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Publication numberUS3523687 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 11, 1970
Filing dateMay 9, 1968
Priority dateMay 9, 1968
Publication numberUS 3523687 A, US 3523687A, US-A-3523687, US3523687 A, US3523687A
InventorsKurt H Petersen, George L Warner
Original AssigneeMinnesota Mining & Mfg
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Inverter for sheets and cards
US 3523687 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 11, 1970 PETER-SEN ET AL 3,523,687

INVERTER FOR SHEETS AND CARDS Filed May 9, 1968 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 7 2 F/ci.

L v 5/ ,42 M

. I O RNEXS' Aug. 11 1970 PETERSEN ET AL- 3,523,687

INVERTER FOR SHEETS AND CARDS Filed May 9, 1968 E 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 K RT/71 5 5955 04 6502651 flak/Y5? United States Patent 3,523,687 INVERTER FOR SHEETS AND CARDS Kurt H. Petersen, White Bear Township, Ramsey County, and George L. Warner, Roseville Village, Minn., assignors to Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company, St. Paul, Minn., a corporation of Delaware Filed May 9, 1968, Ser. No. 727,786 Int. Cl. B65h 29/20, 29/34 US. Cl. 271-71 12 Claims ABSTRACT on THE- DISCLOSURE This invention is directed to a device for inverting each of a series of sheets or cards so that their printed or treated surfaces will be in proper orientation with each other after they have been printed or processed by photocopiers, key punch systems, card sorters, printing presses, processing machinery etc. Inversion is carried out by moving the sheets or cards through a series of angular races by means of a drive roller. After entering the device through an input race, the sheet or card is moved into an intermediate race which disposes it in a first position at an angle with respect to its plane of entry. In ,this position the direction of movement is reversed and the sheet or card is moved into a delivery race oriented at an angle from the intermediate race sufficient to invert the sheet approximately 180 from its position on entry.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The purpose of this invention is to provide a device for inverting sheets of material after one or both surfaces of the sheet have been affixed with indicia, images, designs, chemical coatings etc. The device is especially adaptable for inverting sheets of paper or cards, after they have been processed by photocopiers, oflice duplicators, key punch equipment, printing presses and imprinters. Usually the papers or cards are printed or otherwise applied with a continuum of indicia so that indicia printed on the various pages is sequentially related. The pages of books, letters, oifice memoranda, multiple page reports, serial documents and other similar text materials are an example. After printing, a proper sequential orientation between all of the pages must be maintained so that indicia printed on each page is in proper relation with related indicia on the other pages for reading, collating, filing, storing, bind ing, etc.

In many photocopiers and printing devices the several pages of a printed sequence are delivered from the printer onto a stack with the first page of the sequence face down at the top of the stack or face up at the bottom of the stack. Consecutive sheets are stacked in the same inverse order below or above the first page. Manual inversion of the stack per se will not correct the inverse orientation. Each sheet in the stack must be individually inverted to attain proper consecutive orientation between the pages.

Some prior art devices have been devised to reverse the position of articles or items delivered from hoppers or similar supply sources. Some of these devices employ the concept of driving the individual article along an enclosed track looped or curved upon itself at an angle sufiicient to invert the position of the article after it has passed through the track. For example, see FIG. Ingenious Mechanisms for Designers and Inventors, vol. 3, p. 469. Other devices such as the conveyance means of Copping et al. US. 3,368,701 have employed a series of rollers to form a semi-circular path through which individual flat items are delivered and inverted for the purpose of placing each item into a viewing position.

Moving sheets or cards through a looped track or around a semi-circular path formed by rollers would not 3,523,687 Patented Aug. 11, 1970 ice result in a satisfactory device for inverting printed sheets produced by office photocopiers, duplicators, key punch devices or high-speed industrial printing presses. A looped track sufiicient to invert sheets in letter size or larger would occupy a considerable amount of space. Also the sheets would tend to jam in the track if delivered into the system at high speed. A series of rollers to define a semicircle would be too bulky and complicated for adoption as an inverter in conjunction with the operation of photocopiers, duplicators, key punch devices, etc.

The system to which this invention is directed is compact and eificient. It inverts sheets by moving them by means of a single rotating roller through a series of angularly interconnected guides, pathways or races outlined by bafiies or reticulated grids. In the description below the interconnected guideways or pathways to guide the sheets will generally be referred to as races or raceways.

Inversion is accomplished by first moving the sheets into a first or input raceway which may be directly connected to the photocopier or printer. The sheets are then driven into a second or intermediate raceway to orient them at an angle to their plane of entry into the system. Inversion is completed by reversing their direction of movement in the intermediate race and turning the sheets through a further angle as they pass into a third or delivery raceway or through the delivery raceway into a storage bin. The magnitude per se of each angle through which the sheets are turned is not critical, the only requirement being that after passing through the two angles the sheets have been overturned approximately from their plane of entry.

Inasmuch as complicated driving means are eliminated and the three raceways are compact in size and space, the device can easily be adapted for use in conjunction with oflice photocopiers, duplicators, collators, key punch equipment and small high speed printing presses. The same principle of inversion may be utilized in conjunction with larger industrial equipment to provide an inverter suitable for inverting sheets delivered from high speed printing presses, imprinting equipment or process machinery for applying various types of coatings to individual sheets.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Understanding of the invention will be facilitated by referring to the accompanying drawings in which like numerals refer to like parts in the several views and in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective views of an inverter suitable for use in conjunction with photocopiers and the like;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken along the lines and in the direction of the arrows 22 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a front elevational view of the inverter with the cover, housing, frame and raceways partially broken away to show the mounting of the drive roller and the means to rotate same; and

FIG. 4 is a schematic sectional view of a modification of the inverter shown in FIGS. 1-3.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION While the embodiment shown in the drawings and described below is adaptable primarily for use in conjunction with photocopy machines, it is to be understood that the principle of the invention may be utilized to invert printed and imprinted sheets, cards, etc., in conjunction with key punch system, ofiice duplicators, collators, printing presses or imprinting equipment of all kinds whenever the delivered sheets must be inverted to main tain a proper sequential orientation between consecutive pages. Also the device can be used in conjunction with processes for coating the surfaces of plates or sheets with a chemical layer such as photosensitive surfaces of lithographic plates.

Relative to photocopiers, many of these devices provide feeding equipment which automatically feeds sets of original copies from which duplications will be made in the copier. In utilizing the copier, the operator usually loads the originals in image or face down orientation. When photocopying a consecutive series, the first copy of the series is generally placed at the bottom of the stack and the last copy at the top. The last original copy will then be the first to be fed into the machine for exposure. If loaded in this manner the photocopies or images reproduced from the originals will be delivered from the copier in correct sequence; that is in a face up orientation with the last copy at the bottom of the stack and the first copy at the top. However, insofar as the original copies are concerned, each copy will be delivered image face down into the discharge bin with the last copy of the series delivered first. After all originals have been exposed they will be oriented face down in the bin with the first page or copy at the top of the stack. In order to attain readable orientation between the pages, each sheet in the stack must be individually inverted.

Conversely, when manually feeding original copies, the first page of a consecutive series is usually exposed first. Since the photocopies reproduced from the originals are generally delivered image side up, the first photocopy in the sequence will usually be oriented face up at the bottom of the stack below all consecutive pages or copies. Manual inversion of the stack per se after all photocopies have been made will not result in placing the sheets in proper sequential orientation. Each page must be individually inverted to place the sheets of the stack into a readable order.

Similar problems often occur in delivery from other types of printing presses and imprinting equipment. The problem is particularly burdensome when it is desired to deliver sheets directly from the printer into a collator. To attain proper sequential orientation between pages it is necessary to invert each individual sheet after delivery from the printer.

The embodiment of the invention shown in FIGS. 1-3 of the drawings may be placed directly within the delivery system of a photocopier. Attachment between the delivery tray or bin and the delivery system of the copier is preferred. The copiers delivery system usually comprises a web, belt or series of rollers over which either the originals or photocopies are moved for delivery from the copier.

The illustrated embodiment comprises a housing of metal, plastic, or other suitable material generally designated by the numeral in FIGS. 1-3. The housing forms an enclosure by means of bottom panel 11, side panels 12 and 13, rear panel 14 and a partial front panel 15. Side panels 12 and 13 may have depending hooks 16 to secure the inverter within the delivery pathway of the photocopier. A frame 17 is designed to fit substantially coextensively inside housing 10 and suitably secured to front panel and in spaced relation to side panels 12 and 13.

Frame 17 supports a series of bafiles which form the three races or raceways for guiding the sheets through inversion. As seen in FIGS. 2 and 3 the bafiles are supported on frame 17 by means of right angled support members 18-21 formed integral with the frame and right angled members 2223 formed integral with the lower baffle and secured directly to the frame. The bafiles may be secured to the support members and frame by any suitable means although bolts are preferred so that the device can be easily disassembled. Frame 17 also supports a drive roller for moving the printed sheets through the races and the means for rotating the roller.

A cover 24 is suitably secured over housing 10 and has an elongated open-ended duct to assist in guiding the printed sheets as they are driven into and out of one of the races which is enclosed in the duct.

The bafiles which comprises a series of angulated plates form the three interconnected races or raceways. As seen in FIGS. 1 and 2 a first or input raceway 26 is formed by an upper input baffle 27 secured to right angled supports 19 and 21 and a spaced lower input bafile 28. Baffle 28- is secured to frame 17 by right angled members 22 and 23'. Raceway 26 formed by bafiles 27 and 28 is disposed adjacent the delivery web or rollers of the photocopier. The race extends through an input opening 29 which is formed by truncating the common juncture of frame 17 and cover 24. Individual sheets 30 comprising photocopies or originals are moved by the force of the delivery system of the copier over the surface of battle 28 with the image oriented face up in event the delivery system is ejecting photocopies or face down in the event originals are being ejected. In the event the delivery system of the photocopier or other device is inadequate to drive sheets 30 along the surface of bafile 28, an additional drive roller may be mounted on the baflle adjacent input opening 29 to insure adequate delivery into the inverter.

A second or intermediate raceway 31 to orient sheets 30 at an angle to their plane of entry is connected to raceway 26. Although the interniediate raceway is oriented substantially normal to the other two races in the device shown in FIGS. 1-3, normal orientation to the other races is not essential. It is sufficient if raceway 31 together with the third or delivery raceway are angularly oriented with respect to each other to form interconnected races to overturn or invert the sheets appoximately 180 as the sheets pass through the two races. It is preferred that the intermediate race be disposed at an angle of inclination with respect to the input race sufficient to keep the sheets from moving out of contact with the roller. After being driven completely into the intermediate race, the lagging or trailing end of each sheet must retain contact with the roller so that the sheet may be driven in an opposite direction of travel through the delivery race to complete inversion.

The intermediate raceway 31 comprises a pair of intermediate baffles 32 and 33. Bafiie 32 is an integral extension of the upper input bafiie 27 and is disposed at right angles to the latter by means of an angulated section 34 as best seen in FIGS. 2 and 3. Bafiles 32 and 33 are vertically disposed within cover 24 in parallel spaced relation to each other to provide a properly spaced raceway for guiding sheets 30. As seen in FIG. 2 the baffles are, disposed in biconvex relationship to properly orient the sheets 30 as they enter and leave raceway 31. The intermediate 'bafiles are encased within open ended duct 25 which acts as an additional guide to prevent sheets of varying lengths from curling or jamming over the top of the baffles.

A third or delivery raceway 35 may be joined to the intermediate race 31 at the proper angle to substantially complete inversion as the sheets enter the delivery race. Conversely inversion may be completed after entry into the delivery raceway by shaping it so that the sheets are turned through the second angle as they pass through the race after entry. In the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1-3 the delivery raceway 35 is oriented at a right angle from the intermediate race by curving the lower extension of baffle 33 substantially to form an upper delivery baffle member 36 integrally formed with bafile 33. Delivery baffle member 36 forms the upper guide for the delivery raceway 35 and is secured to frame 17 by bolting it to supports 18 and 20. Delivery raceway 35 extends to and terminates in a discharge opening 37 formed by recessing panel 14 along its juncture with cover 24. After inversion sheets 30 are ejected from the device through opening 37.

Individual sheets 30 are driven through the three raceways by a roller generally designated 38 and best seen in FIGS. 2 and 3. Roller 38 comprises a shaft 39 which is journaled for rotation to a pair of bearings 40 mounted on opposite sides of frame 17. The roller has a concentric layer 41 suitably secured to shaft 39 to provide a surface for frictional driving engagement with sheets 30. In the preferred embodiment, layer 41 consists of a compressible material such as polyurethane foam, a suitable vinyl or rubber material to provide both a driving surface and a surface that will compress or yield when the sheets are driven into and out of the intermediate race 31 which is disposed immediately above the roller. The layer 41 is corrugated to form an alternate series of ridges or lands 42 disposed adjacent grooves 43, the surface of the lands being used as the frictional driving surface of the roller. The roller 38 is disposed at the junc ture of the three raceways 26, 31 and 35. In this position it serves both as a driving and guiding structure.

In the embodiment shown in the drawings, the driving surface of lands 42 is in direct contact with the angulated section 34 of inverting baffie 32 and with the angular juncture of upper delivery bafile member 36 with bafie 33. The surface of the rollers will compress slightly on contact with the sheets to allow the sheets to pass between the roller and 'baffies. The baffles act as a backing to allow the driving surface of the lands to make firm contact with the sheets.

Direct contact between the roller surface and baffles 32 and 36 is not essential. If the roller surface comprises material having minimal wear resistance, the roller can be mounted so that the driving surface of the lands is spaced a minute distance from baffles 32 and 36 and still provide adequate driving means for moving the sheets through the inverter.

Roller 38 may be rotated by any appropriate means such as a power take off from the copier or other type of device with which the inverter is used. Rotation is in the direction of the arrow of FIG. 2 to drive the sheets into the intermediate raceway .31 from input raceway 26 and subsequently into and through delivery raceway 35.

A preferred embodiment is to provide a separate AC motor 44 with appropriate gearing. The motor, suitably connected to a power source is mounted on frame 17 within housing and disposed below roller 38 (as seen in FIGS. 2 and 3). Motor 44 is connected to a drive gear 45 which in turn rotates spur gear 46 integral with shaft 39.

The preferred rate of rotation in conjunction with inverting sheets from photocopiers has been found to be about 200 rpm. The rate of rotation will of course vary depending upon the characteristics of the sheets inverted, rate of delivery into the inverter, etc. The device will invert sheets delivered in rapid succession, the only limitation being that the leading edge of each sheet moved across input baffle 28 must be spaced from the trailing edge of the preceding sheet so that the leading edge of the trailing sheet is individually brought into contact with the roller.

As best seen in FIGS. 2 and 3 a series of serrations or fingers 47 extend from lower input bafile 28 and are partially convoluted around grooves 43 adjacent each land 42 of the roller. Fingers 47 and angulated section 34 form a restriction in the entrance to the intermediate raceway 31 so that the leading edge of the sheets will be correctly oriented and firmly contacted by the roller for entry. The fingers also form a guide to assist in the discharge of inverted sheets. As seen in FIGS. 2 and 3, fingers 47 disposed in grooves 43 are spaced below upper delivery bafiie member 36. Along with the surfaces of lands 42 of the roller, the fingers define the lower guide or bafile of the delivery raceway 35. Inverted sheets will be driven by the roller and guided by baffle member 36 and fingers 47 out the discharge opening 37 into a discharge bin 48 secured to panel 14 by hooks 49.

The bafiles are preferably smooth-surfaced and may be made from various materials such as plastic or metal. Sheet metal is preferable as the various angular configurafions can easily be obtained by stamping or bending the metal.

The device may be used to invert either the original copies used to make photocopies or the photocopies per se as they are delivered from the inverter. Inasmuch as the original copies are generally delivered from the photocopier in image face down orientation they will be delivered to the inverter in this position. Conversely, photocopies made from originals are usually delivered face up. They will therefore enter the inverter in image face up orientation. In either case image surface orientation will be reversed after the sheet has passed through the inverter and thus the inversion will correct improper orientation between pages of originals or photocopies sequentially delivered from the photocopier.

In operation sheets 30 will be individually delivered from the copier into input raceway 26 with the image facing up or down. The delivery system of the copier will move the sheets across the upper surface of lower input baffle 28 until the leading edge of the sheet contacts roller 38. Contact with the roller begins to orient the sheet to a position approximately at a right angle to its plane of entry by moving the leading edge through the restriction formed by roller 38 and fingers 47 with the angulated section 34. After passing through the restriction, the leading edge enters intermediate raceway 31 and contacts the inner surface of intermediate baffle 33. The concave contour of the inner surface of bafiie 33 tends to curve the sheet against the natural curl it would take after passing between the roller and the restriction so that the sheet will be properly oriented in a substantially vertical position in raceway 31. Continued rotation of the roller moves the entire sheet into raceway 31 so that sheet 30 is now completely disposed between intermediate baffies 32 and 33 at an angle substantially normal to its plane of entry into the device. Duct 25 assists the inverting baffles to orient the sheet.

As soon as the trailing edge of sheet 30 reaches a position immediately above roller 38 the continued rotation of the roller surface grips the edge and carries it in a substantially lateral direction into contact with the juncture of baffles 33 and 36. In this position the direction of sheet travel is immediately reversed by rotation of the roller. The lateral movement plus the reversed direction of travel tends to curl the sheet against the concaved inner surface of inverting. baffle 32 placing it in proper orientation for movement of the sheet out of the intermediate race. Roller contact with the trailing edge of the sheet (which now forms its leading edge) moves the sheets into the delivery raceway 35 where it is turned through the second angle necessary to attain inversion. In the described embodiment the sheets 30 are turned through the second angle as they are driven by the roller along the surface of the right angled juncture of upper delivery bafile 36 with bafile 33 into the delivery raceway 35. The sheet is now on a plane substantially at right angles to its position when in intermediate raceway 31 and has been inverted substantially from its position upon entry into the inverter. Thus if the image is delivered to the inverter in image up position it will be inverted to image down position and vice versa.

Delivery is accomplished by driving the sheets by means of the roller initially along the surface of upper delivery bafile member 36. The distal ends of fingers 47 assist in orienting each sheet as it passes through delivery raceway 35 and discharge opening 37 into bin 48. The fingers also assist in orienting sheets in the event the sheets fail to properly move around the right angled turn formed at the juncture of bafiles 33 and 36. If sheets 30 are composed of stiff material their edges may press into the compressible layer 41 until striking the fingers as the sheets are moved out of the intermediate raceway. The fingers will thus complete orientation by guiding the edge of the sheet into raceway 35.

In some situations it may be preferred to utilize an inverter modified somewhat from the device shown in FIGS. l3. This is particularly true if the inverter is to be used to invert large stock or sheets from printing presses or other processing devices. The modification may however be used for any of the applications discussed above and is particularly adaptable for inverting a large number of photocopies for delivery into collators.

The modified inverter as shown in FIG. 4 is similar in operation to the inverter in FIGS. 1-3 except that the three angulated raceways are outlined by a combination of baflie plates and reticulated grids, the latter formed by metal tubing or heavy wire. Further, the intermediate race may be oriented with respect to the input race either at an obtuse or right angle and the delivery raceway extends below the plane of the roller for discharging sheets. Inversion of the sheets a is completed by moving the sheets into substantially horizontal orientation as they pass over the curved end of the delivery raceway above discharge bin 48a. Also it is preferred to eliminate fingers 47.

The input raceway 26a comprises an upper reticulated grid 27a disposed in spaced relation above a lower plate or baffle 28a which is truncated adjacent roller 38a. Grid 27a is integrally joined at an obtuse angle adjacent the roller to one of the grids, 32a, forming the intermediate raceway 31a. The intermediate raceway is also formed by grid 33a spaced parallel from grid 32a a sufficient distance to outline the intermediate race. Grids 32a and 33a are reticulated and curved in the direction of the delivery end of the inverter. The curvature allows large sheets to curl along the natural curve they will take after being driven into the intermediate raceway 31a by roller 38a.

Grid 33a is integrally joined at a substantially right angle to an upper delivery grid member 36a. The delivery raceway 35a is formed by a plate or bafiie 47a, disposed in parallel spaced relation to a grid member 36a. One end of plate 47a is disposed adjacent roller 38a and the opposite end disposed over the discharge bin 48a. The end of the plate disposed over the discharge bin is curved to complete the inversion of the sheets and discharge them on a plane substantially parallel to the plane of the input raceway.

The grids forming the angled juncture of grid 27a with 32a and grid 33a with grid member 36a are disposed parallel with and in spaced relation to grooves 43a of the roller. In this position the tube or wire of the grid is disposed a minute distance within the groove 43a. As the sheets pass between the roller and grid the grid tends to press the sheet firmly against the driving surface of the lands of the roller disposed adjacent each groove 43a.

The modification of FIG. 4 may be mounted in a suitable housing or frame or attached directly to the printing press, collator or other printing device with which it is used. If necessary an input roller may be mounted along the input raceway 26a to insure adequate delivery of the sheets into the inverter.

In a slight modification of FIGS. 1-3, the angulated section 34 of bafile and the right angled juncture between intermediate bafllle 33 and upper delivery bafiie member 36 may have a series of embossed ribs formed on their surfaces forming the raceways. Similar to the tubes or grid of the above modification, the ribs extend parallel to the direction of sheet travel. The bafiies are positioned so that they are not in direct contact with roller 31 but in sufiiciently close spaced relation so that the embossed ribs extend a minute distance within grooves 43. Similar to the tubes or wires, the ribs serve to press the sheets into firm frictional engagement with the surfaces of lands 42.

In event the roller is rotated at high speeds or the angle of inclination of the intermediate race with respect to the horizontal plane of the input race is not sufficient to retain the trailing edge of the sheets in contact with the roller by gravity, the sheets may travel into the intermediate race to a position out of contact with the roller. In such event stops adjustable to the varying lengths of the sheets may be suitably secured along duct 25 or the raceway 31a to maintain the trailing edge of the sheets in driving contact with the roller.

What is claimed:

1. An inverter for inverting sheets delivered from a machine for afiixing material to at least one surface thereof, the inverter comprising in combination,

(a) a grooved roller for driving said sheets through said inverter;

(b) a first raceway for directing sheets delivered therein from said machine in a first direction toward and along a chordal plane of said roller for bringing the leading edge of said sheet into contact with said roller;

(c) a second raceway for receiving said sheets as they are driven past said roller in said first direction, the second raceway disposed at an angle with respect to said plane suflicient to retain said sheets therein with their trailing edge in contact with said roller; and

(d) a third raceway having an upper member disposed in spaced relation with the grooves of said roller for directing said sheets away from said roller in a direction opposite said first direction with the trailedge foremost through a pathway formed by said third raceway angularly oriented with respect to said second raceway to dispose sheets passing therethrough in a position inverted substantially from their position of delivery into said first raceway.

2. The inverter of claim 1 in which said first and second raceways comprise adjacent baffles in spaced apart relationship and said third raceway comprises an upper bafile member disposed in spaced relation from serrated fingers convoluted partially around the grooves of said roller for driving said sheets.

3. The inverter of claim 1 in which said second raceway comprises a pair of reticulated grids in curved parallel spaced relationship with each other.

4. The inverter of claim 1 in which the first and third raceways each comprise a plate and reticulated grids dispohsed in spaced apart parallel relationships with each ot er.

5. An inverter for inverting sheets from a first to second faced position as the sheets are delivered in sequence from a machine for afiixing images to the sheets, the inversion placing the pages of the sheets in serial relationship with each other, the device comprising (a) an input raceway forming a pathway to guide the sheets into the device in said first faced position as they are sequentially delivered from said machine;

(b) an intermediate raceway disposed substantially normal to said input raceway and having one end opening into and joining the input raceway to form a pathway for the transportation of sheets from the input to intermediate raceway;

(c) a delivery raceway having one end opening into and joining the intermediate raceway adjacent its juncture with the input raceway and disposed to form a pathway for guiding sheets moved therein from the intermediate raceway through a substantially right angle from their position in the intermediate raceway, the end opposite the juncture with the intermediate raceway terminating in a position to allow said sheets to be ejected from said inverting device;

(d) grooved roller means disposed adjacent the junctures of said raceways rotated for contacting the leading edge of said sheets and driving the sheets in a first direction from the sheets first faced position in the input raceway into the intermediate raceway to position the sheets substantially normal to their first faced position in the input raceway, the roller means upon continued rotation moving the trailing edge of said sheets when positioned in the intermediate raceway to a position adjacent the juncture of the intermediate and delivery raceway for entry into the delivery raceway and driving the sheets in a direction opposite said first direction through the substantially right angled pathway formed by the delivery raceway and out of the delivery raceway to orient said sheets into said second faced position inverted substantially 180 with respect to said first faced position; and

(e) bin means positioned adjacent the ejecting end of the delivery raceway to hold a plurality of sheets as they are ejected out of said delivery raceway in said second faced position and in the order of their delivery into the inverter.

6. The inverting device of claim in which the intermediate raceway comprises a pair of adjacent battles in biconvex spaced apart relationship.

7. The inverting device of claim 5 in which said raceways comprise a combination of reticulated grids and plates disposed in spaced apart relationship with each other, the reticulated grids at the junctures of said raceways disposed in spaced relationship to the grooves of said grooved roller.

8. The inverting device of claim 5 in which stop means to limit movement of said sheets are positioned in said intermediate raceway.

9. An inverting device for inverting printed sheets from a first to a second faced position after the sheets are sequentially delivered from a photocopy machine into the inverter, the inverter comprising:

(a) a housing with spaced openings on opposing sides defining an input opening for allowing the printed sheets to be delivered from the photocopier into the device and a delivery opening for allowing the printed sheets to be ejected out of the device;

(b) a cover over said housing, the upper portion of the cover elongated to define an open ended duct;

(0) a frame mounted substantially coextensive with the interior of said housing;

(d) angulated interconnected raceways mounted coextensively over the upper end of said frame, defining a horizontal delivery race substantially on the same in the housing to guide sheets delivered into the inverter by the photocopier in said first faced position, a horizontal delivery race substantially on the same plane as the input race adjacent the delivery opening of the housing and an intermediate race interconnected at right angles to the input and delivery race and extending into the open ended duct formed by said cover in a direction normal to the plane of the input and delivery races;

(e) a grooved rotating roller journaled to the frame and having a compressible driving surface, the roller disposed adjacent the interconnction of the intermediate race with the input and delivery races and rotated so that sheets delivered into the device by the photocopier in said first faced position along the input race will contact said roller and be driven through a first right angle from the sheets position in the input race into said intermediate race and open ended duct in a first direction and upon continued rotation of the roller be driven in a second direction through a second right angle from the sheets position in said inverting race and duct into said delivery race thereby inverting the sheet from its first faced position along the input race substantially 180 into said second faced position, said roller driving the sheets with sufiicient force to deliver them out of said raceway through the delivery opening of said housing;

(f) a bin secured to said housing to hold a plurality of sheets in stacked orientation as they are ejected from the device in said second faced position and in the sequence of delivery from the photocopier and (g) means mounted in the housing to drive said roller.

10. The angulated interconnected raceways of claim 9 wherein said raceways comprises a lower baffle extending from the input opening of said housing substantially coextensive over the upper end of said frame and housing, the baffle having a series of fingers partially convoluted about the grooves in said roller for guiding sheets driven into the compressible surface of said roller as they are moved into and out of said intermediate race; a pair of upper baflies disposed in spaced relation above the lower baffle, one of the upper baffies extending into said housing from the input opening, the other extending into said housing from the delivery opening to form respectively said input and delivery races with the lower bafile, each of the upper baffies having a substantially right angled section adjacent said grooved roller, the right angled sections extending from said roller in spaced apart relationship to form a pair of biconvex bafiies to define the intermediate race, the inner surfaces of the biconvex baflies forming concave surfaces adapted to orient the sheets for movement into and out of said intermediate race in said first and second directions.

11. The angulated interconected raceways of claim 10 in which the right angled sections of the upper baflles adjacent said roller are in contact with the surface of said roller.

12. The angulated interconnected raceways of claim 10 in which the right angled sections of the upper baffles adjacent said roller have a series of ribs extending from their surfaces and disposed in spaced relationship to the grooves of said roller.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 700,722 5/1902 Appel 271-63 X EDWARD A. SROKA, Primary Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R. 271

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,523,68Y Dated August 11, 1970 Inventor(s) KURT H. PETERSEN and GEORGE L WARNER It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Col 2, line 48: "views" should be --view-- Col 2, line 65: "system" should be --systems- Col. 7, line 54: "section 34 of baffle and" should be ---section 34 of baffle 32 and-- Col. 9, line 37, claim 9: "a horizontal delivery race substantially on the same" should be --a horizontal input race adjacent the input opening--.

SIGNED AND JR- m I. Wil a minnow-18.11 m 881 or w FORM P0405) HO'EQ) USCOMM-DC econ-Pee U 5 GOVERNNENY '"IN'ING OFFICE I," (J-Ji-3Jl

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3722995 *Apr 5, 1971Mar 27, 1973PhotophysicsData terminal system having improved means for producing and delivering flexible record sheets
US4161312 *Dec 7, 1977Jul 17, 1979U.S. Philips CorporationCard feeding mechanism
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Classifications
U.S. Classification271/186, 271/314
International ClassificationG06K13/04, G03G15/00, B65H15/00, G03B27/62
Cooperative ClassificationG03G15/6552, G06K13/04, B65H15/00, G03B27/625
European ClassificationG03G15/65L, B65H15/00, G03B27/62C4, G06K13/04