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Publication numberUS3522801 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 4, 1970
Filing dateAug 6, 1968
Priority dateAug 6, 1968
Publication numberUS 3522801 A, US 3522801A, US-A-3522801, US3522801 A, US3522801A
InventorsRobinson Seymour
Original AssigneeHydrosonic Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ultrasonic dental hygiene device
US 3522801 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Liza- 4A United States Patent 3,522,801

[72] Inventor: Seymour Robinson [50] Field of Search l28/66; 24, Miami, Florida 631 [21] Application No; 750,634 221 Filed: Aug. 6, 1968 l [561 [451 Patented: Aug. 4, 1970 UNITED STATES PATENTS [73] Assignee: Hydrosonio Corp r n 3,401,690 9/1968 Martin l28/24UXR Miami, Florida Primary Exammer- L. W. Trapp a Corp of Florida Attorney- Lloyd J. Andres [54] ULTRASONIC Q T HYGENE DEVICE ABSTRACT: A hand operated device from which a jet of 6 Clalms, 6 Drawing Flgs.

water may be directed on the teeth and gums, which water 15 [52] US. Cl. 128/66, energized with ultrasonic energy from 3 transducer within the [28/24. 128/62: 32/50 device, which in turn is supplied by energy from an electronic [5 1] Int. Cl. t. A61]! 9/00 ultrasonic generator,

Patented Aug. 4, 1970 INVENTOR.

US. PATENT 3,522,801 ULTRASONIC DENTAL HYGIENE DEVICE This device relates in general to a portable dental device for removing plaque and calculus from the teeth and simultaneously stimulating the gums and more particularly to an electronic applicator which projects a stream of water energized with ultrasonic wave motion of predetermined frequency and intensity.

Prior to this invention, the teeth are usually cleaned by the use of a hand or power motivated brush and the use of a dentifrice which usually contains a mild abrasive. Since brushing alone does not prevent the ultimate formation of calculus. the periodic services of a dentist or a professional dental hygienist for sealing the formations from the teeth are normally required.

The present invention minimizes the above objections and disadvantages by the provision of an ultrasonic device in which a jet stream of water, energized by ultrasonic wave motion, is directed against teeth and will efficiently and quickly remove plaque and calculus from the teeth without damage thereto, the construction of which is a principal object of the invention.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a hand manipulated applicator which is supplied with a source of pressurized water through a flexible tube, which water is projected in the form of a jet stream from a nozzle on the forward end of the applicator and which may be directed against all sides of the teeth and through the interstices therebetween. The applicator includes an ultrasonic transducer therein connected by a flexible cord to a source of electric energy wherein the jet stream of water may be modulated with ultrasonic energy of predetermined frequency and intensity for cleaning the teeth and stimulating the gums.

A further object of the invention is the provision of an applicator for applying a jet stream of water from a nozzle upon all sides of the teeth, which nozzle is quick detachable for the substitution of different type nozzles for different predetermined uses.

These and other objects and advantages in one embodiment of the invention are described and shown in the following specification and drawing, in which:

FIGURE l shows a perspective view of the dental device connected to an illustration of an ultrasonic electronic generator.

FIGURE 2 is a cross sectional side view taken through section line 2-2, FIGURE 1, in reduced scale.

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged cross sectional end view taken through section line 3-3, FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged cross sectional end view taken through section line 4-4, FIGURE l.

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary enlarged cross sectional view illustrating the construction alternate to that shown in FIGURE 2.

FIGURE 6 illustrates the nozzle element shown in FIGURE l in partially removed position.

Referring to FIGURE 1, an elongated generally tubular body I, formed to be held by the hand, is preferably made of two halves of molded plastic material, secured together by adhesive or other means, and includes an elongated axial hollow ridge 2 for forming a water passage. A closure cap 3 is threaded in the rear end ofthe body I, shown in FIGURE 2.

The forward end of the body detachably retains a resilient nozzle 4 for projecting a stream of water excited at a selected predetermined ultrasonic frequency, to be hereinafter described.

A flexible tube 5 is connected to a source of pressurized water, regulated by well known valve means, not shown. An electric ultrasonic oscillator and amplifier means 6, preferably a solid state type, is provided with a power cord 7 for connection to a source of domestic A.C. electric power and has a knob 8 for frequency control, which frequency may be adjusted from 20,000 to 40,000 cycles per second but not necessarily limited thereto, and a knob 9 for power output control,

sometimes referred to as intensity, adjustablefor apower output of nozzle 4 less than one watt per cm. The output is conducted to the device by a pair of conductors in a flexible cord 10.

Referring to FIGURES 2 and 3, a tubular synthetic crystal transdgg er element 11, such as barium titanite, is slidably retained in a coaxial bore entering the rear of body I, as shown, and is retained therein by the cap 3 threaded into the end of the bore, which cap has a coaxial sleeve 12 positioned against the rear end of the transducer element.

The cord I0 enters a central hole in cap 3 and is retained therein by well known means. The conductors l3 and 14 in the cord are connected to the appropriate terminals, not shown, of the transducer element 11. The inner end of the transducer element terminates in a rigid metal cap 15 secured thereon, which cap has a coaxial metal cylindrical excitation or modulation rod 16 extending coaxially therefrom, which rod is loosely retained in a second coaxial bore in the forward portion of the body I and is hermetically and resilient sealed therein by a pair of resilient 0" rings 11;!1, The outer end 18 of rod 16 projects a pi'edeterriiined'distance from the front end of body I.

A channel or passage I9 in ridge 2 continues in body I and joins with a water metering bore 20 which terminates in an outlet 21 in the front end of the body 1.

The front end portion 22 of the body 1 has an outer converging conical shape witha coaxial circular recess 23 between the conical or bulbous front end portion of the body 1, better shown in FIGURE 6.

The nozzle 4, convergent from a base portion to a tip, is preferably made from an elastomer material, such as rubber or resilient plastic material and the end of the base portion has a modulation cavity adapted to be retained in sealed'relation on end portion 22 of body 1, as shown in FIGURE 2. The cavity in the nozzle also converges to an outlet orifice 24 in the tip end of the nozzle.

FIGURE 3 shows the water conducting tube 5 secured in the passage 19in ridge 2, preferably by adhesive means, which will conduct water at a predetermined volume and pressure through the metering bore 20 into the modulation cavity in nozzle 4 and around the end I8 of rod 16 and then from outlet orifice 24 in a concentrated smalljet stream.

FIGURE 5 shows a modification to the outlet end of the device by modifying the nozzle 4a to a lesser deflected angle. The outer end 18a of the rod 16 is also provided with an angular step 25, the action of which will be hereinafter described.

In operation and under the assumption that the device is connected to a source of regulated pressurized water of predetermined pressure and also connected to a source of ultrasonic energy of predetermined frequency and intensity, then the water will be carried by passage 19 in the body and flow through the metering bore 20 at approximate constant velocity and project as a jet stream from orifice 24 in the tip of the nozzle.

Further, under the assumption that the cord I0 is connected to the energized ultrasonic generator 6, then the transducer 11 will vibrate in a longitudinal direction at a frequency and intensity according to the adjustment of the knobs 8 and 9 of oscillator-amplifier 6.

It is now apparent that the end 18 of the modulation rod extending into the passageway in nozzle 4 will modulate the water flowing therethrough at the same frequency as the rod. Thus the device may be rotated in the mouth to clean all sides of the teeth and through the interstices therebetween, as well as stimulating the gums.

The alternate structure shown in FIGURE 5 illustrates a nozzle of alternate angle and an oblique step 25 in the end of the modulation rod I8a, which provides for greater modulation efficiency and therefor a greater output of ultrasonic energy in the jet stream from the orifice 24a.

It is apparent from FIGURE 6 that various different type nozzles may be quickly and conveniently interchanged.

It will also be apparent to those skilled in this art that other types of crystal transducer elements may be substituted for the crystal element above described and that a proper magnetostriction transducer may also be substituted with equivalent results.

lclaim:

1. An ultrasonic dental hygiene device comprising a means forming a hollow body shaped to be held in the hand,

said body having a water passage therethrough terminating at opposite ends in an inlet and an outlet.

a nozzle means convergent from a base portion to a tip portion with an open modulation cavity in the said base portion convergent to an outlet orifice in the end of said tip portion,

the base portion of said nozzle means secured on one end of said body with said cavity connecting said passage outlet,

a source of pressurized water,

a flexible tube connected to said passage inlet and said source of pressurized water to flow water through said passage and said modulation cavity and from said orifice in a substantially coherent stream,

an electric transducer means retained in said body and having a modulation member with the end portion thereof extending into said cavity to vibrate at a predetermined ultrasonic frequency when energized,

a source of electric ultrasonic energy,

flexible conductor means connecting said transducer means and said source of energy whereby the said water flowing through said cavity will be modulated at said frequency and energized by said end portion of said member to transfer a portion of said ultrasonic energy to said stream flowing from said nozzle.

2. The construction recited in Claim 1 including a resilient seal means positioned between said modulation member and said body for confining said water-to said cavity.

3. The construction recited in Claim 1 including said body having a circular groove around the end portion thereof which includes said water inlet and the said end portion of said modulation member,

said nozzle means made of an elastomer material and having an inward depending circular flange around said cavity in removable sealed engagement with said groove.

4. An ultrasonic device for cleaning the teeth comprising means forming an elongated hollow body shaped to be held in the hand,

said body having a water passage therethrough with a water inlet in the rear end portion thereof and a water metering outlet at the front end thereof,

a nozzle means convergent from a base portion to a tip portion with an open internal modulation cavity in the said base portion convergent to an outlet orifice in the end of said tip portion,

the base portion of said nozzle means secured on the said end of said body withsaid cavity joining said metering outlet,

a source of pressurized water,

a flexible tube connected to said'passage inlet and said source of pressurized water to flow water through said passage and said modulation cavity in a substantially coherent stream from said orifice,

an electric transducer means retained in said body and having a modulation member with the end portion thereof extending into said cavity to vibrate at a predetermined ultrasonic frequency when energized,

a source of electric ultrasonic energy,

flexible conductor means connecting said transducer means and said source of energy whereby the said water flowing through said cavity will be modulated and energized by said end portion of said member at said frequency. 5. The construction recited In Claim 4 in which sa|d transducer means includes a synthetic crystal type element to modulate and energize said coherent stream of water when energized by said ultrasonic energy.

6. The construction recited in Claim 4 wherein said nozzle means is shaped at a predetermined convergent angle with respect to said body to conveniently project said stream therefrom against and between the teeth.

Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification433/86, 601/2, 433/119
International ClassificationA61C17/20, A61C17/16
Cooperative ClassificationA61C17/20
European ClassificationA61C17/20