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Publication numberUS3524282 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 18, 1970
Filing dateOct 30, 1967
Priority dateOct 30, 1967
Publication numberUS 3524282 A, US 3524282A, US-A-3524282, US3524282 A, US3524282A
InventorsZygmunt J Czubachowski, Donald E Kraft, Wm Douglas Nobes
Original AssigneeCaldwell Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sash guiding and balancing apparatus for removable sashes
US 3524282 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 18, 1970 D. E. KRAFT ET AL 3,524,282

SASH GUIDING AND BALANCING APPARATUS FOR REMOVABLE SASHES Filed Oct. 30, 1967 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 DcmAL D E. KRAFT ZYMINT d, czue M. DQULAS Iva/3g;

Aug. 18, 1970 KRAFT ET AL 3,524,282

SASH GUIDING AND BALANCING APPARATUS FOR REMOVABLE SASHES Filed Oct. 30, 1967 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG] m 133 1 La 40 Damn.

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SASH GUIDING AND BALANCING APPARATUS FOR REMOVABLE SASHES Filed Oct. 50, 1967 S-Sheets-Sheet 3 FIG. 3 m. 4

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SASH GUIDING AND BALANCING APPARATUS FOR REMOVABLE SASHES Filed 001:. 30, 1967 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 FIG. 7

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United States Patent ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A window sash guideway resiliently urged toward the vertical edge of a slidable sash which releases the slidable sash when the sash is tilted inwardly, the guideway incorporating a self-locking sash balance, which automatically locks upon tilting the sash inwardly from said guideway.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the invention This invention relates to windows in which a vertically movable sash is removably held in guideways in which there is a sash balance disposed that locks automatically in the position it occupies when the sash is removed.

Description of the prior art Heretofore, removable sashes having balancing mechanisms have been removed by side pressure against a solid, spring loaded sash guide member with an accompanying pivoting motion of the sash. In other words, one of the sash guideways (which are usually aluminum or other metal) is mounted on springs so that a sideways pressure, wihch is brought to bear on the solid guide member and the sash, pushes against the solid sash guide member and the yielding springs, and permits disengagement of one side of the sash from the guide way on the other side. Such a mechanism is shown in the following representative references:

Starck, U.S. 2,307,647; Austin, U.S. 2,987,758; I. H. Mears, Jr., U.S. 2,722,723; Almendinger, U.S. 2,933,757; I. G. MacGregor, U.S. 3,116,520.

SUMMARY As contrasted with the prior art, described above, the present invention provides a sash guideway which cooperates with an automatically self-locking balancing mechanism, which permits a window sash to be tilted inwardly by simply pulling at the top of the sash, and automatically locking the balance mechanism including the sash carrier at the point at which it is located when the sash is tilted inwardly towards the operator. Hence, the present invention provides a removable take-out window with a selflocking sash carrier, which may be operated by simply pulling the top of the sash inwardly towards the operator, and does not require any additional operation such as pushing against a spring loaded guideway in order to release the window sash from the giudeway. The present invention also provides a weathertight seal which seals the room against drafts, and weather.

An object of the invention is to provide a safe window construction. Many fingers have been injured by falling window sashes. Friction sash guides without balancing springs are dangerous, for the window frames expand and contract with heat, and cold, and humidity changes. One object of the invention is to provide a construction in which the sashes are nicely balanced by the springs, regardless of temperature or humidity.

A further object of this invention is to provide window constructions of the above character removably accommodating standard window sash units without requiring extensive customer millwork on the sash units.

Another object is to provide a sash guide construction giving extra leverage to the housewife when she wants to remove a sash, for to do so in any spring guideway construction, both the frictional sealing pressure and the pressure of the balancing springs must be overcome, and with former constructions, this has been diflicult. And, it is a further object to provide such additional leverage and provide improved sealing, and balancing.

Another object is to provide window sash guides of the above character which are economical to fabricate and convenient to assemble and install.

Another object of this invention is to provide window construction of the above character wherein the inner or lower, and outer or upper, sashes of the window unit may be tilted and turned inwardly, individually, about a pivot point at or near their lower edges, being at the same time fully supported by the locking mechanism in this tilted or turned position. This offers a convenient means of making the exterior surfaces of both upper and lower sash readily accessible for cleaning, painting, or other maintenance without the need for strain or heavy lifting while removing the sash.

Another object of this invention is to provide a selflocking and automatically releasing sash balance, which must lock itself at any time the lower or upper sash is tilted out of the opening. Also, the locking device is of simpler, less expensive, and a more rugged construction, and of more positive and non-slipping action than previous locking devices used in self-locking sash balances. This is accomplished by using only one moving part which is operated by a pressure on the locking member without requiring the aid of an auxiliary spring.

Another object is to provide a self-locking automatically releasing sash balance of the foregoing character wherein none of the parts require customer fitting, and wherein the assembly is accomplished by merely inserting the locking member and balance spring in the sash guideway.

Another object is to provide a locking member for the above-mentioned sash balance wherein the locking member requires a minimum of sharpness in edges, or comers, but suificient for definite positive locking action. Heretofore, any extreme sharpness caused indentation and consequent sash guide channel mutilation during engagement.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a front elevation view, drawn in perspective, of a window with the lower sash in position to insert, or remove, from the window frame.

FIG. 2 is a horizontal cross sectional view of a jamb liner and upper and lower sash (with sash bracket place), and the self-locking sash carrier in the released, normal, operating position.

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary front elevation of a removable sash window installation equipped with the self-locking, automatically releasing, sash balance of the present invention.

FIG. 4 is a fragmented side view of the frame as seen from line X-X, of FIG. 3, showing the sash carrier.

FIG. 5 is a view of the sash balance and sash carrier in the normal, unlocked, operating, position.

FIG. 6 is the same view of the sash balance and sash carrier in the locked position.

FIG. 7 shows the upper sash bracket in place, before the diamond-shaped locating tab is removed.

FIG. 8 shows the lower sash bracket in place, with the diamond-shaped locating tab flush with the bottom edge of the sash.

FIG. 9 shows a cross section of the sash bracket.

3 FIG. shows a side elevation of the sash bracket, (not in place on the sash), in perspective.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring to the drawings in detail, FIG. 1 shows a removable sash window installation consisting generally of a window frame 30, and two resiliently mounted jamb liners, or sash guides 12, which are made of extruded plastic, and shaped so as to serve many purposes, which will be more fully described hereafter. The sash carrierlocks 14 (FIGS. 2 and 4) are guided vertically within the jamb liner 12 by channel 51 formed by walls 45 and 27, shown in FIG. 2. Part of the wall of 27 is undercut in order to restrain movement in any direction except along the axis of the channel guideway. Thus, positive guide action is given sash and 16 by the jamb liner 12. At the same time, the jamb liner .12 serves as a casing or housing for the balancing spring 13, thus allowing guided vertical movement of sash carrier locks 14-. The flexible leaves L L L and L, of FIG. 2, bearing against sash 15 and 16 (FIG. 2), act as an excellent weather sealant as well as a resilient vertical guideway for sashes 15 and 16 (FIG. 2).

The removable upper window sash 15 has a conventional frame 30, window pane 33, etc. (FIG. 1). However, the side rails and 3 8 have a milled groove 8 extending their entire length to accommodate the sash guide bracket 11 (shown in FIGS. 2, 7, 8, 9, 10). leaves L L L and L of FIG. 2 of sash guide 12 (FIGS. 3, 4, 5, 6), because of their flexing action, in both a horizontal and vertical direction exert forces against the sides a, 40b, 40c and 40d of milled groove 8, shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. These forces provide an excellent weather sealing action for both upper and lower sash 15 and 16 (FIG. 1). These forces also have the very important function of holding the sash in their normal operating position in the jamb liner :12 preventing any motion of sash towards the interior of the building, caused by any exterior wind action. The particular design of leaves L L L and L, of FIG. 2 is thus important to the weather sealing action and to the positive guideway mechanical resisting force acting against exterior wind forces.

Referring to FIG. 1, a small inward force exerted on the top rail 39 of lower sash 16 will easily tilt and rotate, the sash into the room interior. This motion of the sash inward deflects leaves L and L inward, and towards the frame jamb, flexing the leaves because of their resilient nature. The surfaces 40a and 40b of the milled groove 8 (FIGS. 1 and 2) of the lower sash 16, when tilted, will cam the leaves L and L inward. This action of the leaves L and L allowing tilting and rotation, of the sash 16 while still being securely held in any desired position for maintenance by the locking mechanism, is a most important feature. Sash 16 may be removed completely, if necessary. In a similar manner, upper sash 15 may also be tilted or removed. Return of lower or upper sash to their normal operating positions is done by reversing the tilting or removal process. In FIG. 2, part 46a is a flange, an integral part of the jamb liner, that serves the purpose of preventing any sash movement to the exterior of the building. In FIG. 2, part 46b is a smaller flange similar to part 46a but of lesser depth and serves the purpose of limiting the compression travel distance of the resilient compressible foam 59 (or other compressible material) against the frame jamb. The resilient compressible foam (or other compressible. material) lines the iamb liner vertically from top to bottom, serving as a positive weather seal in addition to providing a resilient compressible area between the jamb liner 12 and frame of the window. Considering further action of the leaves L and L of FIG. 2, when the sash 16 is in its normal operating position, any motion of the sash, inward or outward of the building, is effectively prevented by the fairly steep sided angles of part 131 of L and part 134 of L acting against surfaces 40a and 40b respectively of the milled groove 8 of lower sash 16. In a like manner parts 136 of L and 139 of L function, or act, against surfaces 40c and 40d of a similar milled groove for the upper sash. Thus, any forces acting over and in a perpendicular direction to the sash 15 and 16 will be distributed over the entire vertical length of the jamb liner, preventing inward or outward motion of the window sash because of the vertical, as well as horizontal, resiliency of leaves L L L and L In the tilting action, an optimum force, for the average housewife, exerted at the top edge of the sash will easily cam part 40b over part 134 of L and a further tilting surface 46b encounters an angle of part 132 of L which is considerably less steep and leaves L and L are easily deflected downward or inward toward the frame jamb, allowing free passage for the tilting action. The force required for tilting the sash is considerably smaller than the force that may be exerted when the sash is in normal operating position. The less steep angles formed by parts 132 and 133 of leaves 1 and 2 allow for clearance for bracket 11. In a similar manner, upper sash 15 is held in securely, or may be tilted for maintenance by the same procedure outlined above. It is advisable to tilt lower sash 16 out first before operating an upper sash 15 to prevent any hazard to the operator or the. sash.

The removable upper window sash 15 is disposed within a conventional window frame 30 which has the usual side members 30a30a, interconnected by a top member, or header, 3-1, and a bottom member, or sill, 3-2 (FIG. 1), and the upper and lower sashes 15 and 16 are equipped with the usual window panes, or lights, 33. The upper sash 15 is provided with a top rail 34 and opposite side stiles 2525, and bottom, or meeting rail 36. The lower sash 16 is provided with the usual bottom rail 37 and opposite side stiles 38-38, and a top rail, or meeting rail 39.

FIG. 3 shows a fragmentary front elevation of a removable sash window installation employing the selflocking, automatic releasing, sash balance of the present invention, on a sash.

FIG. 4 is a fragmented cross section of FIG. 3 as through lines X-X. This cross section shows the tongue 21 of sash guide bracket 11 (as shown in FIG. 2), and balance spring 13 in position, with the upper loop 26 of balance spring 13 hooked over the upper edge of sash guide 12 (as shown in FIG. 3), and the lower loop 49 in the slot 28 of sash carrier lock 14-, in the normal operating position.

In assembling this part of the present invention (refer to FIGS. 1 and 2), the upper sash 1 5 and lower sash 16 are trimmed equally and square, reducing their modular Width to that which will properly permit accommodation of sashes and sash guides 12 within window frame 30. Then, the side stiles of both upper sash 15 and lower sash 16 are machined, or plowed, to provide grooves 8, centered in the stiles, of appropriate size and shape to properly mate with leaves L L L and L, of the sash guides 12. The sash brackets 1'1 are then attached to upper sash 15, (refer to FIGS. 8 and 10'), by driving them in with a hammer, after first centering them in the grooves 8 by means of centering ribs 93 (FIG. 8), with the bracket arm 19 (FIG. 10), flush with the bottom edge of sash 15. After the bracket 11 is attached to the sash, diamond shaped locating tab 42, (shown in FIGS. 7 and 8), is removed, preferably by means of a hammer blow on the extreme outer end. The sash brackets 11 are then attached to the lower sash in the same way, except that the diamond locating tabs 42 are placed flush with the bottom of the sash to properly locate the brackets. The diamond shaped tabs 42 then may, or may not, be removed, as desired.

The operation of these parts can best be described with reference to FIGS. 5 and 6. FIG. 5 shows a lower sash 16 (as shown in FIG. 3) in normal operating position,

and FIG. 6 shows the lower sash 16 in a locked position,- the sash being in a horizontal orientation prependicular to the window opening.

The sash bracket 11 (as shown in FIG. 4), with tongue 21, when in the operating position, lies horizontally in the slot 17 of sash carrier 14, (as shown in FIG. 5), with one side of tongue 21 contacting vertical surface 70 of fin 27 (FIG. 2), and the opposite side of tongue 21 contacing surface 74 of sash carrier 14. This causes an orientation of sash carrier 14 such that smooth sliding surface 71 is in contact with surface 85 of the walls of guideway 12, and sash carrier 14 is in a non-wedging orientation in which it is free to move along the axis of the guideway, in cooperation with tongue 21 of bracket 11, and the sash to which the bracket is mounted.

When the sash is tilted, the tongue 21 of sash bracket 11 tilts with it, and rotates thus allowing the upward force of balance spring 13 to rotate the sash carrier 14 about the edge 87 (FIG. 6) of tongue 21 as an initial fulcrum point, causing edge 72 of sash carrier 14 to contact surface 85 and surface 69 of sash carrier 14 to contact surface 70 of fin 27, at which contact, edge 72 becomes the fulcrum point under the force of spring 13, causing wedging of surface 69 and sash carrier 14 in the guideway, thus locking the sash carrier 14 against the upward force of the spring 13, and permitting removal of the tongue 21 of bracket 11 from sash carrier 14, and consequently removal of the sash, to which bracket 11 is mounted, from the guideways and window unit, or alternatively, the orientation of the sash in a position out of the window unit frame, but with its lower edge supported in the frame, and locked against movement under force of balance spring 13.

When sash bracket 11, with tongue 21 is oriented in position (as shown in FIG. 6), the tongue 21 is readily removed from the sash carrier 14 by tipping one side of the sash to raise tongue 21 upward, and out of the slot 17, and subsequently from channel 51, and through slot 100 between leaves L and L of sash guideway 12 (FIG. 2). The opposite tongue 21 may then be removed from opposite sash carrier 14, and sash guideway 12, by pulling it through channel 51 and slot 100, thus freeing the sash from the guideways for removal from the window unit. The same procedure is followed with upper sash 15, if both sashes are to be removed from the window unit.

To reinsert the sashes, the procedure is reversed, with the upper sash 15 being inserted first. Sash 15 is held in a horizontal position with lower end toward the window frame opening, and with one side of the sash cocked higher than the other to permit entry into the width of the window frame, so that the extending tongues 21 of brackets 11 will pass into the opening without contacting the guideways 12. With tongues 21 aligned with appropriate exterior slots 100 of guideways 12, the sash 15 is levelled so that the tongues 21 enter through the slots 100, and into channels 51, above the sash carriers 14. The sash brackets 11 may then be lowered to enter tongues 21 into the slots 17 of sash carriers 14, and with the tongues 21, as fulcrum points, the sash 15 is tilted into vertical orientation with the grooves 8, locking into engagement with leaves L and L The tongues 21 revolve into horizontal orientation in sash carriers 14, thus unlocking the sash carriers 14 to permit free movement. Alternatively, with the tongues 21 entered into channels 51, above the sash carriers 14, the sash 15 may then be tilted into vertical orientation with grooves 8 locking into engagement with leaves L of the guideways 12. Sash 15 may then be lowered, with tongues 21 moving into contact with, and along camming surfaces 92 of sash carriers 14, camming the sash carrier into unlocked orientation, and permitting entry, past locking hook 94, into slot 17. With tongue 21 oriented (as shown in FIG. 5), sash carrier 14 is in unlocked orientation, and the locking hook 94 is so oriented that tongue 21 cannot pass between hook 94 and surface 70, thus effectively preventing accidental disengagement of tongue 21 from sash carrier 14, during momentary hindrance of travel of the sash carrier 14, due to dirt, etc., in channel 51.

The same procedure is followed with sash 16 in the inner channels of guideways 12.

Since proper placement of the sash guide bracket 11 in the sash is necessary, FIG. 7 shows the bracket 11 in place in an upper sash 15, and FIG. 8 shows the bracket 11 in place in a lower sash 16. FIG. 9 shows a cross section of the sash bracket 11, showing the built-in holding members. As shown in FIG. 10, sash guide bracket 11, which cooperates with sashes 15 and 16, and sash carrier 14 (shown in FIG. 4), to provide the automatic locking action of the present invention, consists of a bracket body 41 having a tongue 21 extending from the lower section thereof, with diamond locating tab 42, and guiding and securing members 43, and pins 44. To install sash bracket 11 onto sashes 15 and 16, an operator need only drive bracket 11 into place at the lower side of the sash, where it is guided accurately into place by guiding members 43, with locating ribs 93, and securely held in place by pins 44. When the sash bracket 11 has thus accurately and securely been set in place in the groove, tabl 42 may be removed by a blow from a hammer, or by simple bending. Tab 42 serves the simple purpose of guiding the bracket onto the correct position on the sash (as shown in FIGS. 7 and 9). Thus, in the instllation of the upper sash (FIG. 7), the guiding members 43, with locating ribs 93, automatically position the sash bracket 11 with respect to the milled groove 8, when the tongue 21 is flush with the bottom edge of sash 15. The locating ribs 93 are slightly wider than the milled groove 8, and so will fit snugly in the milled groove, with slight finger pressure for more accurate position, or locating. It also may be noted that the securing and guiding members 43 curve slightly when driven into the wood of the milled groove 8 of the sash. This assures a very secure fastening. Sash bracket 11 can be driven accurately into operating position by a single blow of the installers hammer and, as mentioned before, tab 42 may be removed by a blow, or by bending. With respect to lower sash 16 (FIG. 8), the sash bracket 11 is automatically and precisely located when the diamond shaped locating tab 42 is alinged flush with the inclined bottom rail 37 (FIG. 1), and guiding members 43 (FIG. 10) are inserted within the milled groove 8 of the lower sash. Sash bracket 11 may then be driven into its precise operating position, and tab 42 may be removed.

It will thus be seen that there has been provided by this invention retaining, guiding, and balancing mechanisms for removable window sashes. successfully achieving the various objects hereinabove set forth, together with many thoroughly practical advantages. As many possible embodiments may be made of the above invention, and as many changes might be made in the embodiment set forth above, it is to be understood that all matter hereinbefore set forth, or shown in the accompanying drawings, is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

It is also to be understood that the following claims are intended to cover all of the generic and specific features of the invention herein described, and all statements of the scope of the invention which, as a matter of language, might be said to fall therebetween.

We claim:

1. In a slidable window assembly,

at least one vertically extending resilient sash guideway having a vertically extending slot therein,

at least one other sash guideway, and at least one removable window sash having a fixed tongue, mounted therebetween,

a resilient sash balance and a rotatable sash carrier,

said resilient sash balance being fixed at one end with respect to said guideway, and eccentrically attached to said rotatable sash carrier at the other end,

said sash carrier slidably disposed between opposing carrier contacting surfaces,

and said rotatable sash carrier having a friction edge and a sliding surface on one side, and on the other side a wedging surface,

said rotatable sash carrier being rotated in response to the rotation of the said removable sash having said fixed tongue,

said friction edge engaging one opposing carrier contacting surface, and the wedging surface engaging the other opposing contacting surface, in locking engagement,

said fixed tongue being greater in width than height, and the width of said fixed tongue being sufficient to rotate said carrier out of locking engagement with said opposing contacting surface when said removable sash is rotated, and said tongue is brought into contact with an opposing carrier contact surface and an opposing carrier surface.

said tongue maintaining said carrier and said opposing contact surface in spaced relationship when said carrier is in the slideable operating position.

2. Sash guiding and balancing apparatus including a resilient sash balance,

a guideway for a window sash,

a rotatable sash carrier,

a removeable sash having a fixed tongue,

said resilient sash balance being fixed at one end with respect to said guideway, and eccentrically attached to said rotatable sash carrier at the other end,

said sash carrier slidably disposed between opposing carrier contacting surfaces,

and said rotatable sash carrier having a friction edge and a sliding surface on one side, and on the other side a wedging surface,

said rotatable sash carrier being rotated in response to the rotation of the said removable sash having said fixed tongue,

said friction edge engaging one opposing carrier con tacting surface, and the wedging surface engaging the other opposing contacting surface, in locking engagement,

said fixed tongue being greater in width than height, and the width of said fixed tongue being sufiicient to rotate said carrier out of locking engagement with said opposing contacting surface when said removable sash is rotated, and said tongue is brought into contact with an opposing carrier contact surface and and opposing carrier surface.

3. Sash guiding and balancing apparatus for removable sashes, comprising:

a sash guideway,

a rotatable sash carrier having a contacting friction edge on one side of said rotatable sash carrier which engages one side of an opposing carrier contacting surface, and a wedging surface on the opposite side of said rotatable sash carrier wherein said contacting friction edge serves as a fulcrum in response to the force exerted by an eccentrically located balance means to cause rotation of said rotatable carrier into frictional engagement with an opposing carrier c011- tacting surface,

and said rotatable sash carrier having a tongue contacting surface,

said guideway having opposing carrier contacting surfaces,

sash balancing means having one end attached to said carrier and other end fixed with respect to said sash guideway,

and a slideable sash engaging said sash guideway,

said balancing means being attached to said carrier eccentrically for rotating said carrier between said opposing carrier contacting surfaces,

said sash being rotatable out of engagement with said guideway, and said sash having a fixed tongue extending from the side of said sash which rotates with said sash,

said tongue having a width greater than its height, the width of said tongue being suflicient to rotate said carrier out of locking engagement with the said opposing carrier contacting surface, and to maintain said carrier in a non-locked, sliding orientation, when one side of said tongue is rotated into contact with one of the opposing carrier contacting surfaces,

and the opposite side of said tongue is rotated into contact with said carrier tongue contacting surface,

and when said sides of said tongue are rotated out of contact with said carrier contacting surface, said carrier is rotated into frictional contact with said opposing carrier contacting surfaces to maintain said carrier in locked nonsliding orientation.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,012,292 12/1961 Brengman 49181 XR 3,124,849 3/1964 Osten 49181 XR 3,184,784 5/1965 Peters 49181 XR 3,233,278 2/1966 Lundgren 49-481 XR 3,349,518 10/1967 Johnson 49181 XR KENNETH DOWNEY, Primary Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3012292 *Feb 11, 1959Dec 12, 1961Malta Mfg CompanyRemovable window with sash counterbalance locking device
US3124849 *Oct 11, 1960Mar 17, 1964 Spring-balance-mounted removable sash window
US3184784 *Feb 8, 1962May 25, 1965Lowell E PetersReceptacle for window sash pivot lock
US3233278 *Mar 23, 1964Feb 8, 1966Herbert K LundgrenWindow sash mounting
US3349518 *Oct 4, 1965Oct 31, 1967Weather Seal IncRemovable window with sash balance lock
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3724131 *Mar 13, 1972Apr 3, 1973Wenco IncTilt-take-out window assembly
US3797168 *Oct 21, 1971Mar 19, 1974Trout DAutomatically-locking positively-unlocked sash balance
US4271631 *Mar 28, 1979Jun 9, 1981Trout Donald MSelf-locking automatically-releasing sash balance for tiltably-removable sliding sash windows
US4452012 *Aug 9, 1982Jun 5, 1984Caldwell Manufacturing CompanyPivot shoe for sash balance
US4610108 *Dec 20, 1984Sep 9, 1986Marshik Gary JBalance spring locking slide block for tilt-out windows
US4779380 *Jun 5, 1987Oct 25, 1988Caldwell Manufacturing CompanySpring cover friction system for sash balance
US4799333 *Sep 22, 1987Jan 24, 1989Caldwell Manufacturing CompanyLock shoe system for take-out window
US4837976 *Mar 21, 1988Jun 13, 1989Caldwell Manufacturing CompanyWindow balance spring cover friction system
US4887389 *Mar 16, 1988Dec 19, 1989Newell Manufacturing CompanyTilt lock jambliner and slidable block
US5033235 *Apr 27, 1990Jul 23, 1991Newell Manufacturing CompanyWindow jamb liner with concealed spring pocket and friction slide
US5077939 *Nov 27, 1990Jan 7, 1992Sealrite Windows, Inc.Cam pivot for full tilt double-hung windows
US5189838 *Jun 10, 1992Mar 2, 1993Caldwell Manufacturing CompanyTilt sash lock shoe system
US5237775 *Dec 30, 1992Aug 24, 1993L.B. Plastics LimitedSliding mechanism for window constructions
US5243783 *Jun 24, 1992Sep 14, 1993Andersen CorporationLocking slide block
US5301467 *Sep 2, 1993Apr 12, 1994Andersen CorporationLocking slide block
US5371971 *May 4, 1993Dec 13, 1994Ashland Products, Inc.Sash balance brake and pivot pin assembly
US5542212 *Apr 14, 1995Aug 6, 1996Outlook Window Partnership L.P.locking terminal for full tilt double-hung windows
US5544450 *Aug 7, 1992Aug 13, 1996Andersen CorporationDouble-hung tilting sash type window system
US5546702 *Apr 20, 1995Aug 20, 1996Caldwell Manufacturing CompanyAdjustable brace for window sash
US5566507 *Jun 7, 1995Oct 22, 1996Andersen CorporationDouble-hung tilting sash type window system
US5657579 *Oct 19, 1994Aug 19, 1997Andersen CorporationMethod and apparatus for securing a sash within a frame
US6178695 *Mar 29, 1999Jan 30, 2001Carolina Builders, Inc.Convertible window assembly
US6279270 *Nov 12, 1999Aug 28, 2001Newell Manufacturing CompanyWindow jamb liner
US6718693Jan 16, 2002Apr 13, 2004Newell Industrial CorporationWindow tilt latch
US7937809 *May 7, 2008May 10, 2011Caldwell Manufacturing Company North America, LLCDynamic window jamb channel block
US9650822 *Mar 17, 2014May 16, 2017Pella CorporationFenestration unit with sash retention
US20050193631 *Mar 8, 2004Sep 8, 2005Gary MarshikBalance shoe for tilt-in window sashes
US20090277097 *May 7, 2008Nov 12, 2009Caldwell Manufacturing CompanyDynamic Window Jamb Channel Block
US20140259944 *Mar 17, 2014Sep 18, 2014Pella CorporationFenestration unit with sash retention
US20150052818 *Apr 23, 2014Feb 26, 2015Steven Robert AbramsonDraft guard
Classifications
U.S. Classification49/181, 49/431, 49/445
International ClassificationE06B3/44
Cooperative ClassificationE06B2003/4446, E06B3/5063, E06B3/44
European ClassificationE06B3/50G2, E06B3/44