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Publication numberUS3527297 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 8, 1970
Filing dateFeb 17, 1969
Priority dateFeb 17, 1969
Publication numberUS 3527297 A, US 3527297A, US-A-3527297, US3527297 A, US3527297A
InventorsTodd William L
Original AssigneeJerry L Pinkard
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stage cementer
US 3527297 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 8, 1970 w. L.. ToDD 3,527,297

STAGE CEMENTER Flued Feb. 17, 1969 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 lll INVENTOR. William I .TOdd

A TTORNEY Sept. 8, 1970 w. L. Tono 3,527,29 'l STAGE CEMENTER Filed Feb. 17, 1969 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 i" g 2 F?? xm e@ A M, El; zu 4 y 2 ./22 fg /22 H 41 &5' Q A ,v

` /82//20 if /35 f 24 ya w f/e Y u fj* 90 l 90 f 90 I 90 9040 f cl2' INVENTOR.

William I .Todd

W. L. TODD STAGE CEMENTEE sepa s, 1970 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 nl.. 4 M 4 .fl A?. l"

INVENTOR. W Hmm L Todd ATTORNEY United States Patent O 3,527,297 STAGE CEMENTER William Is. Todd, Los Angeles, Calif., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Jerry L. Pinkard, Fort Worth, Tex. Filed Feb. 17, 1969, Ser. No. 799,718 Int. Cl. EZlb 33/16 U.S. Cl. loe-IM l1 Claims ABSTRACT F THE DISCLOSURE A stage cementer to be positioned in a well bore consisting of a tubular body with circulation ports extending through the sides thereof and an inner sleeve slideably disposed in the tubular body, said inner sleeve having circulation ports through the sides thereof, whereby the inner sleeve may be manipulated by applying pressure at the well head to open and close ports in the body.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention is an improvement in stage cementers of the type disclosed in the patent to Schnitter, lat. No. 2,659,438, Means For Cementing Wells.

Stage cementers are used for cementing casing or pipe strings in bored holes, penetrating the earths strata, at more than one elevation along the vertical axis of the bored hole.

The stage cementer disclosed in the aforementioned patent to Schnitter offered distinct advantage over the prior art. However, the device offered an imperfect solution to problems existing at the time of its development and to new problems which have developed as a result of the use of new drilling techniques presently employed.

Stage cementers heretofore developed have utilized at least two sleeves slideably disposed in a tubular body for opening and closing circulation ports therein. The ports were formerly closed initially by a lower sleeve. The lower sleeve was then moved to a position below the ports, allowing cement slurry to flow between the upper end of the lower sleeve and the lower end of an upper sleeve into the circulation ports. The supper sleeve was then forced downwardly to close the circulation ports. The use of stage cementers employing lower and upper sleeves for opening and closing circulation ports was undesirable for several reasons.

When the lower sleeve was urged downwardly opening the circulation port, steel snap rings prevented any upward movement of the lower sleeve. It was impossible to test the device in the field because the snap rings could not be retracted.

To force the upper sleeve downwardly to close the circulation ports caused the cement slurry between the upper and lower sleeve to be compressed, making the upper sleeve diliicult to move.

Cement slurry was often forced into the space between the slideable sleeves and the body of the stage cementer, resulting in damage to seals. The damaged seals failed to hold pressure.

The upper sleeve also had steel snap rings to prevent backup of the upper sleeve which prevented testing of the device. The use of numerous precision parts in stage cementers, heretofore developed, resulted in excessive manufacturing cost because special machining and forming was required.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION l have developed a stage cementing device which utilizes one integral sleeve for opening and closing circulating ports thereby eliminating the major defects of stage cementing devices heretofore developed.

3,527,297, Patented Sept. 8, 1970 c ICC A primary object of the invention is to provide a stage cementing device having an integral sleeve for opening and closing circulation ports, thereby eliminating the possibility of the device malfunctioning as a result of cement restricting the movement of a shut-off sleeve.

Another object of the invention is to provide a stage cementing device which may be field tested to assure a leakproof seal after the casing is run in the hole.

A further object of the invention is to provide a stage cementing device which is inexpensive to manufacture.

Other and further objects of the invention will become apparent upon reading the detailed specication hereinafter following and by referring to the drawings annexed hereto.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The enclosed drawings of suitable embodiments of the invention are provided so that the invention may be better and more fully understood, in which:

FIG. I is a partially sectionalized elevation view of a typical installation of the stage cementing device carried by casing in a bore hole;

FIG. Il is a fragmentary perspective view of the upper end of the port sleeve with parts broken away to more clearly illustrate details of construction;

FIG. III is a cross sectional view through the stage cementing device with the port sleeve in the upward and closed position which it assumes during the casing running operation;

FIG. IV is a cross sectional view similar to FIG. III with the port sleeve in the intermediate or open position which it assumes for circulating cement;

FIG. V is a cross sectional view similar to FIG. III with the port sleeve in the down and closed position which it assumes after the cementing operation is completed;

FIG. VI is a cross sectional view taken along lines VI-VI of FIG. III;

FIG. VII is a cross sectional view taken along lines VII-VII of F IG. 1V;

FIG. VIII is an enlarged fragmentary cross sectional view taken through the seal rings which seal the space between the port sleeve and the body of the stage cementing device;

FIG. IX is an enlarged fragmentary cross sectional view of spring locks on the locking sleeve;

FIG. X is a top plan view of a modied form of the latching spring assembly; and

FIG. XI is an elevational view of the modied form of the latching spring assembly looking in the direction indicated by arrows XI-XI in FIG. X.

Like numerals designate like parts throughout the various figures of the drawing.

DESCRIPTION OF A PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to FIG. I of the drawing, the numeral 1 designates a bore hole in the strata of the earth having a string of casing 2 positioned therein. The stage cementing device generally designated by the numeral 4 is disposed at a predetermined level in the casing string intermediate opposite ends thereof. Various conventional tools such as stall collar assembly 6 and iloat assembly 8 may be installed in the casing string as needed for a specific cementing operation.

A cement head 10 is connected to casing 2 above the well opening.

The details of construction, operation and function of the stall collar 6, oat shoe 8 and cement head 10 are well known to persons skilled in the art and further description is not deemed necessary. However, Pat. No.

3 2,664,163 and Pat. No. 2,854,079 to Schnitter may be referred to for additional details.

Referring to FIG. III, stage cementing device 4 has a hollow tubular body 12 which comprises a general housing for the integral parts of the cementing device. Ports l14 are disposed in spaced apart circumferential relation about a central portion of body 12. Circulation passages 14 have a chamfer 16 formed on the inner edges thereof to increase the ilow rate of iluids therethrough and to allow ports 46 in port sleeve 44 to move without obstruction.

The upper end of body member 12 has threads 18, formed therein for receiving threads 20 on the lower end of upper body member 22. Suitable sealing means is provided to assure that the joint between threads 18 and 20 will not leak. In the particular embodiment illustrated in the drawing a weld 24 is provided around the upper ends of body 12 rigidly connecting same to a central portion of upper body member 22. O-ring seals 26 are positioned in annular grooves formed in the lower end of upper body member 22 and engage the inner surface of body member 12.

The upper end of upper body member 22 has threads 28 formed therein to facilitate connecting cementing device 4 to the lower end of a string of casing 2.

A shoulder 30 extends inwardly into the lower end of bore 32 of tubular body 12 for receiving an outwardly extending shoulder 33 formed adjacent the upper edge of lower body member 34 which is welded at 36 to the lower end of body member 12. Threads 38 are formed on the lower end of lower body member 34 allowing the lower end of the stage cementing device 4 to be connected to tubing string 2 by a collar 40.

The upper end of lower body member 34 has tapered slots 42 formed in spaced apart relation thereabout for receiving inner sleeve lugs 62 on the lower end of port sleeve 44, as will be hereinafter more fully explained.

A port sleeve 44 is slideably disposed in body 12 and has circulation ports 46 circumferentially disposed in spaced apart relation about a central portion thereof. Referring to FIG. IV, it should be noted that circulation ports 46 in port sleeve 44 and circulation passages 14 in tubular body 12 are arranged in like manner and the circulation ports in the respective sleeves coincide when port sleeve 44 is adjusted axially through body 12 to the desired position.

Seal rings 48, 50, 52 and 54 are seated in annular grooves formed in the outer surface 43 of port sleeve 44.

Shear screws 56 are removably secured in threaded holes 56a and 56b in body 12 and in port sleeve 44, re-

spectively, when port sleeve 44 is in the upper position illustrated in FIG. III of the drawing. It should be noted that shear screws 56 lock port sleeve 44 in position preventing axial movement thereof relative to body 12.

The lower end of port sleeve 44 has female threads 59 formed therein for receiving baffle 58 having male threads thereon. Batlle 58 has a bore 60 therethrough which is smaller in diameter than bore 45 which extends through port sleeve 44. Port sleeve baille 58 has a diverging cross section, forming a seat 61 adapted to receive a trip bomb 130 to close bore 60 therethrough as will be hereinafter more fully explained.

Lugs 62 extend downwardly from the lower edge of port sleeve 44 and are arranged to be received by slots 42 in the upper edge of lower body member 34 when port sleeve 44 is lowered as illustrated in FIG. V.

Port sleeve 44 has tapered slots 64 formed in its upper edge for receiving lugs 112 extending downwardly from the lower edge of the locking sleeve 78 as will be hereinafter more fully explained.

Latching springs 66 have the lower ends thereof anchored in annular groove 68 formed adjacent the upper end of port sleeve 44 (see FIG. II). Screws 72 extend through the holes in the lower ends of latching springs 66 and threadedly engage tapped holes 70 drilled in spaced l apart circumferential relation about the inner surface of annular grooves 68. Each latching spring 66 has a thickened portion 74 adjacent the upper end thereof which has a tapered lower edge 76.

A locking sleeve 78 is slideably disposed in body 12 above port sleeve 44 and has a bore 80 extending therethrough.

As best illustrated in FIG. III, locking sleeve 78 has female threads 82 in the upper end thereof which threadedly engage male threads on locking sleeve baille 84.

Locking sleeve baille 84 has a bore 86 extending therethrough which is smaller in diameter than bore which extends through locking sleeve 78 and bore 45 which extends through port sleeve `44. It should be noted, however, that bore 86 extending through baille 84 is larger in diameter than bore 60 which extends through port sleeve baille 58. Locking sleeve baille 84 has a diverging cross section forming a seat 88 on the upper side thereof.

Shear screw 90 extends through threaded hole 90a in body 12 and into hole 90b in locking sleeve 78. When shear screw 90 is inserted as illustrated in FIG. III, locking sleeve 78 is maintained in the upper position.

Seal rings 92 are disposed in annular grooves 94 and extend circumferentially around locking sleeve 78.

Locking sleeve 78 has a reduced portion 96 and has an upper spring lock and a lower spring lock 102 disposed in annular grooves 98 and 99 respectively, extending circumferentially around reduced portion 96, see FIGS. III and IX.

Spring locks 100 and 102 may assume various configurations. However, in a particular embodiment illustrated in the drawing spring locks 100 and 102 are illustrated as steel snap rings which automatically move outwardly from the respective grooves 98 and 99 to seat under a shoulder to prevent any upward movement of the locking sleeve as will be hereinafter more fully explained.

Locking sleeve 78 has a second reduced portion 104 formed therein below spring locks 100 and 102 for receiving the thickened portion 74 of the upper end of latching springs 66 which extend upwardly above the upper edge of port sleeve 44.

Locking sleeve 78 has a cam surface 106 on the lower end which is substantially equal in diameter to that of iirst reduced portion 96. Suitable guide means is provided on locking sleeve 78 to prevent rotation thereof relative to port sleeve 44. In the particular embodiment illustrated in the drawing, as best illustrated in FIGS. IV and VI, alignment pins 108 extend through openings in the wall of locking sleeve 78 into slots 110 between latching springs 66 which are anchored by screws 72 on port sleeve 44. It should be readily appreciated that alignment pin 108 allow port sleeve 44 and locking sleeve 78 to move axially, one relative to the other. However, alignment pins 108 prevent relative rotation of the said sleeves.

Locking lugs 112 extend downwardly from the lower edge of locking sleeve 78 and are adapted to be received by slots 64 in the upper edge of port sleeve '44 as locking sleeve 78 and port sleeve 44 move into enga-gement.

It should be noted that the bore 32 of body member 12 is straight and smooth except for shoulder 30 at the lower end thereof for receiving lower body member 34, locking groove 116 for receiving spring locks 100 and 102, and reduced portion 118 for receiving the thickened upper portion 74 of latching springs 66.

Locking groove 116 is formed in the inner surface of body member .12 and has an upper surface 120. Spring locks 100 and 102 snap outwardly into locking groove 116 as locking sleeve 78 is moved downwardly through bore 32 of body member 12. When spring locks 100 and 102 are shouldered under surface 120 of locking groove 116, locking sleeve 78 cannot move upwardly.

Reduced portion 118 formed in the upper end of body member i12 has a seat 122 formed at the lower end thereof arranged to receive the tapered lower edge 76 of the thickened portion 74 of latching springs 66. Referring to FIG. IV of the drawings, it should be noted that the distance between seat 122 and circulation passage 14 in body member 12 is equal to the distance between the tapered lower edge 76 on latching spring 66 and circulation port 46 in port sleeve 44. It should be readily appreciated that when tapered lower edge 76 of latching spring 66 engages seat 122 on body member 12 circulation ports 46 and 14 coincide.

lt should be readily appreciated that port sleeve 44 is suspended in the intermediate position, illustrated in FIG. IV, by latching springs 66. Cam surface 106 on the lower end of locking sleeve 7S urges the tapered lower surface of thickened portion 76 of latching springs 66 into engagement with seat 122 on body member 12. No downward force is exerted on locking sleeve 7S by latching springs 66. Therefore, shear screws 90 which detachably secure locking sleeve 78 in the upper position cannot be sheared until bore d6 through locking sleeve bale 84 is closed.

DESCRIPTION OF A SECOND EMBODIMENT Referring to FIGS. X and XI of the drawings, it should be noted that latching springs 66a may be connected at the lower ends by a ring 67a to form a latching spring assembly 66', allowing a plurality of latching springs 66a to be manufactured and installed as a unit.

Latching springs 66a are identical to latching springs 66 hereinbefore described except for the use of connector rings 67d.

OPERATION The operation and function of the stage cementing device hereinbefore described is as follows:

Referring to FIG. I, `well casing tube 2 having the stage cementing device 4 positioned in the desired location therein is positioned in well bore 1. Valve a on the lower wing of the manifold of cement head v10 is opened, allowing mud to circulate downwardly through casing 2 and back up around the outside thereof. When the mud is conditioned a trip ball 8b is released from dropper 10b and is pumped into position in float shoe 8a. After the trip ball 8b is dropped circulation is continued until the trip ball seats to pressure eject float shoe 8a, leaving casing 2 unrestricted for volume ow and reducing normal circulating pressure.

Valve 10a is then closed and the center valve 10c is opened as lower plug 8d is dropped. Cement is then pumped through valve 10c, forcing bottom plug `Sb downwardly until a predetermined amount of cement has been pumped into tubing 2. Valve 10c is then closed and top plug 6r is dropped. Upper valve 10d is opened, allowing mud to force the top plug 6r and the cement therebeneath downwardly until top plug 6r seats in stall collar 6, completing the lower cement job.

It should be noted that stage cementer 4 remains in the running configuration with circulating ports 14 in tbody 12 closed while the lower cementing job is being carried out.

Trip ball Sb, bottom plug 8d and top plug 6i pass through bore 86 in locking sleeve battle 84 and bore 60` in port sleeve baffle 58.

When the lower cementing job is completed, trip bomb 130 is dropped through casing 2 and is allowed to gravitate downwardly therethrough to seal bore 60 in locking sleeve baille 58.

With the port sleeve 44 being held in the up position by shear pins 56 and locking sleeve 78 being secured in the up position by shear pins 90 and with the bomb 130 arrested in port sleeve baffle 58, stage cementing device 4 is ready to be staged.

When pressure is applied urging bomb 130 and port sleeve 44 downwardly, shear pins 56 are sheared and port sleeve 44 is moved downwardly until it is arrested when the tapered lower edges 76 of latching springs 66 engage seat 122 in the bore 32 of body member 12. With latching springs 66 against the seat1122 circulation ports 46 and 14 are axially aligned to permit circulating fluids out of the casing and into the hole 1. Seals 50 and 52 prevent the circulating fluids from entering the clearance between the inner edge of body 12 and the outer edge of port sleeve 44.

It should be noted that latching springs 66 cannot spring inwardly as long as locking sleeve 78 is in the up position, see FIG. lV. Ports 46 in port sleeve 44 and ports 14 in body 12 are aligned vertically when the staging tool 4 is assembled. Rotation of port sleeve 44 during the downward staging operation is prevented by the aligning pins 108 extending through the locking sleeve 78 into slots 110 between latching springs 66.

After the cementing operation is completed and it is desired to close circulation ports 14, a wiper plug assembly 135 is pumped through casing 2 until it is arrested by locking sleeve ba'le 84 closing the bore `86 therethrough. Pressure applied downwardly on Vbaille 84 by wiper plug assembly 135 will shear the shear pins 9i), allowing locking sleeve 78 to be moved downwardly. Locking sleeve 78 will continue to move downwardly until the lower surface of the locking sleeve contacts the upper surface of port sleeve 44. The anti-rotation lugs 112 then engage slots 64.

With the locking sleeve 7 8 in this intermediate position latching springs 66 spring inwardly into reduced area 104 on locking sleeve 78, allowing the thickened portion '74 of the latching spring to move downwardly to pass seat i122. Locking sleeve 78 and port sleeve 44 move downwardly together until the lower end of port sleeve 44 engages the upper surface of lower body member 34.

As port sleeve 44 moves downwardly seals 48 and 50 seal off passages 14 in the body 12 and as the port sleeve 44 and locking sleeve 78 reach the lower limits of travel lower spring lock 102 and upper spring lock 100 snap into locking groove 116 to engage surface 120.

If port sleeve 44 and locking sleeve 78 rotate relative to lower body member 34 as they move downwardly, causing lugs 62 on the lower end of port sleeve 44 to move out of alignment with slots 42 in the upper end of lower body member 34, lower spring lock 102 will seat under surface 120 in locking groove 116. If the locking sleeve '78 and port sleeve 44 are so rotated, the nal locking operation is not completed until drill out is begun at which time locking sleeve 78 and port sleeve 44 will rotate until lugs 62 move into engagement with slots 42, allowing upper spring lock 100 to move downwardly to seat under surface 120. When the upper spring lock is seated under surface 120 in locking groove 116, antirotation lugs 112 engage slots 64 and lugs 62 engage slots 42, preventing rotation of locking sleeves 78 and port sleeve 44 relative to body 12 of stage cementing device 4. It should be noted that battles 58 and 84 are constructed of an aluminum or other drillable material.

Oil eld equipment is often stored for long periods of time, sometimes under adverse conditions such as extreme heat, until they are needed. Stage cementing devices heretofore developed could not be eld tested prior to use to determine whether or not the tool had become unserviceable after being stored.

To iield test stage cementing device `4, shear screws 56 may be removed, allowing port sleeve 44 to move downwardly to the position illustrated in FIG. 1V. Pressure may then be applied to test serviceability of the device. When testing and inspection has been completed port sleeve `44 may be moved upwardly, allowing shear screws 56 to be reinserted. The stage cementing device may then be positioned in the casing string to be lowered in the well.

From the foregoing it should be readily apparent that I have developed a stage cementing device which may be manufactured inexpensively because numerous costly manufacturing processes, which have heretofore been required, are not necessary. The cementing device may be assembled quickly and easily and may be field tested to determine whether or not it is serviceable.

A single integral port sleeve 44 is utilized for opening and closing passages 14 through the body of stage cementing device to eliminate pressure locking which has been a major difficulty heretofore encountered.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. In a stage cementing device, a tubular body having passages extending through the wall thereof; a tubular port sleeve slideably disposed in the body, said sleeve having ports extending through the wall thereof; rst frangible means for securing the port sleeve to the body, said means being positioned to maintain the ports above the passages until the frangible means is broken; co-engageable shoulder means on the port sleeve and the body positioned to position and maintain the passages and the ports in aligned vertical relationship when the rst frangible means is broken and the port sleeve is moved downwardly; a lower bat'lle extending across the port sleeve below the passages having a central bore therethrough, a tubular locking sleeve slideably disposed in the body above the port sleeve; second frangible means for securing the locking sleeve to the body; slideably related interengaging means between the port sleeve and the locking sleeve to prevent rotation of the port sleeve relative to the locking sleeve to thereby circumferentially align the passages and ports; means on the locking sleeve for urging the shoulder means on the port sleeve into engagement with the shoulder means on the body until the second frangible means is broken and the locking sleeve is moved downwardly into engagement with the port sleeve; a baiile in the locking sleeve having a central bore therethrough; a stop in the body positioned to engage and limit the downward movement of the body sleeve to position and maintain the ports below the passages; latch means between the locking sleeve and the body to prevent upward movement of the locking sleeve and port sleeve; and seal rings between the port sleeve and the body to prevent leakage therebetween and between the ports and passages.

2. The combination called for in claim 1 wherein the first frangible means securing the port sleeve to the body is a shear screw positioned in aligned threaded holes within the body and the port sleeve.

3. The combination called for in claim 1 wherein the interengaging means between the port sleeve and the locking sleeve comprises spaced latching springs extending upwardly from the port sleeve; and means on the locking sleeve slideable between at least two of the latching springs to position the passages and the ports in circumferential alignment when the port sleeve moves downwardly.

4. The combination called for in claim 3 wherein the shoulder means to position and maintain the passages and the ports in aligned vertical relationship comprises an interior shoulder in the body above the passages; an exterior shoulder on the end of each latching spring engageable with the interior shoulder, said shoulders being on the latching springs above the ports a distance substantially equal to the distance between the interior shoulder and the passages; and the means on the locking sleeve for urging the shoulder means into engagement comprises a cam surface on the lower end of the locking sleeve for engaging and urging the exterior shoulder on each locking spring outwardly against the interior shoulder when the port sleeve is moved downwardly, and an annular recessed area about the locking sleeve above the cam surface to receive the locking springs to allow them to move inwardly out of engagement with the interior shoulder when the frangible means securing the locking sleeve to the body is broken and the locking sleeve is moved downwardly.

5. The combination called for in claim 4 wherein the latching means between the locking sleeve and the body comprises, an annular groove in the body and a contractible snap ring on the locking sleeve arranged to expand into the groove when the port sleeve is moved downwardly to contact the stop.

6. The combination called for in claim 3 with the addition of anti-rotation lugs on the locking sleeve and the port sleeve and slots on the port sleeve and the stop to receive the lugs; and wherein the latching means comprises, an annular groove in the body; an upper contractible snap ring and a lower contractible snap ring about the locking sleeve, whereby the lower snap ring expands and engages in the groove if the lugs on the port sleeve contact the upper surface of the stop and the upper snap ring also expends and engages in the groove when the lugs on the port sleeve enter the slots on the stop.

7. The combination called for in claim 1 wherein the second frangible means securing the locking sleeve to the body comprises a shear screw positioned in aligned holes in the body and the locking sleeve.

8. In a stage cementing device, a tubular body having at least one circulating passage through the wall thereof; a tubular port sleeve slideably disposed in the body having at least one circulation port through the wall thereof; a central restriction in the port sleeve below the port; a iirst shear screw joining the port sleeve and the body positioned to maintain the port in the port sleeve in a position out of alignment with the passage in the body; coacting means on the port sleeve and the body to limit downward movement of the port sleeve when the first shear screw is broken, positioned to align the ports and passages vertically when the coacting means are engaged; a locking sleeve slidably disposed in the body; slidably related interengaging means between the port sleeve and the locking sleeve to limit relative rotational motion therebetween; a central restriction in the locking sleeve; guide means on the locking sleeve to cause the coacting means on the port sleeve to move into engagement with the coacting means on the body when the port sleeve moves downwardly; a second shear screw joining the locking sleeve and the body; a stop in the body to limit downward movement of the port sleeve with the circulation port in the port sleeve below the circulation passage in the body member; and locking means between the locking sleeve and the body to prevent upward movement of the port sleeve after it contacts the stop.

9. In a stage cementing device, adapted to be secured in a casing string, a tubular body having at least one passage through the wall thereof; a port sleeve having at least one port through the wall thereof slideably disposed in the body; rst frangible means initially securing the port sleeve to the -body with the ports above the passages; a locking sleeve slideably disposed in the body; second frangible means initially securing the locking sleeve in the body; the locking sleeve and port sleeve being so initially positioned in the body that the passage and port are out of alignment; slideably related interengaging means on the sleeves to limit relative rotation of the sleeves to thereby circumferentially align the passage and port; coengageable shoulder means between the body and the port sleeve to limit longitudinal movement of the port sleeve relative to the body to vertically align the passage and port; means on the locking sleeve to move and maintain the shoulder means into engagement as the port sleeve moves longitudinally with reference to the body; a first annular seat in the bore of the port sleeve below the ports; a first closure member movable by hydraulic pressure through the casing and seatable on the tirst annular seat to break by hydraulic force the vfirst frangible means and move the port sleeve downwardly; a second annular seat in the bore of the locking sleeve; a second closure member movable through the casing by hydraulic pressure and seatable on the second annular seat to break the second frangible means by hydraulic force to move the locking sleeve downwardly into engagement with the port sleeve to thereby move the port sleeve downwardly and move the port and passage out of alignment; and stop means in the body engageable with the port sleeve to limit downward movement thereof.

10. The combination called for in claim 9 with the addition of anti-rotation lugs on the lower edge of the locking sleeve and the port sleeve and slots in the upper edge of the port sleeve and the stop means whereby the anti-rotation lugs on the locking sleeve engage the slots in the port sleeve and the anti-rotation lugs on the port sleeve engage the slots in the stop means as the locking sleeve and port sleeve move downardly.

11. The combination called for in claim 10 with the addition of expandable and contractible latching means about the looking sleeve and an annular groove in the body arranged to receive the latching means to prevent upward movement of the locking sleeve and the port sleeve when the port sleeve engages the stop means.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,659,438 11/1953 Schnitter 166-154 3,228,473 1/1966 Baker 166-154 3,306,365 2/1967 Kammerer 166--154 3,338,311 8/1967 Conrad 166-154 JAMES A. LEPPINK, Primary Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R. 166-224

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Classifications
U.S. Classification166/154, 166/318
International ClassificationE21B34/14, E21B34/00, E21B33/14, E21B33/16, E21B33/13
Cooperative ClassificationE21B33/146, E21B34/14, E21B33/16
European ClassificationE21B33/16, E21B34/14, E21B33/14C