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Publication numberUS3528426 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 15, 1970
Filing dateJan 9, 1968
Priority dateJan 10, 1967
Also published asDE1303719B, DE1303719C2
Publication numberUS 3528426 A, US 3528426A, US-A-3528426, US3528426 A, US3528426A
InventorsVukojevic Radivoje
Original AssigneeVukojevic Radivoje
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adhesive band for replacing cutaneous stitching
US 3528426 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Radivoje Vukojevic I v Bulevar Revolucije 287, Belgrade, Yugoslavia [21] Appl. No. 696,540

United States Patent 72 Inventor Battersby [22] Filed Jan. 9 9 5/1887 Penny.......... 5 Patented Sept. 15 970 679,993 8/1901 ROSS 6t 3].. [32] Priority Jan. 10 19 7 2,018,517 10/1935 Fetter.......... [3 3] Yugosavia 2,3 87 ,131 10/ 1945 Fernandez [31] 2,421,193 5/1947 Gardner FOREIGN PATENTS 928,389 6/1947 Franceum................ 8/1951 France...,................. 9/1933 Germany..................

a rolled dressing being secured to one of the longitudinal portions.

608,605 Primary Examiner-Dalton L. Truluck Attorney-Waters, Roditi, Schwartz and Nissen ABSTRACT: An adhesive band has two longitudinal portions which are connected to each other by transverse elastic members of semi-circular cross-section. The elastic members are secured to the longitudinal portions with their convex surfaces in contact therewith,

[54] ADHESIVE BAND FOR REPLACING CUTANEOUS STITCI-IING 8 Claims, 6 Drawing Figs.

51 [50] Field Patented Sept. 15, 1970 Fla a ADHESIVE BAND FOR REPLACING CUTANEOUS STITCI-IING BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to an adhesive band.

The band, according to the invention, offers the possibility of bringing closely together, without the use of needles, sutures or metal clips, the edges of a wound resulting from injury or surgery, this effect being obtained by the connections of the 1 band which hold together the two parts of the band.

More particularly, the band according to the invention comprises a pair of longitudinal portions, each adapted for being applied to the skin on a respective side of a wound, and elastic connections secured to the longitudinal portions to hold the edges of the wound in juxtaposition when the longitudinal portions are connected to the skin on the opposite sides of the wound. Additionally, a dressing can be attached to one of the portions for covering the wound if this is desired.

The advantage of the band according to the invention over conventional stitching consists in the painless and speedy use of the band without the need for needles, sutures or metal clips thereby avoiding scars caused by the stitches or clips. Moreover, the band according to the invention avoids the need to remove stitches or clips.

The whole process of closing a wound comprises the simple affixing of the band by its adherence to the skin following cleaning of the wound in accordance with surgical practice. A subsequent dressing or bandage is unnecessary and the band can be removed after a suitable time or it can be left in place until it automatically separates itself from the wound. By the use of this band, there is no need to use a plurality of sterile instruments, such as instrument sets, needles, needle holders, sutures, etc., for each injury. It also avoids the use of rolled bandages for additional dressing.

The positioning and securing of the band takes very little time so that a larger number of surgical procedures can be carried out in a given time span which is of obvious advantage in multiple or group accidents or catastrophies, and in military operations. The band can be used as a first dressing if the dimensions of the constituent parts are enlarged under condition of first using the customary swab or tampon in the wound. The use of this band saves not only time, but also dressing material.

In comparison with the conventional stitching, the biological value of the band is that the corresponding layers of the skin structure are brought into correct apposition as a consequence of which the residual scar is of minimal size in contrast to the conventional stitching wherein the underlying layers of the skin are brought to the surface thereby producing a larger scar.

Additionally, when performing a conventional closure, as a consequence of drawing the edges together, the deeper vessels are closed off thereby inhibiting or preventing normal circulation and trophic supply to the damaged tissue which by its very presence in the surface tissues acts as a foreign body.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1A is a perspective view of a portion of the band according to the invention from the outer surface thereof;

FIG. 1B is a perspective view similar to FIG. 1A of a modified version of the band;

FIG. 2A is a perspective view of the band of FIG. IA from the inner surface thereof;

FIG. 2B is a perspective view of the band of FIG. 18 from the inner surface thereof;

FIG. 3 shows the band packaged as a dressing in a sterile container; and

FIG. 4 shows the band as applied to a wound.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION The adhesive band illustrated in FIG. 1A consists of two longitudinal parts, In and lb, which are mutually connected by the use of transyerse elastic connections 2. These connections are of semi-circular cross-section, their convex surfaces 0 3 is secured to part lb which is somewhat wider than the part In accordance with the modification illustrated in FIG. 1B, the transverse elastic connections 2 are connected to each other by longitudinal elastic strips 20 extending parallel to the longitudinal edges of the parts la and lb of the adhesive band. The strips 2a are similarly of semi-circular cross-section with their convex surfaces secured to the longitudinal parts la and 1b.

The band is used in the following manner:

The longitudinal part lb is secured adhesively to the skin along one edge of the wound, the skin having been previously cleaned, particularly by removal of any oily or fatty substance. The part lb may be provided with an adhesive substance so that it can be directly secured to the skin. The other longitudinal part In is then securely held and stretched and applied, similarly, in stretched condition to the other edge of the wound. The two edges of the wound are brought together and held in juxtaposition and apposition by the elastic transverse connections 2. The rolled dressing 3 is then laid on top of the band and secured to the skin around the periphery of the complete dressing by applying adhesive strips 4 around the edges as indicated in FIG. 4.

The use of the dressing requires no particular skill, and can be applied quickly.

I claim:

l. A band comprising first and second longitudinal portions each adapted for being applied to the skin on a respective side of a wound, and elastic means transversely connecting the longitudinal portions such that with the portions connected to the skin on the opposite sides of a wound, the elastic means serves to hold the edges of the wound in juxtaposition, said elastic means comprising a plurality of spaced transverse elastic members, and a longitudinal elastic member on each said longitudinal portion, the transverse elastic members being connected to each of the longitudinal elastic members.

2. A band as claimed in claim 1, wherein each said transverse elastic member has a semi-circular cross-section with a convex surface in contact with said longitudinal portions.

3. A band as claimed in claim 1 comprising dressing means secured to one of said portions for covering the portions when the latter are connected to the skin on opposite sides of the wound.

4. A band as claimed in claim 3, wherein said dressing means is a rolled dressing.

5. A band as claimed in claim 1, wherein said elastic members have semi-circular cross-sections with convex surfaces in contact with said longitudinal portions.

6. A band as claimed in claim 5, wherein said longitudinal portions have adjacent edges and the longitudinal elastic members extend parallel to said edges of the longitudinal portions in proximity therewith.

7. A band as claimed in claim 6, wherein said transverse elastic members have opposite ends secured to the longitudinal elastic members.

8. A band as claimed in claim 1. comprising adhesive means on the longitudinal portions for applying such portions to the skin on the opposite sides of a wound.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4526166 *Aug 12, 1983Jul 2, 1985Silber Arthur LDisconnectible section bandage
US4825866 *Aug 27, 1987May 2, 1989Robert PierceWound closure device
US5259835 *Aug 29, 1991Nov 9, 1993Tri-Point Medical L.P.Wound closure means and method using flowable adhesive
US5445597 *Sep 30, 1993Aug 29, 1995Tri-Point Medical L.P.Wound closure means using flowable adhesive
US7683234Aug 3, 2007Mar 23, 2010The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversityDevices and bandages for the treatment or prevention of scars and/or keloids and methods and kits therefor
US7981136Dec 10, 2007Jul 19, 2011Weiser Leslie PWound closure device
US8063263Jan 22, 2009Nov 22, 2011The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversityMethods for the treatment or prevention of scars and/or keloids
US8168850Jan 22, 2009May 1, 2012The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversityMethods for the treatment or prevention of scars and/or keloids
US8183428Jan 22, 2009May 22, 2012The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversityTreatment or prevention of scars and/or keloids
US8366693Jun 18, 2010Feb 5, 2013Spiracur, Inc.Methods and devices for applying closed incision negative pressure wound therapy
US8389791Apr 18, 2011Mar 5, 2013The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversityTreatment devices and methods with extending elements
US8395011Dec 8, 2011Mar 12, 2013Neodyne Biosciences, Inc.Segmented skin treatment systems and methods
US8398604 *Sep 26, 2011Mar 19, 2013Spiracur, Inc.Methods and devices for applying closed incision negative pressure wound therapy
US8409159Apr 9, 2010Apr 2, 2013Spiracur, Inc.Methods and devices for applying closed incision negative pressure wound therapy
US8435221Jun 18, 2010May 7, 2013Spiracur, Inc.Closed incision negative pressure wound therapy device and methods of use
US8444614Sep 24, 2010May 21, 2013Spiracur, Inc.Methods and devices for applying closed incision negative pressure wound therapy
US8562576Jan 11, 2011Oct 22, 2013Spiracur, Inc.Closed incision negative pressure wound therapy device and methods of use
US8592640Aug 11, 2010Nov 26, 2013Neodyne Biosciences, Inc.Devices and methods for dressing applicators
US8674164Apr 18, 2011Mar 18, 2014Neodyne Bioscience, Inc.Segmented skin treatment systems and methods
US8764792Feb 21, 2008Jul 1, 2014Leslie Philipp WeiserMethod and apparatus for closing wounds without sutures
US8834434Oct 18, 2013Sep 16, 2014Spiracur Inc.Closed incision negative pressure wound therapy device and methods of use
US20120016321 *Sep 26, 2011Jan 19, 2012Kenneth WuMethods and devices for applying closed incision negative pressure wound therapy
EP0453413A1 *Mar 28, 1991Oct 23, 1991Giontella, MassimoDistention device for treating contractures of the paravertebral muscles
Classifications
U.S. Classification606/215, 602/58
International ClassificationA61B17/08, A61B17/03
Cooperative ClassificationA61B2017/086, A61B17/085
European ClassificationA61B17/08L