Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3521679 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 28, 1970
Filing dateApr 18, 1968
Priority dateApr 18, 1968
Also published asDE1918757A1, DE1918757B2, DE1918757C3
Publication numberUS 3521679 A, US 3521679A, US-A-3521679, US3521679 A, US3521679A
InventorsEdward L Copony
Original AssigneeDresser Ind
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dispensing nozzle
US 3521679 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 28, 1970 i E. L. COPONY DISPENSING NOZZLE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April 18, 1968 July 28, 1970 E. COPONY DISPENSING NOZZLE Filed April 18, 1968 2 Sheets-Sheet 2.

United- States Patent O 3,521,679 DISPENSING NOZZLE Edward L. Copony, Salisbury, Md., assignor to Dresser Industries, Inc., Dallas, Tex., a corporation of Delaware Filed Apr. 18, 1968, Ser. No. 722,309 Int. Cl. B67d 5/37 US. Cl. 141-208 9 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A dispensing nozzle comprising a valve, a pressure re sponsive mechanism arranged to prevent continued opening of the nozzle valve when the pressure in a chamber is below a predetermined level, and an air duct connected to the chamber having an open end next to the discharge end of the nozzle. A ferromagnetic member is mounted at the discharge end of the nozzle to block and unblock the air duct. A carrier slidably mounted at the discharge end of the nozzle moves between forward and rearward positions, and a magnet on the carrier positions the ferromagnetic member to block the air duct when the carrier is in its forward position'and unblock the air duct when the carrier is in its rearward position. Pressure in the chamber is maintained below the predetermined level when the air duct is blocked by the ferromagnetic member whereby continued opening of the nozzle valve is prevented.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a nozzle, and more particularly to a dispensing nozzle that prevents continued liquid flow except when the nozzle is inserted into the opening of a container.

Many dispensing nozzles used in gasoline service stations include automatic shut-off mechanisms that terminate gasoline flow when the open end of an air duct at the discharge end of the nozzle is blocked by the rising gasoline level in the tank being filled. Blocking the air duct creates an increased vacuum inside a chamber which causes a flexible pressure responsive diaphragm to trip the nozzle valve whereby fluid flow through the nozzle is terminated.

Recently, structure has been developed that prevents inadvertant liquid flow through dispensing nozzles by purposely blocking the air duct at all positions of the nozzle except the position it assumes during the dispensing operation. For example, Ehlers Pat. 3,323,560, granted June 6, 1967, discloses such a mechanism. In Ehlers, continued liquid flow through the nozzle is prevented at non-delivery positions but as long as the nozzle is positioned for delivery, liq-uid flow can occur. Thus, the nozzle can be operated to dispense liquid regardless of the presence of a liquid receiving receptacle. Romanowski Pat. 3,288,179, granted Nov. 29, 1966, also discloses a nozzle arrangement that prevents liquid flow except when the nozzle is positioned for delivery in a gasoline tank or similar container. A slidable sleeve is utilized to cover and uncover the open of an air duct at the discharge end of the nozzle. When the nozzle is inserted into a container, the sleeve moves away from the open end of the air duct thereby exposing it to atmospheric conditions. In Romanowski, the tolerance between the exterior of the nozzle spout and the interior of the slidable sleeve is extremely critical. Continual use of the nozzle causes the sleeve and/or spout to wear away thereby increasing the spacing between the spout and the sleeve. Thus, the blocking function of the sleeve is easily destroyed and air seeping into the spacing prevents the pressure in the vacuum chamber from falling 3,521,679 Patented July 28, 1970 "Ice below a predetermined level. Under these conditions, opening of the nozzle valve can occur regardless of the position of the sleeve. Scherer 3,259,154, granted July 5, 1966, describes a mechanism similar to that disclosed by Romanowski.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a liquid dispensing nozzle that operates in a highly efiicient manner to prevent continued liquid flow ex cept when the nozzle is positioned for delivery in the opening of a container.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with the present invention, a liquid dispensing nozzle is provided comprising a nozzle valve, a pressure responsive mechanism arranged to prevent continued opening of the valve when the pressure in a chamber is below a predetermined level, and an air duct connected to the chamber having an open end next to the discharge end of the nozzle. The improvement comprises a ferromagnetic member at the discharge end of the nozzle mounted to block and unblock the air duct. A carrier slidably mounted at the discharge end of the nozzle moves between forward and rearward positions, and a magnet secured to the carrier positions the ferromagnetic member to block the air duct when the carrier is in its forward position and unblock the air duct when the carrier is in its rearward position. The pressure in the chamber is maintained below the predetermined level when the air duct is blocked by the ferromagnetic member so that continued opening of the nozzle valve is prevented.

A biasing device connected between the carrier and the nozzle reacts in a direction that urges the carrier to its forward position. The carrier is arranged to engage the structure surrounding a container opening when the nozzle is inserted therein. The carrier then moves to its rearward position against the force of the biasing device 'which causes the ferromagnetic member to block the air duct.

The present invention also includes a vapor removal system including a conduit at the discharge end of the nozzle for removing vapors displaced during the dispensing operation. The vapors are drawn away from the discharge end of the nozzle for processing.

In one form of the invention the ferromagnetic member is a ball of restricted travel constructed to block the air duct when the carrier magnetic field is in the forward position. The ball travel is limited to evade the magnetic field of the carrier when the carrier is in the rear-ward position. Thus, the ball is free to drop by gravity to unblock the air duct when the nozzle is positioned for delivery. In another form of the present invention the ferromagnetic ball is always under the influence of the magnet as the carrier moves between its forward and rearward positions. In still another form of the invention the ferromagnetic member and the magnet on the carrier comprise a pair of parallel elongate magnets which operate contradirectionally.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING Novel features and advantages of the present invention in addition to those mentioned above will become apparent to one skilled in the art from a reading of the following detailed description in conjunction with the accompanying drawing wherein similar reference characters refer to similar parts and in which:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of a liquid dispensing nozzle according to the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view of the discharge end portion of the nozzle shown in FIG. 1 with the nozzle positioned away from a container;

FIG. 3 is a longitudinal sectional view of the discharge end portion of the nozzle shown in FIG. 1 with the nozzle positioned for delivery in the opening of a container;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken along line 4--4 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken along line S5 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 6 is a side elevational view of another liquid dispensing nozzle according to the present invention;

FIG. 7 is a front elevational view of the nozzle shown in FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a longitudinal sectional view similar to FIG. 2 of the nozzle shown in FIGS. '6 and 7;

FIG. 9 is a longitudinal sectional view similar to FIG. 3 of the nozzle shown in FIGS. 6 and 7;

FIG. 10 is a sectional view taken along line 1010 of FIG. 9;

FIG. 11 is a sectional view taken along line 1111 of FIG. 10;

FIG. 12 is a longitudinal sectional view similar to FIG. 2 of still another liquid dispensing nozzle according to the present invention; and

FIG. 13 is a longitudinal sectional view similar to FIG. 3 of the nozzle shown in FIG. 12.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Referring in more particularity to the drawing, FIG. 1 shows a liquid dispensing nozzle 10 comprising a flow directing casing 12 with a spout 14. The spout has a discharge end portion 16 from which liquid flows when the nozzle is activated for dispensing purposes. In this regard, a liquid line such as gasoline line 18 is connected to the casing 12 by a connector 20. Flow of the gasoline through the interior of the casing is controlled by a nozzle valve (not shown) connected for operation to a lever 22 pivotally connected to the casing.

The liquid dispensing nozzle 10 illustrated in FIG. 1 includes a vacuum chamber connected to the interior of the casing by a passageway. An air duct 24 is also connected to the vacuum chamber and the air duct has an open port 34 near the discharge end portion 16 of the nozzle. When gasoline flows through the interior of the casing a suction is developed which draws air through the air duct and the vacuum chamber. However, when the port end of the air duct is blocked by the rising level of gasoline in a tank, for example, the pressure in the vacuum chamber falls below a predetermined level. The reduced pressure in the chamber flexes a pressure responsive diaphragm connected to trip the nozzle valve. Automatic shut-off nozzles of this general type are explained in more detail in Boone Pat. 2,874,735, granted Feb. 24, 1959 and Krause Pat. 2,818,889, granted Jan. 7, 1958, for example.

The nozzle 10 of the present invention includes a ferromagnetic member 28 in the form of a steel ball mounted for movement to block an unblock the air duct 24. In this regard, a hollow fitting 30 at the discharge end portion 16 of the nozzle 10 has a passageway 32 that limits the movement of the ferromagnetic member 28 allowing the member to block and unblock the port end 34 of the air duct.

The nozzle 10 also includes a carrier 36 comprising a sleeve portion 38 and a conical portion 40 threadably connected to the sleeve at 42. The sleeve includes a first cylindrical segment 44 that slidably surrounds the spout 14 and a second cylindrical segment 46 eccentrical- 1y disposed relative to the spout, as shown in FIG. 4. The carrier is slidably mounted at the discharge end portion 16 of the nozzle for movement between a forward position, illustrated in FIG. 2, and a rearward position, illustrated in FIG. 3. In this regard, the sleeve portion 38 has a slot 48 within which a pin 50 fixed to the spout 14 fits to limit the forward and rearward motion and maintain alignment of the carrier. The carrier is biased to its forward position by a coil spring 52 that reacts between the carrier and a ring 54 secured to the nozzle spout 14.

A permanent magnet 56 is secured to the sleeve portion 38 between the segments 44, 46 for movement with the carrier 36 as it moves between its forward and rearward positions. The magnet 56 has a field strength sufficient to attract the ferromagnetic ball 28 when the carrier is in its forward position. Thus, when the carrier is positioned as shown in FIG. 2, the ferromagnetic ball 28 is attracted to the magnet and thereby positioned to block the air duct 24. With the air duct blocked by the ball continued actuation of the nozzle is prevented due to the suction developed in the vacuum chamber of the nozzle. Accordingly, when the carrier is located in its forward position on the spout 14 continued operation of the nozzle is prevented.

When one desires to dispense liquid into a container such as 58, the nozzle spout 14 is inserted into the container opening 60. As the spout is so inserted the conical portion 40 of the carrier 36 abuts the container at the opening 60, and continued movement of the spout into the opening causes the carrier to move to its rearward position against the force of the coil spring 52. As the carrier moves rearwardly relative to the discharge end portion 16 of the nozzle, the magnet 56 moves away from the ferromagnetic ball 28. The ball is prevented from moving in the direction of the magnet 'by the opening 26 of the air duct 24. Finally, the magnetic force acting to hold the ball over the opening 26 diminishes and the force of gravity causes the ball to move away from the open end of the air duct to the position illustrated in FIG. 3. Air is then drawn into the duct and the vacuum chamber as soon as flow starts after the lever 22 is operated to open the nozzle valve whereby the pressure in the chamber is maintained above the predetermined level. However, once the liquid in the container blocks the port 34 air cannot be drawn into the duct and the pressure in the vacuum chamber drops below the predetermined level. The nozzle valve is then automatically shifted to its off position.

Alternatively, if the nozzle is removed from the container opening 60 the coil spring 52 urges the carrier to its forward position on the spout 14. The force of the magnet 56 then attracts and positions the ferromagnetic ball 28 in covering relationship with the opening of the air duct. If the nozzle valve has not already been moved to its off position by releasing the lever 22 the suction developed in the vacuum chamber trips the nozzle valve to terminate liquid flow.

The nozzle 10 of the present invention also includes a vapor removal system 62 for removing vapors displaced during the dispensing operation. The system includes a conduit 64 having an open end portion 66 near the discharge end portion 16 of the nozzle. Suction applied to the conduit by an arrangement (not shown) functions to draw the vapors away from the area of the container during the dispensing operation. In this regard, the ring 54 on the spout 14 has a series of openings 68 and acts as a spacer between the spout and the conduit 64. Communication is provided between the conduit 64 and the container 60' via the openings 68 in the spacer ring and a pair of arcuate passageways 70 in the sleeve portion of the carrier 36 formed by the segments 44, 46 of the sleeve portion. Suction applied to the vapor removal system 62 withdraws vapors displaced during the dispensing operation into the conduit by communicating with conduit 72 via the route shown in FIG. 1 by the dashed arrows.

FIGS. 6-11 illustrate another liquid dispensing nozzle according to the present invention. The nozzle includes a ferromagnetic member 102 mounted at the discharge end portion 16 of the spout 14 by a hollow fitting 104 fixed inside the spout. The ferromagnetic member 102 comprises permanent elongate magnet 106 in a casing 108. The member is constructed and arranged for movement within a passageway 110 in the hollow fitting 104 to block and unblock the opening 26 of the air duct 24. A lateral opening 112 in the fitting communicates with the port 34 in the spout. Nozzle 100 also includes a carrier 114 having a cylindrical sleeve portion 116 and a conical portion 118 threadably connected to the sleeve at 120. As shown best in FIG. 7, the sleeve 116 loosely surrounds the spout 14 and includes an offset portion 122 having a longitudinal bore 124 that houses a permanent elongate magnet 126 with north and south pole ends.

The carrier 114 is constructed for movement between forward and rearward positions on the spout 14. In this regard, the cylindrical sleeve has a slot 128 and a pin 130 fixed to the spout is positioned in the slot to limit the forward and rearward motion and maintain alignment of the carrier. A coil spring 132 reacts between the carrier and a ring 134 fixed to the nozzle spout 14.

FIGS. and 11 illustrate the ferromagnetic member 102 in more detail. Basically, the magnet 106 has a north pole end and the portion of the casing 108 adjacent that end is arranged to cover the opening 26 of the air duct 24 when the carrier 114 is in its forward position on the spout 14. The casing of the ferromagnetic member 102 has four fiat sides 136 that provide longitudinally oriented spaces 138 between the member 102 and the passageway 110 in the hollow fitting 104. Moreover, the middle portion 139 of the casing 108 is recessed. Thus, when the ferromagnetic member 102 moves away from the open end of the duct 24 air can be drawn into the duct via the spaces 138, the recessed portion 139, the lateral opening 112, and the port 34.

The elongate permanent magnet 126 on the carrier 114 and the elongate permanent magnet 106 in the casing 108 are arranged with like poles closest to the discharge end of the nozzle spout 14. In FIGS. 8 and 9, the south poles of both of these magnets are closest to the discharge end of the nozzle for illustrative purposes. Accordingly, when the nozzle is in non-delivery position, the carrier 114 is urged to its forward position as shown in FIG. 8 whereby the repulsive magnetic forces of the like poles of both magnets has separated the two magnets wherein the south pole of magnet 106 in casing 108 is attracted to the north pole of magnet 126 in the carrier 114. Since magnet 106 in casing 108 is confined laterally in the passageway 110 in casing 108 and axially to a motion between the seated position blocking duct 24 and the other extreme of travel bottoming against the screw plug at the opposite end of the passageway 110' in fitting 104, there is no position within the described confines that the magnet 106 and casing 108 can assume other than that shown in FIG. 8 where the air duct 24 is blocked by the casing 108 housing magnet 106 when the carrier 114 is in its forward position thus preventing continued operation or flow through the nozzle.

In operation, when the nozzle 100 is inserted into the opening 60 of the container 58 the container structure surrounding the opening abuts the conical portion 118 of the carrier 114. Continued movement of the nozzle into the container opening then causes the carrier to move to its rearward position against the force of the coil spring 132. With the carrier positioned rearwardly on the nozzle spout 14 the magnet 126 secured to it is located as shown in FIG. 9. Rearward movement of the magnet 126 urges the ferromagnetic member 102 to move in the opposite direction and assume a position away from the opening of the air duct 24. The north pole end of the magnet 106 is then positioned opposite the south pole end of the magnet 126. Air is then drawn into the duct 24 after the lever 22 is actuated to open the nozzle and flow is started through the nozzle thus maintaining pressure in the vacuum chamber higher than the predetermined level.

The nozzle 100 also includes the vapor removal system 62. Ring 134 has a series of openings 140 and vapors displaced during the dispensing operation flow into the conduit 64 through a plurality of openings 142 in the carrier 114 and the openings in the ring when a suction is applied to the conduit. The vapors are drawn away from the nozzle for processing in the same manner as described above in conjunction with the embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 1-5.

FIGS. 12 and 13 illustrate still another nozzle 150 according to the present invention. The nozzle 150 is basically identical to the nozzle except for the ferromagnetic member 152 and the hollow fitting 154. Ferromagnetic member 152 comprises a ball 156 that moves within a passageway 158 in the hollow fitting. The fitting also includes L-sha'ped bore 160 connected at one end to the air duct 24 and at its other end to the passageway 158. The L-shaped bore 160 forms an extension of the air duct so that the duct opens at 162 into the passageway in the hollow fitting.

Operation of the nozzle is similar to the operation of nozzle 10 except that the ferromagnetic ball 156 is consistently under the influence of the magnet 126 as the carrier moves between its forward and rearward positions. Thus, when the carrier is positioned as illustrated in FIG. 12, the ferromagnetic ball covers the air duct opening 162 and prevents air from being drawn into the duct. Actuation of the nozzle is thereby prevented, as described above. However, when the nozzle is inserted into the opening 60 of the container 58, as illustrated in FIG. 13, the magnet 126 draws the ferromagnetic ball 156 away from the air duct opening 162. When the nozzle is activated air is drawn into the air duct via the extended portion 160, the passageway 158 and the port 34.

What is claimed is:

1. In a liquid dispensing nozzle having a valve, pressure responsive means arranged to prevent continued opening of the nozzle valve when the pressure in a chamber is below a predetermined level, and an air duct connected to the chamber having an open end next to the discharge end of the nozzle, the improvement comprising a ferromagnetic member mounted for movement to block and unblock the air duct, a carrier slidably mounted at the discharge end of the nozzle for movement between forward and rearward positions, and magnetic means secured to the carrier constructed and arranged to position the ferromagnetic member to block the air duct when the carrier is in its forward position and to unblock the air duct when the carrier is in its rearward position whereby the pressure in the chamber is maintained below the predetermined level and continued opening of the nozzle valve is prevented only when the carrier is in its forward position and the air duct is blocked by the ferromagnetic member.

2. The combination of claim 1 including biasing means reacting between the carrier and the nozzle in a direction that urges the carrier to its forward position.

3. The combination of claim 2 wherein the carrier includes abutment means constructed and arranged to engage the rim of a container opening when the nozzle is inserted therein whereby the carrier moves to its rearward position against the force of the biasing means and the ferromagnetic member moves to unblock the air duct.

4. The combination of claim 1 including a vapor removal system comprising a conduit network having an open end at the discharge end of the nozzle for removing vapors displaced during a dispensing operation.

5. The combination of claim 1 in which the ferromagnetic member is a ball.

6. The combination of claim 5 in which the air duct is constructed and arranged to limit the ferromagnetic ball from moving with the magnetic means when the carrier moves to its rearward position and thereby evade the magnetic field of the magnetic means whereby the ball is free to fall by gravity to unblock the air duct when the nozzle is positioned to deliver liquid into a container.

7. The combination of claim 5 in which the air duct is constructed and arranged to permit the ferromagnetic ball to move With the magnetic means as the carrier moves References Cited between its forward and rearward positions.

8. The combination of claim 1 in which the ferro- UNITED STATES PATENTS magnetic member and the magnetic means comprise 8. 3,323,560 6/1967 Ehl 141 .208 pair of parallel elongate permanent magnets. 5

9. The combination of claim 8 in which the ferro- HOUSTON S. BELL, JR., Primary Examiner magnetic member and the magnetic means operate contra-directionally.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3323560 *Mar 25, 1965Jun 6, 1967Ehlers KarlheinzLiquid-dispensing nozzle
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4031930 *Feb 9, 1976Jun 28, 1977Husky CorporationAutomatic shut-off nozzle with lockable vapor relief valve
US4060110 *Sep 30, 1976Nov 29, 1977Emco Wheaton Inc.Vapor recovery nozzle
US4195673 *Nov 20, 1978Apr 1, 1980General Motors CorporationFuel tank fill tube with a magnetically actuated valve
US4809753 *Jul 22, 1985Mar 7, 1989Husky CorporationAttitude control device for fuel dispensing nozzle
US5238034 *May 8, 1990Aug 24, 1993Sten CorfitsenApparatus for the automatic fuelling of automotive vehicle
US5645116 *Nov 6, 1995Jul 8, 1997Environmental Spout CompanyMethod and assembly for preventing dripping of a liquid dispensing nozzle
US8371271Oct 23, 2009Feb 12, 2013Federal-Mogul CorporationVapor vent control apparatus, system and outboard marine engine therewith
US8616252Nov 24, 2010Dec 31, 2013Opw Fueling Components Inc.Fuel dispensing nozzle with attitude sensing device
US20100102257 *Oct 23, 2009Apr 29, 2010Achor Kyle DVapor vent control apparatus, system and outboard marine engine therewith
US20140048173 *Jul 12, 2013Feb 20, 2014Elaflex Hiby Tanktechnik Gmbh & Co. KgFuel nozzle
USD772303 *Sep 25, 2015Nov 22, 2016Husky CorporationNozzle splash guard design
CN103573349A *Jul 19, 2013Feb 12, 2014伊拉弗莱克斯希比水箱技术有限责任公司装填喷嘴
CN103573349B *Jul 19, 2013Apr 19, 2017伊拉弗莱克斯希比水箱技术有限责任公司装填喷嘴
WO1990013512A1 *May 8, 1990Nov 15, 1990Sten CorfitsenApparatus for the automatic fuelling of automotive vehicles
Classifications
U.S. Classification141/208
International ClassificationF16K21/00, B67D7/44, B67D7/48, B67D7/42
Cooperative ClassificationB67D7/44, B67D7/48, F16K21/00
European ClassificationF16K21/00, B67D7/48, B67D7/44