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Publication numberUS3528203 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 15, 1970
Filing dateMay 2, 1968
Priority dateMay 2, 1968
Publication numberUS 3528203 A, US 3528203A, US-A-3528203, US3528203 A, US3528203A
InventorsFranklin Robert C, Lane Richard O
Original AssigneeBendix Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Grinding wheel
US 3528203 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. l5, 1970 R, C, FRANKLJN ETAL 3,528,203

GRINDING WHEEL Filed May 2, 1968 INVENTORS GMX/m.,

`United States Patent O 3,528,203 GRINDING WHEEL Robert C. Franklin and Richard O. Lane, Jackson, I VIich., assignors to The Bendix Corporation, a corporation of Delaware Filed May 2, 1968, Ser. No. 725,997

Int. Cl. B24b 41 /00 U.S. Cl. 51-168 5 Claims ABSTRACT 0F THE DISCLOSURE A grinding wheel mountable on an arbor by engagement with a pair of flanges and deformable blotters having radially oriented ridges in its lateral surfaces at the flange portion.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the invention Grinding wheels and more particularly grinding wheels constructed of abrasive grains for mounting on an arbor.

Description of the prior art It is well known in the art that slippage between a grinding wheel and the arbor on which it is mounted may precipitate breakage of the wheel. It will be appreciated that a wheel breaking while rotating at high speed can eject sizable sections of abrasive material at velocities which can cause extensive injury to nearby persons.

In the past, abrasive grain size irregularities in the lateral surfaces of grinding wheels have provided a convenient means for preventing relative rotation of the wheel with respect to an arbor. More particularly, blotters which are deformable to conform to the irregularities are used in combination with rigid flanges to mount the wheel to an arbor. The blotters are placed adjacent the lateral sides of the grinding wheel and are pressed into its sides to conform to the irregularities by a compressive force applied by a pair of flanges. Slippage between the wheel and the blotters is prevented by a meshing effect between the deformable blotters and the irregularities of the grinding wheel. In turn, slippage between the blotters and the flanges is prevented by frictional engagement between the two. The pressure distribution across the face of the flange is uniform since the irregularities are small and therefore any possible variance of the pressure distribution due to these irregularities is effectively cancelled by the deformable blotter. As a result of this uniform pressure distribution, a highly efficient frictional engagement between the blotter and the flange results.

Recent developments in grinding wheel molding techniques have resulted in wheels with smooth lateral surfaces. The new bonding techniques are used to add strength to compensate for increases in operating speed, load and temperature. When these new wheels are used in combination with blotters and flanges, slippage occurs between the blotter and the wheel due to a lack of meshing engagement heretofore provided by the grain-size irregularities. This problem is compounded by the increased operating speeds and loads. It has previously been dealt with by roughening the sides of the wheel by rolling heavily-loaded hardened spheres over the surface to disintegrate the outermost layer of the lateral sides of the grinding wheel and thereby expose a layer having grainsize irregularities. This operation has proven to be prohibitively costly.

Under the present state-of-the-art, it is not possible to mold grain-size irregularities into the lateral surfaces of the wheel. Rather, any projection or molded feature must have a dimension being substantially more than a single grain size. Therefore, the naturally occurring irregular- Mice ities could not be readily substituted for by molded-in irregularities of the same dimensions. The use of irregularities of substantially greater dimension than grain size was thought to be unfeasible because the greater dimension has a pressure effect that is transmittabl through the blotter thereby creating a uniform pressure distribution across the face of the flange. It has been believed that the nonuniform pressure distribution would prevent efficient frictional engagement between the flange and blotter. Accordingly, it was considered necessary to provide flanges having corresponding patterns of irregularities machined into their faces to provide even pressure distribution and acceptable non-slipping engagement between the grinding wheels and flanges. Machined flanges, however, are relatively costly and frequently become unserviceable due to wear caused by the abrasive environment to `which they are subjected.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention provides a grinding wheel for use with flanges having smooth faces having a molded pattern in its lateral sides which effectively prevents motion between the wheel and an arbor on which it is mounted. The grinding wheel according to this invention has a plurality of radially oriented ridges in its lateral surfaces in the area of flange engagement which are substantially greater in peak-to-valley height than the size of average abrasive grains of the wheel. The radially oriented ridges provide both an effective frictional engagement between the blotter and the flange and a strong intermeshing effect between the ridges and the deformable blotter. The uneven pressure distribution on the face of the flange has no adverse effect in the case of radially oriented ridges. Advantageously, the cost of producing the wheel is not significantly increased by the addition of the molded pattern nor is its strength reduced.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective, exploded view of a grinding wheel assembly according to this invention.

FIG. 2 is a perspective, exploded view of another wheel assembly according to this invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS In FIG. 1, a grinding wheel 10 constructed of abrasive grains having a hole 12, periphery 14 and lateral surfaces 16 is shown. Although FIG. 1 is shown as an eX- ploded view to facilitate the teaching of the present invention, the structures shown therein will be described with respect to their operating positions. The lateral surfaces 16 are provided with a plurality of ridges 18 eX- tending radially from the grinding wheel axis 20 in the portions 22 which correspond to the engagement of the vblotters 24 and the flanges 26. Since presently available blotters and flanges are circular in shape, it is preferred that the ridges are defined by inner and outer circles approximately corresponding to the mating part of the flanges 26. The flanges 26 are mounted on an arbor 28 in a manner such that flange bosses 30 hold the Wheel 10 in coaxial relationship with respect to the arbor 28. A compressive force is placed on the flanges 26 -by a clamping nut 32 threaded onto the arbor 28 which force is transmitted to the wheel 10 through the blotters 24. As can be seen in the drawings, the flanges 26 are provided with flat faces 34 which are in frictional engagement with the deformable blotters 24 which are in turn in meshing engagement with the ridges 18 of the Wheel 10. The ridges 18 shown in this view are impressed into the lateral surfaces 16 of the wheel 10 such that the peaks of the ridges are flush with the lateral surfaces 16. This construction is preferred since it permits stacking of the molded Wheels before they are hardened in the bonding process without deformation of the ridges 18. The peak-to-valley height of the ridges 18 is substantially greater than the average abrasive grain size of the Wheel 10. As such, the ridges may be conveniently provided by state-of-the-art molding techniques. In particular, the ridges 118 have been suitably provided by placing an adaptor ring having the ridges formed thereon in a conventional grinding wheel mold.

In FIG. 2, another grinding wheel 110 according to this invention is illustrated. The wheel 110 has a hole 112 for direct mounting of the wheel on the arbor 128 and a concentric periphery 114. In this embodiment, the lateral sides 116 of the wheel 110 are provided with a plurality of radially oriented ridges 118 which are elevated above the surface of the lateral sides 116. A pair of deformable blotters 124 are provided to intermesh with the ridges 118 on their one side and to frictionally engage a pair of flanges 126 on their other side. The flanges 126 are of a common disc shape which are particularly suited for mating with a grinding Wheel having elevated ridges 118. Flanges of this construction may also be used with ridges which are recessed as shown in FIG. 1. As in the previous case, the flange faces 134 are flat. A nut 132 is threadable on arbor 128 to provide a compressive force which is transmitted through flanges 126 and blotters 124 to the wheel 110.

In practice, the ridges have proved to effectively prevent slippage between grinding lwheels and arbors when used in combination with conventional at-faced anges. It is therefore believed to be a significant advancement in the art.

Although this invention has been disclosed and illustrated with reference to a particular application, the principles involved are susceptable to numerous other applications which will be apparent to persons skilled in the art. The invention is, therefore, to be limited only as indicated by the scope of the appended claims.

Having thus described our invention, we claim:

1. A grinding wheel constructed of abrasive grains of the type which is mountable on an arbor by a pair of blotters disposed adjacent corresponding portions of opposite lateral surfaces of said wheel and a pair of anges disposed adjacent said blotters which apply a compressive force to said wheel portions through said blotters, said wheel having a plurality of radially oriented molded ridges at said Wheel portions which are substantially greater in peak-to-valley height than the average size of said grains.

2. The grinding Wheel of claim 1 wherein said ridges are entirely above the lateral surface of the wheel.

3. The grinding Wheel of claim 1 wherein the peaks of said ridges are flush with the lateral surface of the Wheel.

4. A grinding -wheel assembly comprising:

a grinding wheel constructed of abrasive grains having a central hole therethrough for passage of an arbor upon which the wheel is mounted and a plurality of radially oriented molded ridges at predetermined portions in the lateral surfaces thereof being substantially greater in peak-to-valley height than the average size of said grains,

a pair of deformable blotters disposed adjacent said wheel portions, and

ange means disposed adjacent said blotters for applying a compressive force to said wheel portions through said blotters.

5. The grinding wheel of claim 4 wherein said ridges are entirely above the lateral surface of the wheel.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,785,515 3/1957 Sansig 51-168 1,944,489 1/1934 Bockshe 51-168 489,149 l/1893 Hyde 51--168 FOREIGN PATENTS .669,003 12/ 1938 Germany.

40 JAMES L. JONES, J R., Primary Examiner

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US489149 *Jan 3, 1893 Construction of emery-wheels and supports therefor
US1944489 *Jul 22, 1932Jan 23, 1934Ely BocksheGrinder
US2785515 *Mar 14, 1956Mar 19, 1957Simonds Abrasive CompanyGrinding wheel and means for mounting and driving the same
DE669003C *Aug 29, 1936Dec 14, 1938Hans PamlerSpannflansch zum Verhindern des Abfliegens von Teilen gesprungener Schleifscheiben
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4794737 *Mar 6, 1987Jan 3, 1989Black & Decker Inc.Universal backing flange
US4976071 *Nov 28, 1987Dec 11, 1990Robert Bosch GmbhClamping fixture for axially clamping a tool in place, in particular a disc
US5207028 *Feb 6, 1992May 4, 1993Black & Decker Inc.Tool element subassembly and method of manufacturing same
US5287659 *Nov 18, 1992Feb 22, 1994Black & Decker Inc.Tool element subassembly and method of manufacturing same
US5339571 *Oct 29, 1993Aug 23, 1994Black & Decker Inc.Tool element subassembly
US5655958 *Sep 20, 1994Aug 12, 1997Lupi; QuintilioElastic base grinding wheel for smoothing and polishing toroidal contours of hard materials
US6749496Mar 20, 2003Jun 15, 2004Saint-Gobain Abrasives, Inc.Reinforced abrasive wheels
US6942561Apr 1, 2004Sep 13, 2005Saint-Gobain Abrasives Technology CompanyReinforced abrasive wheels
US7115029 *Jan 23, 2003Oct 3, 2006Tyrolit Schleifmittelwerke Swarovski Kg.Abrasive cutting disk with lateral steel sheets
DE102008015955A1 *Mar 20, 2008Aug 13, 2009Metabowerke GmbhHand tool device, has brakeable drive spindle with tool flange for rotatably driven tool, and deforming unit arranged on side of tool, where side is turned away from tool flange and deforming unit is designed as component of clamping nut
EP0596831A1 *Oct 21, 1993May 11, 1994HILTI AktiengesellschaftDisc-like tool for angle grinder
Classifications
U.S. Classification451/342
International ClassificationB24D5/00, B24D5/16
Cooperative ClassificationB24D5/16
European ClassificationB24D5/16
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 20, 1982AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: BENDIX CORPORATION, THE, A CORP. OF DE.
Effective date: 19820806
Owner name: DRESSER INDUSTRIES, INC., THE DRESSER BLDG. 1505 E
Aug 20, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: DRESSER INDUSTRIES, INC., THE DRESSER BLDG. 1505 E
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:BENDIX CORPORATION, THE, A CORP. OF DE.;REEL/FRAME:004026/0144
Effective date: 19820806