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Publication numberUS3528663 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 15, 1970
Filing dateAug 22, 1967
Priority dateAug 22, 1967
Publication numberUS 3528663 A, US 3528663A, US-A-3528663, US3528663 A, US3528663A
InventorsThaddeus B Curtz, John E Murray
Original AssigneeKms Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Market game
US 3528663 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

sep1.15,197o A T.B.URTZ ETAL 3,528,663

MARKET GAME Filed Aug. 22, 1967 3 Sheets-Sheet l I 1,1 ,Q I

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MARKET GAME 3 Sheets-Sheet S Filed Aug. 22, 1967 ATTORNEYS United States Patent O 3,528,663 MARKET GAME Thaddeus B. Curtz and .lohn E. Murray, Ann Arbor, Mich., assignors to KMS Industries, Inc., Ann Arbor, Mich., a corporation of Delaware Filed Aug. 22, 1967, Ser. No. 662,352 Int. Cl. A631? 3/00 U.S. Cl. 273-135 9 Claims ABSTRACT F THE DISCLOSURE A stock market game utilizing a board for two players, the board having indicia for the sequential placement of a plurality of plaques each carrying a segment of a graph of time-price uctuations of a stock. The plaques are placed sequentially on the board to develop a continuous price graph which may rise to a certain definitive line on the board or project down to a second definitive line or sudden-death area on the board. The selection of the plaques by the players is controlled by a die and the plaques contain indicia in addition to the graph segment which indicates rising or falling, and groups of numbers, some designated some designated and some designated Same Thus, the throw of the die determines what group of plaques can be used for the selection of the next plaque to be played.

BACKGROUND OF 'THE INVENTION This invention relates to educational and amusement devices and more particularly to a stock market game. In brief, this invention comprises an indicator grid and a plurality of plaques containing different segments of a graph of stock prices. The players place the plaques on the indicator grid on both their own and their opponents player stations in an attempt to make their own stock outperform their opponents stock.

Each plaque contains three essential characteristics which must be evaluated on every play. These characteristics are the trend of the price change of the graph segment, the amount of the price change, and a set of odds which predict how the price will move on the next play.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to educational and amusement devices and more particularly to a stock market or stock exchange game that can be played by two persons.

An object of this invention is to provide a means of teaching stock market chart analysis and market trading techniques.

Another object of this invention is to provide a means of readily teaching the terminology applied to various types or patterns of stock market price fluctuations.

Another object of this invention is to provide a game which is highly educational and amusing and provides the players with experiences similar to those encountered in stock exchange transactions.

Other objects and features of this invention will be apparent from the following description and claims in which there is found the manner of making and using the invention and the best mode contemplated by the inventors of carrying out this invention.

Drawings accompany this disclosure and the various views thereof may be briefly described as:

FIGS. l to 10, plan views of plaques having different kinds of stock price graph segments.

FIG. 11, a side edge view of a plaque.

FIG. l2, a plan view of an indicator grid with several plaques positioned thereon at both player stations.

Referring to the drawings:

In FIGS. 1 through 10, a plurality of plaques 20 each FPice having a diiferent portion or segment 22 of a graph of stock price uctuations with each segment beginning and terminating at a plaque alignment indicator 24 is shown. Each plaque 20 has an indicia 26 of the general trend of the graph segment 22. A (-1-) sign indicates that the net effect of the plaque 20 is to increase the price level of the stock and a sign indicates that the net effect of the plaque 20 is to lower the price level of the stock.

On each plaque 20 there is a plurality of numerals (designated generally as 28) categorized in groups. In the plaques 20 of FIGS. l, 2, 3 and 4 the plurality of numerals 28 is subdivided into three groups designated as a minus group 30, a plus group 32, and a same group 34. The numerals 28 in the plaques 20 of FIGS. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 are subdivided only into minus group 30 and a plus group 32. Each plaque 20 has terminology 36 which identities a particular pattern or coniiguraion of price fluctuations 22. In short, each plaque 20 and its terminology 36 represent a specific species of the genus of stock price fluctuations.

In FIG. l2, an indicator grid (designated generally as 38) having two player stations 40, 42 and two starting level indicators 44 is shown. The indicator grid 38 provides a relatively Hat surface area on which the plaques 20 can be placed. The grid 38 contains an achievement indicator 46, two sudden-death indicators 47, and a plurality of alignment guides 48 which are parallel to each other, perpendicular to the sudden-death indicators 47, and inclined with respect to the achievement indicator 46. In the preferred embodiment of the device the achievement indicator 46 is made wide enough to allow plaques 20 placed on both player stations 40, 42 to cross their respective edges of the achievement indicator 46 without interfering with each other. The precise width that is necessary to prevent such interference is determined by the size of the plaques 20 and the location of the alignment indicators 24 0n the plaques 20. While a plurality of alignment guides 48 is shown on the indicator grid 38, it is only necessary to provide one alignment guide 48 adjacent to each of the starting level indicators 44 because of the selfaligning feature of the structure of the plaques 20. This self-aligning feature will be described below.

A means of randomly selecting a single digit from the plurality of numerals 28 is provided. In the preferred embodiment of this device the plurality of numerals 28 is composed of the integers 1 through 6. Each player is provided with an individual die 50` as the preferred random selection means. However, a spinner, a pin wheel, a squirrel cage containing a plurality of numbered pieces, or a similar random selection apparatus may be utilized with this invention.

In the preferred embodiment -of this device there are twenty down trendline plaques 20, twenty up trendline plaques 20, ten support level plaques 20, ten resistance level plaques 20, ten down triangle plaques 20, ten up triangle plaques 20, four head and shoulders bottom plaques 20, four head and shoulders top plaques 20, four down ag plaques 20, and four up flag plaques 20. In the preferred embodiment of this device the plaques 20 are relatively thick (see FIG. 11) and have at least two edge surfaces 52 which are parallel to each other. The relatively thick parallel edge surfaces 52 facilitate the sliding engagement and the matching of adjacent alignment indicators of the plaques 20' when they are placed adjacent to or abutting one another on the indicator grid 38 as shown in FIG. 12. A relatively thick plaque also facilitates the handling and placement of the plaque 20 on the indicator grid 38. As is indicated above, this arrangement eliminates the necessity of providing more than two alignment guides 48 on the indicator grid 38 because the relatively thick edge surfaces 52 provide guiding or abutting surfaces for aligning the plaques with each other.

In the preferred embodiment of this device a player begins the game by selecting any one of the plaques 20 and placing it `on either of player stations 40, 42 of the indicator grid 38 so that the beginning alignment indicator 24 of the plaque 20 matches or is in line with the starting level indicator 44 and so that the edge surfaces 52 are adjacent to and parallel with the alignment guide 48. In subsequent plays the beginning alignment indicator 24 of a plaque 20 is aligned with the terminal alignment indicator 24 of the adjoining or abutting plaque 20. The player then rolls the die 50 or actuates another random selection means, thereby selecting a single digit of the plurality of numerals 28. The placement of a plaque 20 on the indicator grid 38 and the rolling of the die 50 represent one completed play or turn. As explained below, the selection of a single digit by the rolling of the die 50 restricts the group of plaques 20 from which the second player may make a selection of the next plaque to be played. In short, the die rolled by one player restricts the group from which the next plaque 20 to be played may be selected by the second player. Each plaque 20 can be considered to have an associated die 50v which determines the group from which the next plaque 20 to be played adjacent to it must be selected.

If the single digit selected by the random selection means 50 corresponds to one of the digits in the minus group of the plaque 20 with which it is associated, the

second player may select and play any plaque 20 which has a indicia 26. If the single digit selected by the random selection means 50 corresponds to one of the digits in the plus group 32 of the plaque 20 with which it is associated, the second player may select and play any plaque 20 which has a (-i-) indicia 26. If the single digit selected by the random selection means 50 corresponds to one of the digits in the same group 34 of the plaque 20 with which it is associated, the second player may select and play a plaque 20 which has exactly the same terminology 36. After the second player has selected a plaque 20 and properly placed it on the indicator grid 38, he then rolls the die 50 to select a single digit of the plurality of numerals 28, thereby completing his turn and determining the indicia 26, or in some instances the terminology 36, of the group from which the next plaque 20 to be played must be selected by the rst player. Whenever it is a players turn to select a plaque 20 and place it on the indicator grid 38, he can place it on either player station or 42.

The players continue alternately to place a plaque on the indicator grid 38 and roll a die 50 until the price graph 22 of one of the plaques 20 crosses an adjacent edge of the achievement indicator 46 and the terminal alignment indicator 24 of the plaque is located above that adjacent edge of the achievement indicator 46. If a sufficient number of plaques 20 have been placed on one of the player stations 40 or 42 so that no more plaques 20 can be placed on that station and none of the plaques 20 has crossed the achievement indicator 46, the player whose terminal alignment indicator 24, on the last plaque to be played on his player station 40 or 42, is the farther away from his sudden-death indicator 47 will be declared the winner. It is also possible to win the game by forcing an opponents price graph 22 and associated terminal alignment indicator 24 to dip below his sudden-death indicator 47. Hence, the three Ways to win the game are, to have a graph segment 22 and its associated terminal alignment indicator 24 cross the achievement indicator 46, to have a graph segment 22 and its associated terminal alignment indicator 24 cross the opponents sudden-death indicator 47, or to have the last graph segment 22 and its associated terminal alignment indicator 24 the farther away from its associated sudden-death indicator A47 upon the completion of all possible plays on either player station 40 or 42 of the indicator grid 38.

The essential characteristics of each plaque 20 are the trend of the price change as indicated by the (-1-) or indicia 26, the amount of the price change, and the set of odds determined by the plus, minus, and same groups 30, 32, 34 which dictate the plaques or the group of plaques from which one must be selected on the next play. Therefore, on each play a player must evaluate both the amount of gain or loss that will be incurred by playing a plaque 20 and the set of odds or probability of how the price will move on the next play.

At iirst blush it may seem that a player would always place a plaque 20 with a indicia 26 on his own player station 40 or 42 and a plaque 20 with a indicia 26 on the player station 40 or 42 of his opponent. However, this is not the best approach and in some instances is not even a permissable approach. For example, if it is a players turn to place a plaque 20 on the indicator grid 38 and his opponents stock has been moving up toward the achievement indicator 46 and the only plaque 20 available to be played is a plaque 20 with a indicia 26, inspection of a resistance level plaque 20 (as shown in FIG. 4) reveals that it has a indicia 26, and playing a resistance level plaque 20 will usually halt or slow down the upward movement of the opponents stock. Similarly, a head and shoulders top plaque (FIG. 7), while having a indicia, nevertheless has a 5-1 probability that an opponent would be required to use a minus plaque in the next play. Furthermore, these plaques do not move the price of the opponents stock very much closer to the achievement line 46 so it may very well be advantageous to play one of these plaques. Likewise, if a 'players stock has been moving down toward the sudden-death indicator 47 and only a plaque 20 with a indicia can be placed on the indicator grid 38, the player can select a head and shoulders bottom plaque 20 (as shown in FIG. 8) which does not move the players stock down very much and, according to the mixture of the minus and plus groups 30, 32 of this plaque, must five out of six times be followed by a plaque 20 with a indicia 26. Note also the high minus group in the plaque of FIG. 7. Because of these very strong plus or minus features of head and shoulders plaques 20 (as shown in FIGS. 7 and 8) and similar features of the ag plaques 20 (as shown in FIGS. 9 and 10), these plaques 20 are rationed in the preferred embodiment of this device. In the preferred embodiment each player is entitled to two head and shoulders top plaques 20 (as shown in FIG. 7), two head and shoulders bottom plaques 20 (as shown in FIG. 8), two up flag plaques 20 (as shown in FIG. 10), and two down flag plaques 20 (as shown in FIG. 9) during the course of a single game.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. A market game apparatus for two players which comprises:

(a) an indicator grid member having a relatively at surface with opposed parallel areas adjacent opposed Side edges to serve as bottom areas for respective players, and provided with line markings constituting two starting level indicators adjacent two other opposed side edges and spaced upwardly from respective bottom areas, side alignment guides adjacent and parallel to the last mentioned side edges, and an achievement indicator line disposed between the starting level indicators, extending between the last mentioned side edges, and disposed at an angle to the alignment guides,

(b) a plurality of groups of plaques for use on the grid, each plaque having indicia on a face surface depicting a segment of a graph and said plaque also bearing two or more groups of numerals, all the plaques in each group having lines generally parallel to the axis of said segment and positioned at the beginning and end of said segment to depict an upward or downward change in graph level and a symbol on each plaque indicating also the corresponding direction of change, the numerals on each plaque being the same but differently grouped, and

(c) a means operable by a player to achieve a random selection of an individual numeral from the groups of numerals.

2. A market game apparatus for two players as dened in claim 1 in which the opposed bottom areas delineated by spacing the bottom ends of the alignment guides from the adjacent edges of the grid member serve as two sudden-,death indicators, one for each player, and a plurality of alignment guides spaced between the last mentioned side edges parallel to and interposed between the side alignment guides adjacent to the edges.

3. A market game apparatus for two players as deiined in claim 1 in which each plaque is relatively thick at substantially parallel edge surfaces to facilitate the abutting and alignment of the plaques when placed on the indicator grid.

4. A market game apparatus for two players as defined in claim 1 in which the plaques have at least two parallel edge surfaces positioned for engagement with adjoining plaques to facilitate abutment and alignment of the plaques on the indicator grid.

5. A market game apparatus for two players as dened in claim 1 in which the indicator grid markings terminate at a distance from the first mentioned opposed edges to provide sudden-death indicator areas and in which the symbol on each plaque indicating a direction of change includes a plus or minus symbol corresponding to the direction of change of the graph segment.

6. A market game apparatus for two players as delined in claim 1 in which the indicator grid markings terminate at a distance from the rst mentioned opposed edges to provide sudden-death indicator areas substantially perpendicular to the alignment guides and in which the plaques carry additional indicia in the form of printed terminology descriptive of the conguration of the graph segment.

7. A market game apparatus for two players as defined in claim 1 in which the plaques have at least two relatively thick substantially parallel edge surfaces and a face surface carrying said indicia.

8. A market game apparatus for two players as dened in claim 1 in which the indicator grid markings terminate at a distance from the rst mentioned opposed edges to provide sudden-death indicator areas and in which the plaques have at least two relatively thick substantially parallel edge surfaces and a face surface carrying said indicia and having additional indicia in the form of printed terminology depicting the configuration of the graph segment.

9. A game apparatus for two players which comprises:

(a) an indicator grid member having a relatively flat surface with opposed parallel areas adjacent opposed edges to serve as bottom areas for respective players and opposed side edges connecting said rst mentioned edges, said grid provided with a line marking constituting a starting level indicator adjacent each said opposed side edge and spaced upwardly from a respective bottom area, alignment guides adjacent said side edges, an achievement indicator extending between said side edges inclined with respect to the alignment guides, said grid markings terminating at a distance from said rst mentioned edges to provide two sudden-,death indicator areas substantially perpendicular to the alignment guides, and a plurality of alignment guides spaced across the grid which are parallel to and interposed between the alignment guides adjacent to the edges,

(b) a plurality of plaques for use on the grid, each plaque having at least two relatively thick substantially parallel edge surfaces to register with alignment guides, and a face surface having a line depicting a segment of a graph with beginning and terminal alignment indicators, two or more groups of printed numerals, symbols indicative of the trend of the graph segment, and word terminology depicting the conguration of the graph segment, and

(c) a means operable by a player to achieve a random selection of individual numerals from the groups.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 471,666 3/1892 Doty 273-130 2,320,832 6/ 1943 Schoenberg et al. 273-130 2,347,094 4/ 1944 Fernandez 273-130 2,726,087 12/1955 Dunham 273-130 3,075,771 1/ 1963 Dodge 273-130 3,254,894 6/ 1966 Kollmeyer et al. 273-135 DELBERT B. LOWE, Primary Examiner U.S. Cl. XJR.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US471666 *Dec 29, 1890Mar 29, 1892 Harry a
US2320832 *Jun 14, 1941Jun 1, 1943MaximonEducational game
US2347094 *Jun 30, 1943Apr 18, 1944Fernandez Philip CGame
US2726087 *Mar 16, 1953Dec 6, 1955Carl M DunhamGame board and pieces
US3075771 *Nov 24, 1959Jan 29, 1963William L DodgeBoard game apparatus
US3254894 *Mar 29, 1963Jun 7, 1966KollmeyerGame simulating operations of the stock market and the like
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3942800 *Apr 9, 1975Mar 9, 1976Dwight HolbrookArcheological game
US4535994 *Apr 21, 1983Aug 20, 1985Cowan William PBoard game apparatus
US4588192 *Sep 15, 1983May 13, 1986Pedro LabordeFinancial futures game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/278
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00063
European ClassificationA63F3/00A6
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 19, 1987AS06Security interest
Owner name: BANQUE INDOSUEZ (AGENT)
Owner name: LAKESIDE INDUSTRIES, INC.
Owner name: TOY FUNDING CORPORATION & BANQUE INDOSUEZ (AGENT)
Effective date: 19870610
Jun 19, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: BANQUE INDOSUEZ (AGENT)
Owner name: TOY FUNDING CORPORATION & BANQUE INDOSUEZ (AGENT)
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:LAKESIDE INDUSTRIES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004747/0429
Effective date: 19870610
Oct 9, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: CONNECTICUT NATIONAL BANK THE, AS AGENT, 777 MAIN
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:LAKESIDE INDUSTRIES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004618/0934
Effective date: 19860801
Owner name: LAKESIDE INDUSTRIES, INC., 999 SO. QUAKER LANE, WE
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:LEISURE DYNAMIC, INC. A CORP OF DE;REEL/FRAME:004613/0310
Effective date: 19860206
Oct 9, 1986AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: LAKESIDE INDUSTRIES, INC., 999 SO. QUAKER LANE, WE
Owner name: LEISURE DYNAMIC, INC. A CORP OF DE
Effective date: 19860206