 56 inch width and a 75 inch length. When the member 25 is inserted inside the ticking bag it is necessarily compressed to some extent, with the result that a snug-fitting relationship of the completed. assembly is assured.

The upper layer 27 of elastomeric member 25 is arranged as follows. The pan 27a occupies one side of the mattress, extending laterally from the longitudinal center of the mattress all the way to the left side (as seen in FIG.

2). Parts 2711, 27c, and 27d together make up the right hand side of the upper layer 27. Parts 27b is in the foot area of the bed; part 270 in the hip areas; and part 27d in the head area. As shown in FIGS. 3 and 4 the vertical joints at which the parts 27a, 27b, 27c, 27d a-but together are secured by adhesive 28. The adhesive extends throughout the portion of each joint that is adjacent the underlayer 26; however, the portion of the joint in contact with the ticking bag is not secured together. More specifically, the adhesive extends through a vertical distance Y which is approximately two inches, leaving an unsecured joint of about one inch vertical distance above the adhesive.

The advantage of making the elastomeric member 25 in several parts is that this construction facilitates different degrees of firmness in the mattress structure. The under layer 26 is preferably made of VERY FIRM material; the head part 27d of MEDIUM material; the foot part 27d of FIRM material; the hip part 270 of VERY FIRM material; and the part 27a of FIRM material. A person sleeping on the left side of the bed is supported by the part 27a having a FIRM characteristic, while a person sleeping on the right hand side is supported by a composite of MEDIUM, FIRM, and EXTRA FIRM. At the same time it is possible to turn the entire mattress upside down so that the under layer 26 (with its EXTRA FIRM material) becomes the upper layer. In this manner it is possible to select different physical characteristics of the particular surface portion of the mattress that each person is to use.

In constructing the mattress of the present invention it is preferred to utilize material having a density in the approximate range from two to four pounds per cubic feet, with a cell density in the approximate range of fifty to two hundred cells per lineal inch, and which is characterized by the ability to be compressed more than 75% for long periods of time without a thickness loss of more than 5%. Material of this type may perhaps be better described as reticulated than open-celled, and need not necessarily fall into any one of the accepted categories of polyurethane, polyester, or polystyrene material. For example, at present it is preferred to utilize the material manufactured by IStauffer Chemical Company and sold under the trademark EVERLON. This material, when prepared for the MEDIUM, FIRM, and EXTRA FIRM grades that are preferred in accordance with the present invention, has the characteristics shown by the following table:

TABLE 1. III. Extra Characteristic Medium II. Firm Firm Density, pounds per cubic foot 2. 25i0. 2. 505:0. 25 3. 2510. 25 Indent Load, 4 thick at 25% deflection 21-26 21-26 31-36 Indent Load Ratio (65/25) Minimum 2.0 2. 2 2.1 Tensile Strength, p.s.i., Minimum.. 12 7. 5 7. 5 Elongation, percent, Minimum"-.. 200 125 125 Tear Resistance, lb./i n., Minimum. 2.0 1.0 1.0 Compression Set, 22 hrs. at 158 F;

50% deflection, maximum percent 8. 0 10.0 80% deflection, maximum percen 10.0 90% deflection, maximum percen 15. 0 After humid aging 5 hrs. at 250 F. 00%, maximum Compression Load, Deflection Change: 25% deflection maximum after 5 hrs. at 250 F Resiliency, Ball, Rebound, Percent, Min 45. 0 Static Fatigue Test, 17 hrs. 75%

deflection:

25% indent loss, maximum 30. 0 25. 0 25. 0 Thickness loss, maximum 5.0 5.0 5.0

In accordance with the present invention the ticking material is preferably a type of material that is impervious to moisture, thereby keeping the interior of the mattress dry and clean.

According to the present invention elastomeric material is utilized which has a high rate of initial response to impact loading but a slow rate of return. When the person turns over, therefore, substantially no torsional stress is involved. But after the turning action is completed the elastomeric material slowly feeds itself back into a static supporting position Where the body of the person is supported at all points.

Referring to FIGS. 7 and 8, conventional mattresses as there illustrated have a poor distribution of static forces.

The spine S of the person P in FIG. 7 is curved because the mattress is too soft, and in FIG. 8 is curved in the opposite direction because the mattress is too hard. But with the present invention as shown in FIG. 9 (mattress parts 26, 27b, 27c, and 27d) a uniform force distribution is achieved. The spine S therefore lies perfectly straight.

The invention has been described in considerable detail in order to comply with the patent laws by providing a full public disclosure of at least one of its forms. However, such detailed description is not intended in any way to limit the broad features or principles of the invention, or the scope of patent monopoly to be granted.

Having described the invention, what is claimed as new in support of Letters Patent is:

1. A mattress comprising, in combination:

a pair of generally rectangular resilient, supple members formed of open-celled synthetic elastomeric material, each having a thickness of about three inches and being stacked together to provide a total thickness of about six inches;

and a generally rectangular ticking bag which fully encloses both of said members in a snug-fitting relationship;

said two elastomeric members having significantly different mechanical characteritsics whereby said mattress provides different supporting characteristics for a user depending upon which way it is turned;

one of said elastomeric members including at least two separate parts placed side by side, said separate parts having significantly different mechanical characteristics whereby on the corresponding side of said mattress the different surface portions thereof provide different supporting characteristics for a user.

2. A mattress as claimed in claim 1 wherein said two different parts have an abutting vertical joint, and are sccured together by adhesive throughout the portion of said joint that is adjacent the other one of said pair of elastomeric members, but are not secured together near the surfaces of said two parts which are in contact with said ticking bag.

3. A mattress comprising, in combination:

a pair of generally rectangular resilient, supple members formed of open-celled synthetic elastomeric material, each having a thickness of about three inches and being stacked together to provide a total thickness of about six inches;

and a generally rectangular ticking bag which fully encloses both of said members in a snug-fitting relationship;

one of said elastomeric members including at least two separate parts placed side by side, said separate parts having significantly different mechanical characteristics whereby on the corresponding sides of said mattress the different surface portions thereof provide different supporting characteristics for a user;

said two different parts having an abutting vertical joint, and being secured together by adhesive throughout the portion of said joint that is adjacent the other one of said pair of elastomeric members, but not being secured together near the surfaces of said two parts which are in contact with said ticking bag.

4. A mattress as claimed in claim 1 wherein said two elastomeric members have significantly different mechanical characteristics whereby said mattress provides different supporting characteristics for a user depending upon which way it is turned.

5. A mattress as claimed in claim 3 wherein said one elastomeric member includes one part extending laterally in one direction from the longitudinal center of the mattress, and at least two other parts each of which extends laterally from the longitudinal center of the mattress in the other direction, said last-named parts forming separate mattress portions for the head and toe areas whose mechanical supporting characteristics difier.

6. A mattress comprising, in combination:

a pair of generally rectangular resilient members formed of open-celled synthetic elastomeric material, each having a thickness of about three inches and being stacked together to provide a total thickness of about six inches;

and a generally rectangular ticking bag which fully encloses said members in a snug-fitting relationship;

said two elastomeric members having significantly different mechanical characteristics whereby said mattress provides dilferent supporting characteristics for a user depending upon which way it is turned;

said ticking being sewed to one of said members around the outer periphery of the top surface thereof;

one of said elastomeric members including at least two separate parts placed side by side, said separate parts having significantly different mechanical characteristics whereby on the corresponding side of said mattress the different surface portions thereof provide different supporting characteristics for a user.

7. The mattress claimed in claim 6 wherein stitching extends in a slanted direction from the lateral edges of said tape through the adjacent portions of said ticking bag, and also through the upper peripheral corners of said foam plastic members.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,051,601 8/1962 Schick 5-361 XR 2,859,455 11/1958 Koenigsberg 5345 3,419,920 1/1969 Maddux et a1 -c 5345 XR BOBBY R. GAY, Primary Examiner A. M. CALVERT, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

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Referenced by
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US3665530 *Jun 8, 1970May 30, 1972SealyMattress topper pad
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Classifications
U.S. Classification5/727, 5/740
International ClassificationA47C23/00, A47C27/15
Cooperative ClassificationA47C27/148, A47C27/144, A47C27/15
European ClassificationA47C27/15, A47C27/14E, A47C27/14C2