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Publication numberUS3526006 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 1, 1970
Filing dateMay 1, 1968
Priority dateMay 1, 1968
Publication numberUS 3526006 A, US 3526006A, US-A-3526006, US3526006 A, US3526006A
InventorsBeardmore Robert L
Original AssigneeBeardmore Robert L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wrist extensor operated hand splint
US 3526006 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 1, 1970 R. L. BEARDMORE 3,526,006

WRIST EXTENSOR OPERATED HAND SPLINT 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed May 1, 1968 INVENTOR 1605667 1. @'AEflA/df BY v 5% 5 A TEE/V66 R. L. BEARDMORE WRIST EXTENSOR OPERATED HAND SPLINT Sept. 1, 1970 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 1, 1968 INVENTOR- 55A0MOF Sept. 1, 1970 R. L. BEARDMORE 3,526,005

WRIST EXTENSOR OPERATED HAND SPLINT Filed May 1, 1968 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTR. 605667 A. fiAEfiMdE A TTOE/VEV? United States Patent O 3,526,006 WRIST EXTENSOR OPERATED HAND SPLINT Robert L. Beardmore, 1719 Wright St., Pomona, Calif. 91766 Filed May 1, 1968, Ser. No. 725,671 Int. Cl. A61f N06 US. Cl. 3-12 4 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE This patent describes a novel wrist extensor operated hand splint adapted to be carried on the hand and lower forearm comprising two smooth parts; the first of said parts having a forward portion which has a contour conforming generally to the curvature of the palm and fingers of a hand when the fingers are partially extended, extending upwardly from said contoured portion, a retaining portion adapted to pass between the thumb and forefinger and terminate at a point at the top of the hand, extending laterally from said contoured portion a relatively small curved member adapted to support the thumb, extending from the rear of said contoured portion a normally straight springy resilient member which at its free end has a means for making a pivot able connection; the second of said parts having a forward portion provided with one or more projections for use in the holding of objects, the rear portion of said second part being adapted to abut the underside of the arms and having at each side thereof oppositely curved surfaces adapted to wrap around said lower forearm and spaced longitudinally so that said forearm can pass therebetween when said second part is being put on, the rear portion of said second part also being provided with a means for making a pivotable connection; said means for making a pivotable connection on said first and second parts being adapted to join together to provide a closing gripping action between the edges of said forward portions of said parts to enable the grasping of objects therebetween. This patent also describes a supporting means for said device which facilitates the putting on and aking off of said splint.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention pertains to wrist operated hand splints. Certain types of back injuries are known to result in the paralysis of the hand so that the hand cannot be closed. In addition, the hand is unable to exert down.- ward pressure although it is possible to raise the hand and to rotate the forearm. In order to cope with the handicap resulting from this condition, various splints have been proposed. In the conventional tenodesis splint, as described in The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, volume 47A, No. 3 at pages 533 to 536, the fingers are pulled toward the thumb by a connecting lever arm, which is attached to steel finger rings and extends past the wrist to be attached to the side of the forearm brace. When the patient extends his rist, a three-jaw-chuck type of finger flexion occurs. The rings of this structure produces pressure on the fingers which can result in pressure sores when the patient attempts to use the device for prolonged periods. The weight of the splint also tires the marginally functional wrist and thereby prevents or impedes movement. In addition, the splint is difficult for the patients to take on and off and its appearance is difiicult for many patients to accept. More recently, a plastic tenodesis splint was developed. This device provides a three-jaw-chuck type of grasp using the tenodesis principle. All mechanical joints are eliminated and the patients own joints are used. The splint consists of three laminated plastic parts: the finger shell which stabilizes "ice the middle and distal phalangeal joints of the index and long fingers; the thumb post, which holds the thumb in abduction and opposition so that the pulps of the thumb and the index and long fingers meet as the fingers flex; and the wrist cuff, which is the anchor point above the mobile wrist joint. The cuff is kept closed by Velcro straps which are adjustable. This device represents somewhat of an improvement in the art, however, the device is still rather difficult to put on, and some patients are unable to either put on or take off the splint without assistance. In addition, the device is rather unsightly. According to the present invention, there is now provided a novel wrist operated hand splint providing many advantages over the splints in current use. According to the present invention, the splint of this invention can be put on and taken off by the patient unassisted. The device of the present invention also eliminates the need for combersome straps and joints and other arrangements Working on a strictly mechanical principle, as well as providing many other advantages discussed hereinafter.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Briefly, the present invention comprises a novel wrist extensor operated hand splint adapted to be carried on the hand and lower forearm comprising two smooth parts; the first of said parts having a forward portion which has a contour conforming generally to the curvature of the palm and fingers of a hand when the fingers are partially extended, extending upwardly from said contoured portion, a retaining portion adapted to pass between the thumb and forefinger and terminate at a point at the top of the hand, extending laterally from said contoured portion a relatively small curved member adapted to support the thumb, extending from the rear of said contoured portion a normally straight springy resilient member which at its free end has means for making a pivotable connection; the second of said parts having a forward portion provided with one or more projections for use in the holding of objects, the rear portion of said second part being adapted to abut the underside of the arm and having at each side thereof oppositely curved surfaces adapted to wrap around said lower forearm and spaced longitudinally so that said forearm can pass therebetween when said second part is being put on, the rear portion of said second part also being provided with a means for making a pivotable connection; said means for making a pivotable connection on said first and second parts being adapted to join to gether to provide a closing gripping action between the edges of said forward portions of said parts to enable the grasping of objects therebetween. This patent also describes a supporting means for said devices which facilitates the putting on and taking off of said splint.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a novel simplified hand splint which is easier for the afilicted to use.

More particularly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a two-part hand splint free of cumbersome straps and mechanical joints.

Still another object of the present invention is the provision of a hand splint which can be put on and taken off without assistance.

Yet another object of the present invention is the provision of a hand splint which is inconspicuous to wear.

These and other objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the more detailed description which follows.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Turning to the drawings: FIG. 1 shows a perspective view of the wrist extensor operated hand splint of the present invention when not 3 in use and resting on a base especially adapted for the splint.

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken along the line 2-2 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the base shown in FIG. 1 with the hand splint removed therefrom.

FIG. 4 shows the first step in the putting on of the splint.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the palm of the hand with the one part of the splint in place.

FIG. 5A is a sideview and partial section showing the one part of the splint on the hand as it is lifted from the base member preliminary to the putting on of the other part of the splint.

FIG. 6 shows the next phase in putting on the splint.

FIG. 7 shows still a latter step in the putting on of the splint.

FIG. 8 shows the splint in place on the arm with the ends of the two parts of the splint in the closed position. 7

FIG. 9 shows the splint in place on the arm with the ends of the two parts in an open position.

Discussing the drawings in greater detail, FIG. 1 shows the first part of the splint 10 and the second part of the splint 12 resting on the support 14 having a base 16 and a pedestal 18. The pedestal is equipped with a special retaining member 20 which aids in holding the second part 12 of the splint in place.

The first part 10 of the splint has a forward portion 22 which has a contour conforming to the palm and fingers of the hand when the fingers are partially extended to form with the palm a generally uniformly curved surface. The retaining portion 24 extends upwardly from the contoured portion and is adapted to pass between the thumb and forefinger and terminate at a point 26 on the top of the hand. Extending laterally from the contoured portion 22 is the relatively small curved member 28 adapted to support the thumb. Extending from the rear of the contoured portion 22 is a normally straight springy resilient member 30 which is provided with a rivet hook 32 at its rear extremity.

The second part 12 of the splint has a forward portion 34 provided with projections 36, 38 and 40 for use in aiding the holding of various objects. The rear portion 42 of the part 12 is adapted to abut the underside of the arm and has at each side thereof, oppositely opposed curved surfaces 44 and 46 adapted to wrap around the lower forearm. The curved surface members 44 and 46 are longitudinally spaced so that the forearm can pass between them when the device is put on, as is clearly depicted in FIG. 6. The rear portion 42 of the part 12 is provided with a hole 48 which is just slightly larger in diameter than the shank portion of rivethook 32 so that when the two parts are joined together as shown in FIGS. 8 and 9, a pivotable connection is formed which is snug enough to maintain the rivet hook in the hole 48 while permitting free rotation thereabout.

The support member is a functional part of the present invention in that it not only serves as a convenient means of storing the device when it is not in use, but is so constructed as to materially aid the patient in the putting on and taking off of the splint. Thus, the pedestal 18 is provided not only with the element 20 to aid in holding part 12 in place but is also provided with peg 50 which prevents the rotation of part 12 during the putting on and taking off of the device. Similarly, the pedestal is provided with hole 52 in which the shank of rivet hook 32 is received. The pair of upstanding peg-like members 54 and 56 also prevent the rotation of the member 10 during the putting on and taking off of the device.

In practice, the hand is simply slipped forward starting with the fingers at the rear portion, and toward the forward portion of the member 10. Normally, the patient affiicted with the type of back injury requiring a hand splint is characterized by hands which are somewhat cupped and the fingers of which he is unable to completely straighten out or extend. However, this does not pose any problems since, by simply placing his hand palm down on top of part 10 on the pedestal, he can gradually as shown in FIG. 4, slide his hand forward until the thumb and forefinger are in place as is shown in FIG. 5. Thereafter, the forearm is raised, carrying part 10 therewith, and the forearm is then lowered between longitudinally spaced members 44 and 46 as shown in FIG. 6 and the arm gradually rotated about as shown in FIG. 7 while the rivet book 32 is inserted in the hole 48 to make up the pivotal connection. The hole 58 in member 20 also accommodates the shank of rivet hook 32 to facilitate the forming of the pivotal connection.

Once the splint is in place as shown in FIG. 8, the opening and closing of the two members for grasping purposes is accomplished by simply the raising and lowering of the hand using the muscles which extend from the back of the hand up the forearm. In this way, any number of devices and articles can be held. The various protrusions 36, 38 and 40 on the member 12 can be utilized to hold odd-shaped objects such as pencils and forks. Further, the members 10 and 12 can be sufiiciently opened as shown in FIG. 9 to permit the holding of a bottle or a glass in the opening 60 therebetween.

The function of the resilient portion 30 is to cause a closing force between the forward edges of members 10 and 12 to give the necessary gripping action which the patient is unable to supply. As is indicated above, the patient in need of a hand splint can raise the hand at the wrist but cannot press down with it. For this reason he has no difficulty in overcoming the force of the resilient spring in opening the device, but needs the self-recovery force of the resilient member in order to provide grasping action once the device has been opened and caused to engage the particular object which he wishes to lift.

As will be immediately apparent to those skilled in the art, the new splint of this invention provides many advantages over those currently in use. The patient canput it on himself without having to have someone aid him. A suit coat fits smoothly over it since there is a minimum of bulk. The device is adapted to be manufactured in several basically standard sizes which, with only minor fitting, can be adjusted to the precise fit of any given hand and arm.

Another advantage of the splint of this invention is that it is easy to clean. Normally, the device is made entirely of metal, and preferably, the device is made for lightness of weight entirely of aluminum except for the resilient portion 30 of part 10 which is made of spring steel.

Having fully described the invention, it is intended that it be limited only by the lawful scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A novel wrist extensor operated hand splint adapted to be worn on the hand and lower forearm comprising two smooth parts; the first of said parts having a forward portion which has a contour conforming generally to the curvature of the palm and fingers of a hand when the fingers are partially extended, extending upwardly from said contoured portion, a retaining portion adapted to pass between the thumb and forefinger and terminate at a point at the top of the hand, extending laterally from said contoured portion a relatively small curved member adapted to support the thumb, extending from the rear of said contoured portion a normally straight springy resilient member which at its free end has a means for making a pivotable connection; the second of said parts having a forward portion provided with one or more projections for use in the holding of objects, the rear portion of said second part being adapted to abut the underside of the arm and having at each side thereof oppositely curved surfaces adapted to wrap around said lower forearm and spaced longitudinally so that said forearm can pass therebetween when said second part is being put on, the rear portion of said second part also being provided with a means for making a pivotable connection; said means for making a pivotable connection on said first and second parts being adapted to join together to provide a closing gripping action between the edges of said forward portions of said parts to enable the grasping of objects therebetween.

2. The hand splint of claim 1 wherein all of the device except the straight springy resilient member is made of aluminum and said straight springy resilient member is made of spring steel.

3. The hand splint of claim 1 in combination with a support member therefor.

4. A novel wrist extensor operated hand splint adapted to be worn on the hand and lower forearm in combination with a support member therefor, said splint comprising two smooth parts, first of said parts having a forward portion which has a contour conforming generally to the curvature of the palm and fingers of the hand when the fingers are partially extended, extending upwardly from said contoured portion a retaining portion adapted to pass between the thumb and forefinger and terminate at a point on top of said hand, extending laterally from said contoured portion a relatively small curved member adapted to support the thumb, extending from the rear of said contoured portion a normally straight springy resilient member which is provided at its rear end with a rivet hook, the shank of which extends through said resilient member and is secured thereto; the second of said parts having a forward portion provided with one or more projections for use in the holding of objects, the rear portion of said second part being adapted to abut the underside of the arm and have at each side thereof oppositely opposed curved surfaces adapted to wrap around said lower forearm but spaced longitudinally so that said forearm can pass therebetween when said second part is being put on, the rear portion of said second part being provided with a hole for receiving the shank of said rivet hook; said support comprising a base member having a pedestal; on said pedestal said first part and said second part of said splint; said pedestal being provided with a hole therein, the shank on the rivet hook on said first part of said splint being received in said hole, the resilient springy portion of said first part resting on the surface of said pedestal and the contoured portion of said first part of said splint projecting beyond said pedestal and hanging down therefrom, said pedestal also being provided with a curved retaining means and an upstanding peg disposed to hold said second part of second splint in place against rotational forces, said rear portion of said second part of said splint resting within said curved retaining means of said pedestal and the forward portion of said second part of said splint extending beyond and hanging down from said pedestal.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,553,277 5/1951 Robinson et a1. 31 2,885,686 5/1959 Giaimo 31.1 3,358,527 12/1967 Lake et a1. 312.8

FOREIGN PATENTS 572,358 11/ 1944 Great Britain.

OTHER REFERENCES The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, vol. 47-A, No. 3, pp. 533536.

RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner G. F. DUNNE, Assistant Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R. 3-12.8; 128-77

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2553277 *Jul 10, 1950May 15, 1951Gage Jr George SControl and operating means for paralyzed hands
US2885686 *Mar 23, 1954May 12, 1959Lionel CorpProsthetic devices
US3358527 *Sep 7, 1965Dec 19, 1967Louise Entpr IncWrist attachment and manual control for motor vehicles
GB572358A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4021866 *Sep 27, 1976May 10, 1977Wasko Joseph LHand prosthesis
US4488715 *Feb 28, 1983Dec 18, 1984Comeau Perry JApparatus for supporting the arm of a patient on an operating table
US4511272 *May 16, 1983Apr 16, 1985Jason W. BrownWriting prosthesis
US4782825 *May 21, 1987Nov 8, 1988Robert LonardoCombination arm splint and finger support means
US5256136 *Sep 28, 1992Oct 26, 1993Sucher Benjamin MCarpal tunnel appliance
US5383737 *Apr 16, 1993Jan 24, 1995Graphic Controls CorporationHand writing device
US5637078 *May 10, 1995Jun 10, 1997Restorative Care Of America IncorporatedResting hand orthosis
US5772620 *Aug 10, 1994Jun 30, 1998Beiersdorf AgHand and wrist joint orthosis
US5782784 *Feb 12, 1997Jul 21, 1998Restorative Care Of America IncorporatedHand orthosis with interchangeable thumb support
US5916186 *Jun 26, 1997Jun 29, 1999Medassist Op, Inc.Hand splint apparatus
US6808502 *Oct 23, 2002Oct 26, 2004Jimmy Phong Xuan NguyenCombination finger and wrist splint
Classifications
U.S. Classification623/57, 623/65, 602/21
International ClassificationA61F5/04, A61F5/058
Cooperative ClassificationA61F5/05866
European ClassificationA61F5/058H4B