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Publication numberUS3523606 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 11, 1970
Filing dateDec 28, 1967
Priority dateDec 28, 1967
Publication numberUS 3523606 A, US 3523606A, US-A-3523606, US3523606 A, US3523606A
InventorsRobert F Oury
Original AssigneeHarsco Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus and method for diverting material from conveyors and the like
US 3523606 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. F. OURY 3,523,506 APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR DIVERTING MATERIAL I Aug. 11, 1970 FROM GONVEYORS AND THE LIKE 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Dec. 28, 1967 0 O O O O O O O /O O Q mm kn Imam vi mvw MS mac w \9 m Aug. 11, 1970 R. F. OURY 3,523,606 APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR DIVERTING MATERIAL FROM CONVEYORS AND THE LIKE Filed Dec. 28, 1967 3 SheetsSheet 2 58 M/l EA/TOR.

905mm oum Aug. 11, 1979 R. F. OURY 3,523,606

APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR DIVERTING MATERIAL FROM CONVEYORS AND THE LIKE Filed Dec. 28, 1967 Y 3 Sheets-$heet 3 Z 238 239 llVVENTOR.

ROBE/PT F OUR) United States Patent 3,523,606 APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR DIVERTING MATERIAL FROM CONVEYORS AND THE LIKE Robert F. Oury, Wayne, 11]., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Harsco Corporation, Wormleysburg, Pa., a corporation of Delaware Filed Dec. 28, 1967, Ser. No. 699,007 Int. Cl. B65g 39/07], 41/00, 47/76 U.S. Cl. 198-488 18 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Concrete mix can be effectively diverted from a conveyor belt without leaving residue or concrete mix on the surface of the belt by employing a series of staggered rollers adjacent and parallel to a diverting blade. The rollers are positioned so that a moving conveyor belt is urged into a configuration corresponding to the shape of the lower edge of the blade, whereby all points of contact between the belt and blade are maintained at equal pressure.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to conveyors and more particularly to a device for diverting concrete mix from a moving conveyor belt at various positions along the surface of the belt.

Apparatus of the same general class as the present invention (i.e., designed to divert concrete mix from a conveyor belt to a predetermined location) is commonly used to pour long strips of concrete such as lanes of a motor vehicle expressway. In most commercial apparatus of this type, a conveyor is used which employs a belt placed between two pulleys to form a closed loop long enough to straddle a lane of highway under construction. One of the pulleys (hereinafter called a receiving pulley) is placed at the end of the conveyor which receives materials to be transported (e.g., concrete mix), and the other pulley (hereinafter called a return pulley) is placed at the opposite end of the conveyor. In order to conveniently divert cement to a desired location, a carriage is mounted on the conveyor to enable movement thereof along substantially the entire length of the belt. A diverting blade is generally mounted within the carriage and disposed at an obtuse angle in relation to the direction of travel of the belt, whereby concrete mix carried on the moving belt will strike the blade and be diverted therefrom.

In order to ensure uniform distribution of concrete mix as the diverting blade progresses along the length of the conveyor belt, the belt speed should remain relatively constant. For example, when the conveyor is used in transporting and pouring wet concrete mix, if the speed is too high, the concrete mix has a tendency to splash and to be uncontrollable when discharged and diverted. In contrast, if the belt speed is too low, the pouring and diverting operation requires more time than is actually necessary and the concrete mix tends to separate into its component parts.

In order to keep the belt speed constant, the total load on the drive motor must remain constant. Of course, if an increased volume of material or a denser material is carried by the conveyor, the load on the motor will increase, and the belt speed will decrease. However, even if the material is held to a constant volume and density, progressive layers'of partially hardened concrete, which tend to accumulate on the belt due to inefficient scraping action between the diverting blade and belt surface, place an increasing strain on the motor, thereby reducing the speed of the belt and the carrying capacity of the conveyor.

From the above discussion, it should appear that a build up of foreign residue on the outside of the conveyor belt must be prevented. However, it is equally important to prevent foreign material from collecting on the inside of the belt (as may occur because of splashing, stray particle overflow, etc.). When a residue of material remains on the belt after passing beneath the diverting blade, the material is partially loosened and has a tendency to vibrate off the side of the belt. If foreign matter such as a rock or pieces of concrete mix fall from the top of the belt loop to the inside surface of the bottom portion of the loop, the material may become wedged between the belt and one of the pulleys, and may cause damage or rough operation. Thus, in addition to the considerations outlined above, proper scraping of the exterior of the belt during diversion of concrete mix is important in order to minimize the possibility of foreign materials becoming inadvertently located on the interior portion of the belt.

Thus, it can be seen that even a slight deposit of foreign material on the belt surface may have a cumulative effect which prevents removal and diversion of concrete mix during successive cycles of operation and eventually results in substantial deposits of concrete mix on the conveyor belt which prevent effective operation of the apparatus.

A build-up of foreign residue can be prevented to some extent by providing auxiliary scraping devices at various positions along the belt loop. However, commercially available scraping apparatus has not been entirely success ful in preventing residue and generally requires frequent adjustment in order to ensure effective operation. Moreover, auxiliary scrapers increase the initial cost of the conveyor and require periodic maintenance which invariably increases the over-all operating expense of a conveyor.

Accordingly, a primary object of the present invention is to provide a diverting arrangement which leaves no trace of foreign residue on a belt surface after the belt has come in contact with a diverting blade.

Another prior art method of reducing residue resulting from the diverting operation is to increase the pressure between the belt surface and diverting blade. While this method is at first effective to remove concrete residue from the belt surface, it results in rapid destruction of the diverting blade and increases the horsepower requirements of the motor used to move the belt. Continued operation of the diverting apparatus with a worn or grooved blade causes rapid deterioration of the belt surface and drastically reduces the life of the belt.

Accordingly, a related object of the present invention is to provide an effective diverting device which results in a minimum of pressure between a diverting blade and a belt surface.

In order to provide effective cleaning of the belt surface and at the same time reduce friction to a minimum, equal pressure must be provided at all points of contact between the belt surface and diverting blade. Unfortunately, the type of blade which has proven most effective for cleaning has not been readily adaptable to the equal application of pressure between the belt and blade. Effective diverting action is normally best achieved by using a thin, hard blade made from hardened steel or an equivalent material. Blades made from softer materials invariably leave a small residue on the surface of the belt, which, over a period of time, can accumulate and create deposits of concrete mix which hinder optimum performance. Moreover from considerations of cost and ease of manufacture and replacement, a straight steel blade is generally preferred over blades with curved surfaces. In spite of the foregoing advantages, if a straight blade is used in an ordinary conveyor, it is impossible to maintain equal pressure across the entire width of the conveyor belt since a loaded belt has a generally parabolic cross-sectional configuration due to the weight of the mixture being transported.

Moreover, even if a parabolic scraper blade which conforms to the shape of a loaded belt is provided, equal pressure cannot ordinarily be maintained across the entire width of the belt since the shape of the belt varies with the amount and texture of the concrete being transported, speed of operation, and the age of the belt.

Accordingly, another important object of the present invention is to provide improved conveyor diverting techniques which result in equal pressure at all points of contact between a diverting blade and conveyor belt, independent of load conditions and tension on the belt.

It is yet another object of the present invenion to provide an effective conveyor diverting device which can be used with a straight blade.

Yet another general object of the invention is to provide techniques which can be used to divert materials to either side of a conveyor belt.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In order to achieve the foregoing as well as other objects and advantages in accordance with the present in vention, a conveyor belt is urged into a configuration which conforms to the shape of a diverting blade surface and thus creates equal pressure at all points of contact as the belt passes beneath the blade. In order to urge the conveyor belt into the proper configuration, a serie of staggered rollers which are adjacent and parallel to a diverting blade are employed. The staggered rollers lift the belt into a configuration which conforms to the shape of the lower edge of the blade. When a straight blade is used, the rollers urge the belt into a fiat configuration just before it passes beneath the blade. As a result, the blade skims smoothly over the belt and removes residue to an extent unattained by prior art techniques. After the belt has passed beneath the blade, the surface returns to its normal parabolic configuration and passes around a return pulley in preparation for another operating cycle.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The above-mentioned objects, advantages, and features of the present invention will hereinafter appear, and, for purposes of illustration but not of limitation, an exemplary embodiment is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which like reference characters refer to like parts throughout and in which:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary, top plan view of a preferred form of a conveyor diverting apparatus designed in accordance with the requirements of the present invention and shown in association with a belt and conveyor unit;

FIG. 2 is a fragmetary front plan view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary, right side plan view of the scraper assembly shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged, fragmentary view of the roller assembly and diverting assembly made in accordance with the preferred embodiment of the invention and shown schematically in FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged, fragmentary view of the preferred form of the invention shown schematically in FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged, fragmentary, partially sectioned top plan view of the invention shown in FIG. 1; and

FIG. 7 is an enlarged, fragmentary, partially sectioned left side plan view of a portion of the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring to the drawings, a preferred embodiment of the invention would be used with a conveyor assembly 7, a support assembly 32, a plurality of wheel assemblies 56-58 and 59 (not shown), and a pulley drive system 80, and comprises: a traveling carriage 92; a diverting as- 4 sembly 136; an adjusting assembly 141; and a roller assembly 209.

As best seen in FIGS. 1, 2, and 3, conveyor assembly 7 comprises a front member 11, a rear member 13, and a cross member 15. Member 11 includes rail section 12, 12, and member 13 includes rail sections 14, 14, all of said rail sections extending lengthwise along the conveyor. At one end of the conveyor a drive pulley 17 is mounted on a shaft 21, and at the opposite end, a return pulley 19 is mounted on a shaft 23. Shaft 21 is mounted between member 11 and member 13 on bearings and 27 and, in a similar manner, shaft 23 is mounted between member 11 and member 13 on bearings 29 and 31.

A conveyor belt 20 is fitted around pulleys 17 and 19 to form a closed loop having a top portion T, a bottom portion B, a forward edge adjacent member 11, a rearward edge adjacent member 13, an outer surface 0, and an inner surface I.

A conventional V-roller assembly 24 is mounted near pulley 17 and comprises rollers 28 and 30, which are arranged in a V-shaped configuration. A center rod 27' is extended through the centers of rollers 28, and is attached to members 11 and 13 by brackets 28' and 30', respectively. Another V-roller assembly 26 is mounted between pulley 19 and carriage 92, and is constructed in the same manner as V-roller assembly 24. The V-shaped roller assemblies tend to urge the top loop of the conveyor belt into a generally parabolic trough-like configuration when the belt is loaded with material. The assemblies shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, of course, are not operative since the belt is displaced by the carriage. However, as the carriage is moved away from the location illustrated, the belt comes in contact with the assemblies and is urged into the described configuration. Those skilled in the art will recognize that other roller assemblies similar to assemblies 24 and 26 may be placed along the length of the conveyor at convenient intervals.

Support assembly 32 comprises support members 33, 35 which are slidably mounted inside cross members 34, 36 and are arranged perpendicular to members 11 and 13 in conveyor assembly 7. In order to brace members 11 and 13 at the end portion thereof, reinforcement members 37 and 41 are attached parallel to and beneath front member 11. In a similar manner, reinforcement members 39 and 43 are attached parallel to and beneath rear member 13. Members 37 and 39 are joined at opposite ends by a plate 38 and a bracket 44, respectively, and members 41, 43 are joined at opposite ends by a plate and a bracket 45, respectively.

The angular disposition of the wheel assemblies with respect to the conveyor is regulated by adjustable brackets 47, 48 which have a series of holes corresponding in size to holes in panels 50, 51. Brackets 47, 48 are rigidly attached to support members 33, 35, respectively, and are held in place by pins 53, 54, respectively, which pass through holes in both the brackets and panels. By revolving the support members to desired positions within their associated cross members and pinning the attached adjustable brackets in the appropriate holes, the wheel assemblies may be inclined at a variety of angles with respect to the conveyor assembly. When one end of the conveyor is at an elevation different from the opposite end, the angle of the wheel assemblies are ideally adjusted so that only vertical loads are applied to the wheels and the surface on which they are riding.

Wheel assemblies 57 and 58 are attached to adjustable arms and 61, respectively (FIG. 3), and wheel assemblies 56 and 59 are attached to adjustable arms 62 and 62'. (Arm 62, not shown in the drawings, is located opposite arm 62 in a position corresponding to the placement of arm 61.) Arms 60 and 61 are in turn attached at either end of a structural member 64 (FIG. 3). In a like manner, adjustable arms 62 (not shown) and 62 are attached at either end of a corresponding structural member 63 (not shown) and can be understood from the disclosure in FIG. 3. Structural members 63 and 64 are connected to support members 33 and 35 by pins 33a, 33b, and 35a, 35b, respectively (FIGS. 1 and 3). The pins may be removed to allow the wheel and support assemblies to rotate about the center pins 34' and 36 of cross members 34 and 36, respectively. Such a procedure allows the conveyor to be positioned at a skewed angle with respect to the center line of the work area by moving the wheel assemblies on opposite ends of the conveyor to opposite sides of the center line.

As best seen in the right hand portion of FIG. 3, arm 61 may be adjusted to the position shown in broken lines in order to lower the height of the conveyor in relation to the work area. The remaining adjustable arms 60, 62, and 62 may be adjusted in a similar manner which can be understood with reference to FIG. 3. The height of the conveyor may also be adjusted -by positioning the wheel assemblies on various pivot posts such as 70, 70, and 71, 71' which are positioned on adjustable arms 60 and 61, respectively (FIG. 3). In order to lower the height of the conveyor, wheel assembly 57 would be positioned on pivot post 70 as illustrated by the broken line representation in FIG. 3. Of course, in order to retain the conveyor in a horizontal plane, wheel assembly 58 would be reconnected to pivot post 71 and wheel assemblies 56 and 59 would be repositioned on corresponding pivot posts located on adjustable arms 62 and 62'. The proper positioning of wheel assemblies 56, 58 and 59 will be obvious to those skilled in conveyor arts from the disclosure shown in FIG. 3 regarding Wheel assembly 57.

Each of the wheel assemblies is constructed in a similar manner and, accordingly, a detailed description of assembly 56 will be sufficient for a understanding of the other assemblies. (Assembly 59, located opposite assembly 56, is not shown in the drawings.)

As best seen in FIG. 2, wheel assembly 56 comprises a bracket 65 which is connected to arm 62 by a flange 67 and a pivot post 68, and is further connected to a shaft 72 of a wheel 73. A motor 74 is securely mounted to bracket 65 and is connected to wheel 73 through a gear box 75, a motor pulley 76, a belt 77, and a wheel pulley 78.

Wheel assemblies 57 and 59 are constructed in the same manner as wheel assembly 56, except that motors and associated pulleys and belts are not supplied therewith. Wheel assembly 58 (FIG. 3) includes elements identical to those described in connection with wheel assembly 56 and can be understood from the description thereof.

As best seen in FIGS. 1 and 2, pulley drive system 80 comprises a pulley motor 81, a gear box 83, a pulley 84, and a chain 85 which passes along the inside of member 11. The chain is connected between pulley 84 and a pulley 86 which is mounted on a shaft 87. Chain 85 passes over sprockets (not shown) connected with the drive and return pulleys 17, 19. When motor 81 is in operation, it drives chain 85 and hence drive pulley 17 and return pulley 19, as well as belt 20, at a predetermined speed.

As best seen in FIGS. 1, 2, 3, and 6, traveling carriage 92 comprises a frame 93 including top members 94-97; front side members 99 101, 103, and 104; rear side members 105, 107, 108, and 109; and bottom members 111 and '113 connected between wheels 115, 119, and 117, 121, respectively. (Wheel 117, connected opposite wheel 115, is not shown in the drawings.) As best seen in FIGS. 2 and 3, wheels 115, 117, 119, and 121 are mounted on the rails extending from the top and bottom edges of members 11 and 13. Also attached to traveling carriage 92 is shroud 122 which controls the discharge of material from the conveyor.

A guide panel 132 (FIG. 6) is attached to frame member 101 and is used to help direct materials into shroud 122. A similar guide panel 134 is connected to frame member 107, and is used to direct materials to the rear 6 side of the belt loop when shroud 122 is attached to frame members 107 and 108.

It should be noted that conveyor assembly 7, support assembly 32, and pulley drive system as well as the foregoing elements of traveling carriage 92 are made from well known components. Accordingly, other parts and combinations of parts known to those skilled in the conveyor arts may be substituted without detracting from the features of the present invention.

Traveling carriage 92 also includes an idler 125 connected to frame 93 by brackets 127 and 129, and an idler 131 connected to frame 93 by brackets 133 and 135 for purposes that will hereinafter appear. A pair of forward vertical guide rollers 123 and 123' are connected to brackets 127, 129, respectively, and a corresponding pair of rear vertical guide rollers 124, 124' are connected to side members 109, 103, respectively. The guide rollers are used to center belt 20 as it passes through carriage 92.

The diverting assembly 136 is located within carriage frame 93 and, as best seen in FIG. 5, comprises a blade 137 rigidly attached to a bar 138. The blade is preferably made from a hardened steel, or the equivalent, and has a straight, smooth lower edge 137 which mates with the outer surface 0 of the conveyor belt on the top side T of the belt loop. Bar 138 is welded to the lower edge of a rolled, curved plow 140 which diverts material into shroud 122 when the conveyor is in operation.

Adjusting assembly 141 has elements attached to the traveling carriage frame and the diverting assembly and is used to adjust the diverting assembly in various comating positions with belt 20. The elements attached to the carriage frame include forward anchoring assemblies 142, 144 and rear anchoring assemblies 143, 145.

As best seen in FIGS. 5 and 6, anchoring assembly 144 comprises a horizontal rod 149 which is welded at one end to a panel 153 which is in turn securely anchored to carriage frame member 105. Forward anchoring assembly 142 is the mirror image of assembly 144, and the construction details thereof may be easily understood by reference to the foregoing description of assembly 144.

As best seen in FIGS. 5 and 6, anchoring assembly comprises panels 155, 156 which are joined in juxtaposition and rigidly attached to frame member 104. Assembly 145 also includes a horizontal rod 159 which is welded at one end to panel 156. Rear anchoring assembly 143 is the mirror image of assembly 145, and may be understood with reference to the foregoing description thereof.

As best seen in FIG. 6, diverting assembly 136 is attached to anchoring assemblies 144 and 145. When anchored in the position shown, the diverting assembly moves materials toward the front side of the belt loop (i.e., toward shroud 122). As will be described in more detail later herein, diverting assembly 136 may also be connected to anchoring assemblies 142, 143 in order to move materials toward the rear side of the belt loop (i.e., toward frame member 108).

The adjusting assembly also comprises positioning assembly which includes a support 177 comprising a horizontal panel 178 and a vertical panel 179, both welded adjacent the top portion of plow 140 and extending across the entire width thereof. Handles 176, 176' are connected to panel 178 and provide a means for manually controlling the positioning assembly during the adjustment process. Connected to panel 179 adjacent the forward edge of the diverting assembly (i.e., the edge of the assembly adjacent idler 125) is an angle bracket 180. As best seen in FIGS. 5 and 6, angle bracket 180 comprises a vertical member 181 rigidly attached to panel 179, and a horizontal member 182. A U-shaped orifice is cut from horizontal member 182 in order to accommodate a portion of a turnbuckle '191. U-shaped bracket 183 comprises a member 187 (FIG. 6) which is rigidly attached to panel 179 and a similar member 7 185 which is connected to member 187 at one end thereof. As best seen in FIG. 5, turnbuckle 191 comprises an eyelet 193 which is attached to the lower end of a threaded bolt 195. The threaded bolt is received by a collar 197 which is attached to angle bracket 180 by a head member 199.

The elements of the positioning assembly connected to the diverting assembly at the rear edge thereof (i.e., the edge adjacent idler 131), include angle bracket 201, U- shaped bracket 203, and turnbuckle 205 which are identical to brackets 180, 183 and previously described turnbuckle 191.

As best seen in FIGS. and 6, panels 153 and 156 are received by U-shaped brackets 183 and 203, respectively. Moreover, rods 149 and 159 are held in position by turnbuckles 191, 205 and pins 206, 207, which prevent the turnbuckles from sliding off their respective rods. As will be described in more detail later, the elements of the adjusting assembly are used to adjust the pressure between the diverting blade and conveyor belt and to locate the diverting assembly in either of two alternative operating positions.

As best seen in FIGS. 4-7, roller assembly 209 comprises a support bar 211 which has a forward end adjacent idler 125 and a rear end adjacent idler 131. The forward end of bar 211 terminates in a cylindrical collar 213 which is preferably welded to the bar. The collar is positioned around a vertical pivot post 215 (FIGS. 5 and 6) which is rigidly attached to member 105 of the carriage frame. A corresponding pivot post 217 is connected to frame member 99 and is used for positioning collar 213 when the diverting and roller assemblies are placed in their alternate operating position.

The rear end of bar 211 terminates in a rod 219 which is concentric with the center line of the bar. The free end of rod 219 is received by a corresponding hole in positioning member 221 which is rigidly attached to the carriage frame. A corresponding positioning member 222 is located opposite member 221 and is used to secure rod 219 when the roller assembly is used in its alternate operating position.

Roller assembly 209 also comprises rollers 223-230 which are connected to support bar 211 by arms 232-239, respectively. Although eight rollers are illustrated in the preferred embodiment herein, it should be understood that the optimum number of rollers may vary depending on the width of the conveyor belt and the nature of load to be transported. In the described embodiment, the

staggered rollers are placed approximately three inches r in front of the diverting blade 137. That is, the rollers are placed approximately three inches from blade 137 in a direction extending toward the drive pulley 17. However, the precise placement of the rollers may vary slightly depending on the size of the rollers utilized and the dimensions of the conveyor belt. As best seen in FIGS. 4 and 7, the rollers ride on the inside surface I of belt 20 and urge the belt into a configuration which conforms to the shape of the lower edge 137 of blade 137.

In the preferred embodiment, the center line of each of the arms makes an angle of about 55 with the center line of bar 211. However, those skilled in the art will recognize that a variety of other angles can be used to equal advantage depending on the angle at which the diverting assembly crosses the conveyor belt. Of course, the angle between each arm and the support bar should be such that the axis of each of the rollers is perpen dicular to the direction of travel of the conveyor belt.

As best seen by the cross-sectional views of the rollers shown in FIGS. 6 and 7, the rollers preferably comprise ball bearing units mounted on their respective arms. For example, in one embodiment, a series 63-2RS bearing manufactured by the S. K. F. Corporation was successfully used. However, those skilled in the art will realize that a variety of other rollers and bearings may be used to equal advantage.

As best seen in FIG. 6, material may be diverted toward the rear side of the conveyor (i.e., toward frame member 108) by connecting the diverting assembly between anchoring assemblies 142, 143, and by anchoring the roller assembly between pivot post 217 and positioning member 222. In order to disconnect the roller assembly from the position shown in FIG. 6, the rear edge of the conveyor belt is lifted and collar 213 is removed from pivot post 215 by grasping handles 176, 176. Then the entire roller assembly is disengaged from positioning member 221 and revolved in a counterclockwise direction (as seen in FIG. 6) until collar 219 is received within a hole in positioning member 222. Then the entire roller assembly is revolved around the longitudinal axis of support bar 211 through 180 of arc and collar 213 is lowered over pivot post 217.

Diverting assembly 136 is removed from the position shown in FIG. 6 by disconnecting turnbuckles 191, 205 and raising the assembly until brackets v183 and 203 (connected to the assembly) are raised above panels 153 and 156, respectively. Then the diverting assembly is revolved in a clockwise direction (as seen in FIG. 6) and the brackets 183, 203 are lowered over the panels in assemblies 142, 143 (corresponding to panels 153, 156). Turnbuckles 191 and 205 are then replaced on brackets 180, 201 and are placed around the rods located in assemblies 142, 143. Shroud 122 should, of course, be moved to the rear side of the belt loop and attached to frame members 107 and 108. Whenthe foregoing procedures have been completed, and the diverting assembly has been adjusted, material may be diverted toward the rear side of the conveyor belt.

The pressure adjustment of the diverting assembly will be described with reference to FIG. 5. In order to lower the forward portion of the blade (i.e., the portion adjacent idler and increase the pressure between the blade and the belt, head member v199 of turnbuckle 191 is turned in a clockwise direction (as seen in FIG. 6-). As collar 197 is turned, bolt 195 is drawn into the collar, and horizontal member 182 of angle bracket is drawn closer to rod 149. Since the angle bracket is rigidly attached to the diverting assembly and the rod is rigidly attached to the carriage frame, turning the head member in a clockwise direction will lower the diverting assembly and increase the pressure between the blade and the conveyor belt. In order to raise the diverting assembly, the head member is turned in a counterclockwise direction and bolt is gradually withdrawn from collar 197. This procedure raises the diverting assembly in relationship to rod 149 and dc creases the pressure between the blade and the conveyor belt.

In order to lower the rear portion of the diverting assembly (i.e., the portion adjacent idler 131), the head member of turnbuckle 205 is turned in a clockwise direction in order to draw the bolt into the collar thereof. In order to raise the rear edge of the diverting assembly, the converse procedure is carried out (i.e., the head member of turnbuckle 205 is turned in a counterclockwise direction).

In summary, the pressure between the blade and the conveyor belt may be increased by turning the head assemblies of the turnbuckles in a clockwise direction, and the pressure may be decreased by turning the head members in a counterclockwise direction (assuming the bolts have right-hand threads). The same procedure may be followed whether the diverting assembly is positioned as shown in FIG. 6, or in the alternate position described previously.

The invention is operated by placing the conveyor assembly over a work area by controlling the motors attached to wheel assemblies 5659. After the conveyor is in position, motor 81 is energized in order to drive pulleys 17 and 19 at a predetermined speed controlled by the operator. When pulleys 17 and 19 are revolved, a point on the top portion of the belt loop moves in a direction away from pulley 17, and material deposited adjacent pulley 17 is carried on the top portion of the belt toward carriage 92. As material is deposited on the belt, the weight of the mixtures creates a depression at the midline of the belt and results in a concave crosssectional configuration. The material loaded on the belt eventually passes over idler 1125 which raises the belt surface substantially to the level of blade 137 and urges the belt into a more nearly fiat configuration. After the material passes over idler 125, the belt again resumes a somewhat concave cross-sectional configuration due to the weight of material in the center portion thereof.

As the material in the belt passes over roller assembly 209, however, the staggered rollers 223-230, which are arranged'parallel to the blade, successively remove the concave depression at the center of the belt and urge the belt into a completely flat configuration as it sweeps beneath blade 137. As a result, the belt momentarily assumes a configuration corresponding to the lower edge 137 of the blade, and material located on the 'belt is smoothly swept into shroud 122. Although flattening the belt creates an opportunitty for material to flow from the sides thereof, experience has shown that the normal operating speed of the belt is sufiicient to preclude spillage during the brief instant in which the staggered rollers lift a particular point on the belt.

Because of the equal pressure distribution at all points of contact between belt 20 and blade 137, no trace of material is left on the belt surface after it sweeps beneath the blade. As a result, there is no way in which minute deposits of material can remain on the belt and gradually accumulate into deposits of sufficient size to interrupt or impair eflicient operation of the conveyor.

After the belt has passed beneath blade 137, it passes over idler 131 which retains the belt at a level corresponding to the height of blade 137. Subsequently, the belt passes over pulley 19 and returns to pulley 17 on the bottom portion of the loop.

When sufficient material has been diverted from the belt surface at any one location, a new area may be serviced by merely rolling carriage 92 to a new location on the conveyor assembly. Since carriage 92 is suspended on conveyor members 11 and 13 by wheels 115, 117, 119, and 121, the unit may be easily rolled by manual operation. However, power driving means may be employed to move the carriage, as by operatively connecting the wheels thereof to electric motors which can be operated by remote control.

It should be understood that the embodiments described are merely exemplary of the preferred practices of the present invention and that various changes, modifications, and variations may be made in the arrangements, operations, and details of construction of the foregoing disclosure, without departing from the spirit and the scope of the present invention, as defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a conveyor system having a power driven belt with an outer surface and an inner surface arranged to form a closed loop between a first pulley and a second pulley, an improved mechanism for diverting material from the belt comprising, in combination:

carriage means movably mounted on the conveyor system for movement between the first and second pulleys;

blade means mounted on the carriage means at an angle to the direction of travel of the belt and having a lower edge positioned in contact with the outer surface of the belt on the top portion of the loop; and

roller means mounted on the carriage means and con- 10 tacting with the inner surface of the belt on the top portion of the loop adjacent the diverting means so as to urge the belt into a configuration corresponding to the shape of the lower edge of the blade means, the said roller means including a plurality of rollers mounted on the carriage in a staggered configuration, each of said rollers having a point in contact with the inner surface of the belt at the top side of the loop adjacent and parallel to the blade means,

whereby the material carried by the belt is diverted therefrom in a direction transverse to the direction of movement of the belt.

2. In a conveyor system having a power driven belt with an outer surface and an inner surface arranged to form a closed loop between a first pulley and a second pulley, an improved mechanism for diverting material from the belt comprising, in combination:

carriage means movably mounted on the conveyor system for movement between the first and second pulleys;

blade means mounted on the carriage means at an angle to the direction of travel of the belt and having a lower edge positioned in contact with the outer surface of the belt on the top portion of the loop; and

roller means mounted on the carriage means and contacting with the inner surface of the belt on the top portion of the loop adjacent the diverting means so as to urge the belt into a configuration corresponding to the shape of the lower edge of the belt means,

whereby the material carried by the belt is diverted therefrom in a direction transverse to the direction of movement of the belt, wherein the roller means comprise a plurality of rollers mounted on the carriage in a staggered configuration, each of said rollers having a point in contact with the inner surface of the belt at the top side of the loop adjacent the blade means,

wherein the lower edge of the blade means is flat; wherein the contact points of said roller means lie in a plane parallel to the lower edge of the blade means; and wherein the leading edge of each of the rollers is positioned substantially an equal distance in front of the blade means.

3. An improved mechanism, as claimed in claim 2, wherein the blade means comprises a straight steel blade.

4. An improved mechanism, as claimed in claim 1, and further comprising means for adjusting the pressure between the belt and the blade means.

5. An improved mechanism, as claimed in claim 4, wherein the adjusting means comprises:

supporting means attached to the carriage means and adapted to hold the roller means in a preselected position;

anchoring means connected to the carriage means and adapted to maintain the blade means in a preselected position; and

positioning means attached to the blade means for varying the relative positions of the blade means and the anchoring means.

6. An improved mechanism, as claimed in claim 5, wherein the supporting means and anchoring means are provided adjacent both the front and rear lateral edges of the belt loop, whereby the roller means and blade means may be removably positioned to divert material to a preselected side of the belt loop.

7. An improved mechanism, as claimed in claim 1, and further comprising idler means mounted on the carriage means and positioned in contact with the inner surface of the belt on the top portion of the loop, whereby the belt is raised to substantially the same height as the lower edge of the blade means.

8. An improved mechanism, as claimed in claim 1, and further comprising power means for moving the car- 1 l riage means along the conveyor system between the first and second pulleys.

9. In a conveyor system having a power driven belt with an outer surface and an inner surface arranged to form a closed loop and with a blade having a lower edge positioned in contact with the outer surface of the belt on the top portion of the loop at an angle to the direction of travel of the belt, the improvement comprising a plurality of rollers arranged in a staggered configuration, each of said rollers having a point in contact with the inner surface of the belt on the top portion of the loop adjacent the blade so as to urge the belt into a configuration corresponding to the shape of the lower edge of the blade, the leading edge of each of the rollers being positioned substantially an equal distance in front of the blade.

10. A device, as claimed in claim 9, wherein the lower edge of the blade is fiat and wherein the contact points of said rollers lie in a plane parallel to the lower edge of the blade.

11. A device, as claimed in claim 10, and further comprising idler means positioned in contact with the inner surface of the belt on the top portion of the loop, whereby the belt is raised to substantially the same level as the lower edge of the blade.

12. In a conveyor system having a power driven belt with an outer surface and an inner surface arranged to form a closed loop and with a blade having a lower edge positioned in contact with the outer surface of the belt on the top portion of the loop at an angle to the direction of travel of the belt, the improvement comprising the blade having a flat lower edge and roller means having points in contact with the inner surface of the belt on the top portion of the loop adjacent the blade so as to urge the belt into a configuration corresponding to the flat lower edge of the blade, the said roller means comprising:

a support bar arranged generally parallel to the lower edge of the blade;

a plurality of arms attached to the support bar and having longitudinal axes generally perpendicular to the direction of travel of the belt; and

rotatable bearing means mounted on the arms and having axes of rotation perpendicular to the direction of travel of the belt,

whereby the said bearing means contact the belt and are rotatable therewith.

13. Apparatus for distributing concrete mix and the like comprising:

a power driven belt conveyor provided with a belt arranged to form a closed loop between a first pulley located at one end of the conveyor and a second pulley located at the other end thereof;

means for driving the pulleys so as to drive the belt at predetermined speeds;

carriage means movably mounted on the conveyor for movement between the first and second pulleys;

blade means mounted on the carriage means at an angle to the direction of travel of the belt; the bottom edge of the blade means being substantially fiat and being arranged to contact the outer surface of the belt; and

a plurality of rollers mounted on the carriage adjacent the point of contact between the blade means and the belt, each of the rollers having a point in con- 12 tact with the inner surface of the belt at the top side of the loop, the contact points of each roller lying in the same plane and each roller being staggered in location such that its leading edge is substantially an equal distance in front of the bottom edge of the blade means,

whereby the rollers urge the belt into a substantially flat configuration as it passes beneath the blade means.

14. Apparatus, as claimed in claim 13, and further comprising power means for moving the carriage on the conveyor between the driving pulley and the return pulley.

15. Apparatus, as claimed in claim 13, and further comprising means for adjusting the relative position of the blade means and the belt.

16. A method for diverting material from a belt conveyor having a diverting blade disposed at an angle to the direction of travel of the belt, with the lower edge of the blade being in contact with the belt, comprising the steps of:

causing the material to be placed on the belt;

moving the belt so that the material on the belt is carried toward the blade;

urging the belt into a configuration corresponding to the shape of the lower edge of the blade just prior to passing the belt beneath the blade by passing the belt over a plurality of rollers positioned in a staggered configuration, each of said rollers having a point in contact with the inner surface of the belt adjacent the blade; and

passing the belt beneath the blade while the belt is in said configuration;

whereby the material is diverted from the belt in a direction substantially transverse to the direction of movement of the belt.

17. A method, as claimed in claim 16, and further comprising the step of lifting the belt substantially to the height of the lower edge of the blade prior to the steps of urging the belt into a configuration which conforms to the shape of the lower edge of the blade.

18. A method, as claimed in claim 16, and further comprising the step of maintaining the belt at the same height as the lower edge of the blade after the step of passing the belt beneath the blade.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 11/1937 Lundbye "198-188 9/1951 Laprise 198-488 FOREIGN PATENTS 484,324 10/1929 Germany.

OTHER REFERENCES EVON C. BLUNK, Primary Examiner R. S. GAITHER, Assistant Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R. l98233 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No, Dated August 11,

InventorGQ Robert F. Oury It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

SIGNED AND REALFD M mm mum. J eolnilaiom 01 Patent:

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2099071 *Sep 11, 1935Nov 16, 1937Foote Company IncDistributing means for concrete pavers
US2569011 *Dec 7, 1949Sep 25, 1951Adrien LapriseApparatus for unloading conveyer belts
DE484324C *Oct 14, 1929Miag MuehlenbauAbwurfvorrichtung fuer Foerderbaender
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4723647 *Apr 19, 1985Feb 9, 1988Starline Products, Inc.Belt conveyor and feeder
US6464426 *Sep 1, 2000Oct 15, 2002Pierre GirouardVehicle dispensing system
DE2710040A1 *Mar 8, 1977Sep 14, 1978Mayer Stahl Apparatebau KgUebergabe- und transportvorrichtung fuer gegenstaende
Classifications
U.S. Classification198/364, 198/637, 198/812, 198/497
International ClassificationB65G47/74, B65G47/76
Cooperative ClassificationB65G47/766
European ClassificationB65G47/76B