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Publication numberUS3529450 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 22, 1970
Filing dateOct 7, 1968
Priority dateOct 7, 1968
Also published asDE1810362A1, DE1810362B2, DE1810362C3, DE1817911A1
Publication numberUS 3529450 A, US 3529450A, US-A-3529450, US3529450 A, US3529450A
InventorsPellerin Norvin L
Original AssigneePellerin Norvin L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cleaning machine
US 3529450 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 22, 1970 N. L. PELLERIN 3,529,450

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Pa Lem/v ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,529,450 CLEANING MACHINE Norvin L. Pellerin, 17 Warbler Drive, New Orleans, La. 70124 Filed Oct. 7, 1968, Ser. No. 765,438 Int. Cl. D06f 37/08, 37/10 US. Cl. 68143 26 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE An end-loading cleaning machine comprising a cylinder axially divided into two compartments and mounted to rotate about a horizontal axis within a housing. =Each compartment is provided with a door at at least one end and the housing is provided with corresponding doors. Each door subtends about one third of the circumference of the cylinder, and the doors are so arranged that each cylinder door at a given end can be aligned with either housing door, at that end, or a pair of cylinder doors at one end can be aligned with the corresponding pair of housing doors. Means are provided for ensuring exact alignment of the cylinder and housing doors in any of these positions.

DISCLOSURE OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to an end-loading washing machine, or washer-extractor, which is exceptionally easy to load and unload, and especially adapted to permit automated loading.

Such machines conventionally comprise an inner cylinder mounted to rotate about a horizontal axis in an outer housing. Because of the vibration problem presented when the load is unevenly distributed in the rotating cylinder, this cylinder is ordinarily divided axially into at least two compartments, which are individually loaded with equal weights of clothing, thus reducing the maximum possible imbalance.

In the case of such two-compartment washers, at least one end of the cylinder is ordinarily provided with two doors and the housing end is provided with one or two corresponding doors, which are opened with the partition dividing the compartments in a horizontal position. This arrangement permits the doors to be as large as possible, since each door in the cylinder may occupy nearly half of the end of the cylinder, and the housing doors are of corresponding size. It also permits the cylinder doors to swing outwardly about axes closely paralleling the partition so that when a door occupying the upper half of the housing is opened and the partition is horizontal, the cylinder door will form a loading platform covering the space between the cylinder and housing, so that no clothing will drop or be caught between the cylinder and housing as the machine is being loaded or unloaded.

Unfortunately, this also means that the clothing must be pushed or pulled over a rather large horizontal sur face into and out of relatively inaccessible corners in the compartments, and automated loading and unloading is impractical.

Attempts have been made to overcome this problem by devising side loading machines which are loaded through doors in the cylindrical walls of the cylinder and housing, but these are difficult to keep tightly closed because of the centrifugal force exerted on the door when the cylinder is being rotated.

I have accordingly devised a machine in which the cylinder is divided into two compartments, each provided with an end door subtending about one third of the periphery of the cylinder, and the housing is provided with two corresponding doors, each having one side adjacent the upper half of a vertical line bisecting the housing end.

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The housing doors are mounted to swing outwardly about vertical axes parallel to said bisecting line.

When the cylinder is being loaded, the partition is vertical, all doors are open, and the Clothing drops into each compartment after being pushed through the door, since there is then no horizontal partition to support it.

When the cylinder is being unloaded, the partition is brought into alignment with the lower edge of one housing door. That housing door, and the cylinder door registering therewith, are then opened, and since the partition is in a sloping position, the clothing in that compartment tends to slide down into a position facilitating its removal.

The doors are then closed and the cylinder rotated until the other compartment door registers with the other housing door, and the process repeated.

In order to faciiltate the exact registration of housing and cylinder doors, an electrical spotting system may be provided.

A preferred embodiment of the invention will now 'be described, with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is an elevational view showing one end of the housing of a two-compartment, horizontal-axis end-loading washing machine according to the invention;

FIG. 2 is an elevational view showing the correspond ing end of the rotatable cylinder which turns in the housing shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an oblique elevational view showing the machine with both housing doors and both cylinder doors open, i.e., in loading position.

FIG. 4 is an oblique elevational view showing one unloading position with one cylinder door and one housing door open;

FIG. 5 is a side elevational view of the machine, showing a loading chute associated therewith;

FIG. 6 is a vertical axial section taken through the cam and photocell assembly which generates the signals for the spotting circuit;

FIG. 7 is a diagram showing the angular positions occupied by the lamps and registering photocells;

FIG. 8 is a diagram showing the alignment of the cam and the housing doors with the cylinder doors in unload right position;

FIG. 9 is a circuit diagram showing the electrical circuits of the spotting system;

FIG. 10 is a schematic view showing the position of a door on the clean, or unloading side of a pass-through machine, when ready for unloading;

FIG. 11 is a schematic view showing the position of a door on the dirty or loading side of the same machine, positioned for loading;

FIG. 12 is a schematic view showing the angular positions of the photocells in said pass-through machine; and

FIG. 13 is a circuit diagram showing the essential novel elements of a control circuit for such a machine.

As seen in FIGS. 1 to 4 my machine comprises a housing 10 in which a perforate cylinder 11 is mounted to rotate about a horizonal axis 12. The cylinder is divided into two compartments 13 and 14 by a partition 15. These compartments are provided with sectional doors A and B, the sections A and B of which are mounted to swing about axes 16 and 17 parallel to and adjacent the partition 15. Sections A and B are mounted to swing about axes 18 and 19, and Sections A and B about axes 20 and 21, respectively. Sections A A B and B are locked closed by bolts 22 in a conventional manner, and sections A A B B slightly overlap sections A B to hold the latter sections in place.

The housing 10 is provided with doors C and D which swing about vertical hinges 24, 25 respectively, and may be locked in a conventional manner.

It will be seen that each door subtends a little less than one-third of the periphery of a circle registering with the periphery of the cylinderin this specific embodiment, 108.

Turning now to FIG. 3, it will be seen that, for loading purposes, the cylinder is brought to a position in which the partition 15 is vertical, and all doors are opened. The first clothing dropped on the shelf formed by the door sections A B and slid into the cylinder will fall into the lower part of each compartment so that more can easily be added. There is then no need to push the clothes back over a horizontal surface within the cylinder so that conventional chutes for automatic loading may be used, as shown at 26 in FIG. 5. Such chutes are mounted to swing about a horizontal axis toward and away from the machine so that they may be swung away during unloading.

Turning now to FIG. 4, it will be seen that, for unloading, the cylinder 11 is positioned with the partition 15 in alignment with the lower edge of one of the doors C, D in the housing. When, as shown in FIG. 4, the door B is aligned with the left hand door C, the cylinder is brought into that position by rotating it clockwise, so that the clothes are bunched in the lower part of the compartment 14, opposite the door. After removal of the clothing, the doors are closed and the cylinder rotated counterclockwise until the door A on the cylinder is brought into alignment with the door D on the housing. The partition 15 will then slope the other way, and the clothes will be bunched at the lower end of compartment 13 for easy removal.

It will be readily apparent that, in a machine of this type, in which the rotable cylinder or basket must be stopped exactly and at will in any one of three different positions, some automatic means for producing this result is highly desirable.

Less readily apparent is the fact that, in order to properly bunch the clothes at the particular end of the compartment which is to be unloaded which will be lowermust when that compartment is spotted for unloading, it is desirable to insure that the basket complete at least the greater part of a full revolution in a direction away from the end at which the clothing is to be bunched, before it is stopped.

My invention accordingly comprises, in combination with a machine having its doors positioned as hereinbefore described, a spotting system permitting the compartment doors to be automatically spotted in any of the three desired positions, while ensuring that, when spotted for unloading, the clothes in the compartment to be unloaded will be properly bunched at the lower end of that compartment.

Turning now to FIG. 8, it will be seen that representa tive apparatus for this purpose comprises a circular cam 31 mounted to rotate with the drive shaft 12 of the machine. A 108 sector is cut out of this cam, one of the resulting radial edges E being aligned with the diametral partition in the basket and extending downwardly and to the right when the edge E is vertical in the 12 oclock position. Obviously, the first edge E is the leading edge when the basket is rotating counterclockwise and the trailing edge when the basket is rotating clockwise. Conversely, edge E is the leading edge when the basket is rotating clockwise and the trailing edge when it is turning counterclockwise.

FIG. 7 shows the location of four photocells P1, P2, P3, P4 positioned about the periphery of a stationary disk 32 parallel to the cam. These photocells, when illuminated, close certain circuits which will be hereinafter described in detail. On the opposite side of the cam is a registering stationary disk 33 (FIG. 6) provided with 4 lamps, G1, G2, G3, G4, each lamp being aligned with one of said photocells, and positioned to illuminate that photocell whenever the lamp is lit and the cam is so positioned that its open sector is between the lamp and photocell.

A shield 34 is positioned between the lamps and the cam and provided with narrow radial slots registering with the lamps so as to narrowly limit the beam directed toward each photocell, and insure accurate spotting.

It will be appreciated that many conventional commercial washer-extractors are provided with several motors, and the controls necessary to permit said motors to drive the basket in either direction at least two different speeds, and to start and stop the basket. The circuitry necessary to accomplish these results is consequently conventional and will not be described here. FIG. 9, does however show what may be added to such conventional circuitry to enable it to carry out the additional functions set forth above.

Let it be considered, therefore, that a washer-extractor is equipped with at least one relatively high speed motor, one normal speed motor, and means for shifting from one to another in accordance with the requirements of a given cycle.

Shown at 35 in FIG. 9 is the solenoid controlling the application of an auxiliary brake forming part of such a conventional system, and the control means M3 and M4 which, when energized, cause the normal speed motor to be driven counterclockwise and clockwise respectively. These controls are alternately energized during the washing cycle in a conventional manner by a cam actuated switch 25, forming no part of the invention, which is shown merely because the controls for the normal speed motor are used in my novel circuit. The controls for the high speed motor, on the other hand, are not shown, since this motor is not used during spotting. FIG. 9 shows instead the controls M2 and M5 for a third slow inch motor which, when energized, cause that motor to be driven counterclockwise and clockwise respectively.

The point at which the basket will be spotted is determined by the position of a spot-selector (not shown) which comprises a dial having five peripheral indicia, e.g., A, B, C, D, E, and a pointer which may be rotated so as to point to any one of these indicia.

The pointer is fixed to a shaft carrying five ganged selector switches, CCW, CW, PO, LE and LA, each having five corresponding contacts A, B, C, D, E, with which the movable arms of these switches are brought into contact when the spot-selector is set to A, B, C, D and E respectively.

Terminals B and C of selector switch CCW and A and D of selector switch CW are connected through the common point R, to R, a point which is connected to one terminal of either the CCW control M2 for the slow inch motor or the CCW control M3 for the normal speed motor, depending on the position of the switch SIR4 forming part of the relay SIR, which will be hereinafter described. Terminal D of selector switch CCW and terminals B, C and E of CW are connected through common point S to S, a point which is connected to one terminal of the CW control M4 for the normal speed motor, or to one terminal of the CW control M5 for the slow inch motor, depending on the position of the switch SIRZ which also forms part of the relay SIR.

The center terminal POC of selector switch PO is connected to the control electrode of a triac POT; the center terminal LEC of selector switch LE is connected to the control electrode of a triac LET, and the center terminal LAC of selector switch LA is connected to the control electrode of triac LAT.

The output terminal of LET is connected in series with the solenoid of lead relay LER; the output of LAT in series with the solenoid of lag relay LAR, and the output of POT in series with the solenoid of position rotation relay POR.

The contact B of switch PO, and the contacts C and D of LE, are connected to the inputs of LET, LAT and POT through a circuit controlled by photocell P2; the contacts C and D of PO, the contact B of LE, and the contact C of switch LA, are connected to the inputs of LET, LAT and POT through a circuit controlled by photocell P1.

The contact B of LA is connected to the inputs of LET, LAT and POT through a circuit controlled by photocell P3 and the contact D of selector switch LA is connected to the inputs of LET, LAT and POT through a circuit controlled by photocell P4.

Triacs LET, LAT and POT are semi-conductors which act as gates, in the manner of thyratrons, passing current to energize LER, LAR and POR respectively when a circuit through the control terminal of the corresponding triac, a selector switch, and a photocell is completed. Obviously, these triacs could be replaced by thyratrons, or equivalent gating means.

The circuit also includes a clutch control 36 which, when in one position, connects the slow speed motor to drive the cylinder, and when in the other position connects the normal (wash speed motor) to drive the cylinder.

The operation of the clutch, brake and motors is controlled by the three relays LER, LAR, and POR, the switches of which are shown distributed about the circuit diagram to facilitate illustration of the electrical circuit, but it will of course be appreciated that each switch hereinafter described as a component of a given relay is so associated with the solenoid of that relay (indicated by LER, LAR, and POR on the drawing) as to be opened and closed by energization and de-energization of that solenoid.

Considering first the lead relay LER, this controls only two sets of contacts LER-1 and LER-2. Contacts LERl are normally closed and positioned between Q and the center terminal of CW. Contacts LERZ are normally open and positioned between Q and the center terminal of CCW. When LER is energized, contacts LER-21 are closed and contacts LERl are opened. LER is thus essentially a solenoid controlled single-pole, double throw switch.

The relay LAR comprises two sets of contacts, LAR-1, which are normally closed, between Q and the center terminal of CCW, and LAR-2, normally open, between one side L2 of the supply line and the slow inch relay SIR, which will be hereinafter described. When the solenoid of LAR is energized contacts LAR-1 are opened and contacts LAR-2 are closed.

The relay POR controls the following sets of contacts:

POR-1, normally closed, connecting the line Q-CCW to the line Q-CW;

POR-2, normally open, between Q and CCW;

POR-3, normally open, between L2 and the slow inch relay SIR;

POR4, and L2 The slow inch relay SIR comprises a solenoid connected in series with contacts POR-3 and contacts LAR-2 betwen the mains L1 and L2, and controls the following sets of contacts:

SIR-1, normally open, the closure of which actuates the clutch control 36;

SIR-2, normally closed, connecting common point S to normal speed CW control M4;

SIR-3, normally open, connecting common point S to slow speed CW control M5;

SIR-4, normally closed, connecting common point R to normal speed CCW control M3;

SIR5, normally open, between common point R and slow speed CCW control M2; and

SIR-6, normally open, in series with auxiliary brake 35.

The operation of the electrical circuit will now be described, assuming that the machine is rotating clockwise, and it is desired to bring it to a stop in a position such that the left-hand door can be opened for unloading.

The ganged selector switches are first set to position B.

In the course of rotation, once the Stop button has has been pressed to open contacts 50 thus cutting out the high speed motor and the reversing cam 25, and the normally open, between the solenoid of POR contacts 58, 59 have been closed to light up the lamps G1, G2, G3, G4, the leading edge E2 of the opening in the cam 31 will pass between the photocell P1 and the lamp G1 opposite that photocell, so that the photocell becomes conductive, closing a circuit from terminal B of selctor LEC through photocell P1 and transistor LET so that the solenoid of relay LER is actuated. Contacts LER-1 open, and contacts LER-2 close, but since contacts POR1 are still closed and POR-2 open, switch CW, and the control for the normal speed motor are still connected for CW operation through S, S' and the normally closed contacts SIR-2 of the slow inch relay.

The leading edge of the opening in the cam 31 will then pass between photocell P2 and the corresponding lamp, so that P2 becomes conductive, closing a circuit from terminal B of selector PO through photocell P2 and transistor POT, so that the solenoid of relay POR is energized. This closes contacts POR2, while opening POR-1. (This would complete a circuit betwen L1 and L2 through Q, contacts LER-2, POR-2, and LAR-1, switch CCW, R, R and contacts SIR-4 to the control M3 causing the normal speed motor to drive the basket counterclockwise, if it were not for the fact that the trailing edge of the opening in the cam simultaneously passes P1, so that it is no longer illuminated, thus causing LERI to close and LER-2 to open, so that the basket is still driven clockwise.) The by-pass circuit through POR-1 to switch CW is simultaneously broken by the opening of contacts POR-1. Contacts POR-4 are simultaneously closed, completing a direct connection between L2 and POR, so that the solenoid POR will remain energized regardless of the state of POT. Contacts POR-3 are also closed, but this has no immediate effect.

Further rotation of the cam will render photocell P4 conductive, but since this is connected only to contact D of selector LA, while the arm of LA is set at B, nothing happens.

Rotation of the cam next causes illumination of photocell P3, at 252, and:

(l) Triac LAT is rendered conductive, by completion of a circuit through LA and P-3, thus energizing relay LAR.

(2) Contacts LAR-1 open, opening the circuit to the CCW drive control M3, but this was already open, due to the opening of LER2.

(3) Contacts LAR-2 close, energizing the solenoid of the slow inch relay SIR. This has the following result:

(a) Contacts SIR-1 close, energizing clutch transformer 36 to cause engagement of a slow inch drive instead of the normal speed drive.

(b) Contacts SIR-2, open and SIR3 close, so that the slow CW control insetad of the normal clockwise control is connected to point S.

(c) Contacts SIR'4, normally closed, are opened and SIR5, normally open, are closed, connecting common point R to slow speed CCW control M2 instead of the normal speed CCW control.

((1) Contacts SIR-6 close applying auxiliary brake 35 to further slow the basket.

The basket is still driven clockwise, but now by the slow inch drive under heavy braking.

The leading edge of the cam opening now again exposes P1, energizing LER, opening LER-1 and closing LER2. This time, however, POR-1 is still held open by the holding circuit through POR4, and POR2 is closed so that the circuit through CW is broken and the one through CCW closed, and the basket is now driven CCW toward P3.

As soon, however, as the edge E which was, during CW rotation, the trailing edge of the cam opening, passes P3, contacts LAR-1 open, breaking the CCW driving circuit. If, at the same time, P1 remains illuminated, LER-1 is also open, both drives are cut off, and the basket is at rest in position to unload left.

If, on the other hand, the basket has travelled far enough so that the edge E of the cam opening obscures P1, LER-1 closes, and the basket is again driven clockwise, until P1 is again illuminated, thus closing LER-1, opening LER-2 and cutting off the CW drive. If, at this time P3 remains illuminated, LAR1 is also open and the basket is stopped.

If the basket has gone too far P3 is obscured, LAR-1 closes, and, since LER2 is closed, the CCW drive circuit is closed, and the basket is driven counterclockwise.

This hunting continues until the basket comes to rest with both P1 and P3 illuminated and both driving circuits therefore broken.

If, after the lamps are turned on, the leading edge of the cam should pass P3 first, contacts LAR-1 and LAR2 would close, but nothing would happen, since POR-2, POR-3, and LER-2 would be open. As soon as the leading edge of the cam subsequently passed P1, its trailing edge would pass P3, permitting contacts LAR-1 and LAR2 to close, so that the situation would thereafter be the same as if P1 were the first photocell passed by the leading edge of the cam after the lamps had been lighted. If the leading edge should pass P4 first, this would have no effect, as P4 is not connected during the unload left cycle. If the leading edge should pass P2 first, contacts POR1 would open and contacts POR-2 would close, but this would have no immediate effect with contacts LER-2 open and contacts LER-1 closed. Similarly, closing of contacts POR-3 would have no immediate effect with contacts LAR-2 open, but closing of contacts POR4 would keep POR energized. Subsequent exposure of P4 will have no effect, for the reason already pointed out. Subsequent exposure of P3 will open contacts LAR-1, but this has no immediate effect since contacts LER2 are still open and contacts POR1 are now open.

Closing of contacts LAR-2 will, however, energize the solenoid of relay SIR, thus closing contacts SlR1 to shift the clutch to slow speed drive, shifting both the CW and CCW motor controls to slow speed, by operation of SIR-2, SIR-3, SIR4 and SIR-5, and applying the brake 35 by closing SIR-6. There will, however, be no change of direction, since LER1 is still closed and LER2 is still open, so that the drive is still clockwise.

When, however, the leading edge of the cam passes P1, contacts LER1 will open and contacts LER2 will close, reversing the direction of rotation, whereupon the machine will hunt as hereinbefore described, until the basket comes to rest at the desired location.

It will thus be seen that the basket must rotate through an arc sufficient for the leading edge of the cam to pass, while travelling clockwise, either from P1 to P3, or from P2 to P1, in either case more than half a revolution, before hunting begins.

If the basket should be travelling counterclockwise when the spot selector is set to position B for unloading through the left hand housing door, the normally closed circuit through Q, LER1, CW, S, S and M4 will cause an immediate reversal unless the open section of the cam happens to be opposite P1. In that case reversal will occur as soon as the open section of the cam has passed by P1. The cycle is then the same as if the basket had originally been rotating clockwise.

When the basket is to be unloaded through the righthand door of the housing, the spot selector pointer, and consequently the movable arms of all the selector switches, are set at position D, and it will be seen from FIG. 9 that photocell P2 is then connected to LER, photocell P1 to POR and P4 to LAR. With the switches thus positioned, the basket will be driven counterclockwise until both POR and LAR have been energized, after which energization of LER will initiate hunting, until the basket comes to rest with both photocells P1 and P2 illuminated.

When the machine is to be stopped with each cylinder door aligned with a housing door, for loading, the selector 8 switches are set to position C, and it will be seen that P2 is thereby connected to LER, and that P1 is connected to both LAR and POR.

The operation is again essentially the same as before, except that POR is energized at the same time as LAR when the leading edge of the cam first passes the photocell P1, and LER is then effective as soon thereafter as P2 is illuminated. The reason for this is that it is not necessary to ensure a full rotation when spotting the basket for loading, since at that time there are no clothes in the basket which need to be bunched in a particular location.

Positions A and E on the selector switch are used to permit manual inching of the machine in counterclockwise and clockwise directions respectively.

It will, of course, be appreciated that the embodiment of applicants invention which has just been described has been given purely by way of example, and may be modified as to detail without thereby departing from the basic principles of the invention defined by the following claims. For example, the photocells and the lamps cooperating therewith could be replaced by switches operated by physical contact with segments of the cam, or by magnetic switches actuated by the passage of cam segments. The triacs could be replaced by thyratrons, or any suitable gating means. The entire circuit of FIG. 9 may, of course, be integrated into a more complex circuit for controlling the entire cycle of operations of an automatic commercial laundry machine, such as a washer-extractor.

In the specific embodiment disclosed, the arc subtended by each door has been given as 108a little less than /3 of a circle, and the preferred range is to However, it will be appreciated that the minimum is determined simply by how small an opening you are prepared to acceptthe smaller the opening, the more inconvenient the machine is to load and unload. The maximum limit is determined by the fact that one edge of the door is in a 12 oclock position when the laundry is being unloaded, and the other edge must then be in a position having a sufiicient horizontal component to provide a surface over which the clothes can be conveniently slid in and out of the machine. In extreme cases the arc of each door may be as great as The invention may also be applied to a pass-through laundry machine of the type commonly used in hospitals, in which dirty laundry is introduced into one end of the machine from a dirty room and withdrawn from the other end of the machine in aclean room, with the machine mounted in the wall between the two rooms. In that case both ends of the cylinder will be provided with a pair of doors, one into each compartment, and each end of the housing will be provided with a pair of corresponding doors, or with a single door. The positions and arcuate dimensions of the doors at each end will be the same as those of the doors at the single end illustrated in the accompanying drawings, and when there are two housing doors at each end the spotting cycle will be essentially the same. The only difference will be that when the basket is spotted for loading the doors at the dirty end will be opened, and when it is spotted in either position for unloading, a door at the clean end will be opened.

In certain pass-through machines, however, it is impractical to provide two housing doors at each end and each housing end therefore has only one door. In that case, the cylinder must be spotted twice for loading from the dirty side, bringing each cylinder door at the dirty end into registration once with the dirty side housing door which is at the left as viewed from the dirty side. Similarly the cylinder must be spotted twice for unloading from the clean side, bringing each cylinder door at that end once into registration with the clean side housing door. In this case the cam opening will subtend and the photocells will be positioned to stop the basket in any selected one of four positions. For unloading, at the clean end, each cylinder door at the clean end will be registered in turn with the housing door if that end, with the radial edge of the cylinder door nearest the partition aligned with the lower edge of the housing door, as shown in FIG. 10. For loading, at the dirty end, each cylinder door at the dirty end will be registered in turn with the housing door at that end, with the radial edge of the cylinder door aligned with the vertical edge of the housing door, as shown in FIG. 11. The photocells P5, P6, P7, P8, will be positioned as shown in FIG. 12.

The basic circuit for such a machine as shown in FIG. 13, aside from the changed individual connections of the photocells, operates essentially as the circuit of FIG. 9. It will, however, be noted that, for convenience, a selector switch is provided at each end of the machine, and a transfer relay 100 is provided for switching the control of the machine from one selector switch to the other by breaking contacts 100-A, 100-B, 100-C and closing contacts 100-D, 100E, 100-F. As shown in FIG. 13, switches PO-D, LE-D and LA-D perform the functions of PO, LE, LA from the dirty side and PO-K, LE-K and LA-K perform these functions from the clean side. Since all inching is done counterclockwise (as seen from the end in question) separate CW and CCW switches are unnecessary and their combined functions are approximated by V and V It will be appreciated that PO-D, LE-D, LA-D and V are ganged to act together, as are PO-K, LE-K, LA-K and V As disclosed, M3 and M4 are controls for a normal speed motor, M2 and M5 are controls for a separate slow speed motor, and 36 controls a clutch between the slow speed motor and the drive shaft so that When this clutch is engaged the shaft is driven at an inching speed even slower than the speed otherwise resulting from connection to the slow speed motor. It will be appreciated, however, that three separate motors might be provided, or a three speed clutch provided to control a single motor. The choice is determined largely by the relative costs of the various arrangements.

While, as a matter of convenience, when the machine is to be loaded and unloaded at the same end, two housing doors are provided at that end, it is not necessary to have two separate openings in the housing end. One opening may subtend an arc of about 240 (from about 8 oclock to 4 oclock), and each housing door will then close one half of the opening.

In this arrangement, each cylinder opening and door may subtend an arc greater than half the arc subtended by the single housing opening, and this can be quite advantageous, since the larger the cylinder doors, the easier it is to load and unload the cylinder. When one side of the cylinder is to be unloaded, the compartment wall will be spotted parallel to the edge of the housing opening at the eight oclock position, with the opening in the cylinder compartment to be loaded extending from the eight oclock to the one or two oclock position, with both housing doors open. Similarly, the opening in the other compartment can be spotted for unloading with the compartment wall parallel to the edge of the housing opening in the four oclock position and the cylinder opening extending to the ten or eleven oclock position, depending on the size of the cylinder opening.

Either compartment may then be spotted for loading wherever convenient to facilitate the use of an automatic loading device, so long as the useful portion of the opening in that compartment registers with some portion of the housing opening.

The circuitry will be similar to that of FIG. 9, except that sufiicient photocells must be provided to provide four spotting positions instead of three.

It will also be appreciated that while the illustrated embodiment of the invention has been referred to as a laundry machine, it could also be a dry-cleaning machine.

What is claimed is:

1. In a cleaning machine comprising a housing, a cylinder mounted to rotate about a horizontal axis within said housing, a diametral axial partition dividing said cylinder into two compartments, and access means permitting ma terial to be cleaned to be loaded into and removed from said compartments, the improved access means which comprises a pair of doors in at least one end of said cylinder, each door affording access into one of said compartments and subtending an are substantially greater than but less than 145, each door having a first generally radial edge spaced from a first generally radial edge of the other opening by at least 70, and a second generally radial edge, the angle between said second radial edges being substantially bisected by said partition, said access means further comprising at least one door in at least one end of said housing positioned to register with a door in said cylinder when said partition is vertical with said second radial edges uppermost.

2. A cleaning machine as claimed in claim 1 in which said second radial edges are substantially parallel to each other and said partition.

3. A cleaning machine as claimed in claim 1 in which the two doors in said cylinder are substantially identical in their dimensions.

4. A cleaning machine as claimed in claim 1 in which each door means in said cylinder comprises a major portion hinged to the first edge of its opening and a minor portion hinged to the second edge thereof.

5. In combination a cleaning machine as claimed in claim 1 and chute means movable between a loading position for delivering material to be cleaned through said doors into said compartments and a distant position clear of said doors permitting laundry to be unloaded through said doors.

6. A machine as claimed in claim 1 in which said cylinder openings subtend an arc of between and 7. In a cleaning machine comprising a housing, a cylinder mounted to rotate about a horizontal axis within said housing, a diametral axial partition dividing said cylinder into two compartments, and access means permitting ma terial to be cleaned to be loaded into and removed from said compartments, the improved access means which comprises a pair of doors in one end of said cylinder, one of which affords access to each compartment, and a pair of doors in one end of said housing, each housing door having a lower radial edge which slopes downwardly away from the axis of said cylinder, said doors being so positioned that one compartment door is in registration with one housing door with said partition parallel to the lower radial edge of said one housing door, and the other compartment door is in registration with the other housing door with said partition parallel to the lower radial edge of said other housing door.

8. A cleaning machine as claimed in claim 7 in which said pair of compartment doors is in registration with said pair of housing doors with said partition vertical.

9. A cleaning machine as claimed in claim 8 comprising a pair of housing doors and a pair of cylinder doors at each end of said housing and cylinder respectively.

10. In a cleaning machine comprising a cylinder having a transverse wall at each end and mounted to rotate about a horizontal axis, drive control means for causing said cylinder to be rotated in either of two directions, an axial partition dividing said cylinder into two compartments, and a housing enclosing said cylinder, the improve ment comprising in combination:

a pair of doors in one end wall of said cylinder, one

door opening into each compartment,

a pair of doors in the corresponding end of said housing, said housing and cylinder doors being so positioned with respect to each other that at least one cylinder door is aligned with a housing door in each of a plurality of unloading positions of said cylinder doors,

cylinder door position indicating means mounted to rotate with said cylinder,

a plurality of detector means comprising pairs which define the limits between which said indicating means must be located whenever a cylinder door occupies any one of said unloading positions, and being adapted to emit a signal when said indicating means reaches one of said limits,

and selector means for selectively connecting to said drive control means the pair of detector means defining the limits for any given unloading position so that the emission of a signal by either one of said connected pair of detector means causes a reversal in the direction in which said cylinder is driven, thus causing hunting of said indicating means between the limits at which said connected pair of detector means are located, until the simultaneous emission of signals by both of said connected pair of detecting means causes cessation of said drive.

11. A cleaning machine as claimed in claim 10, in which said drive means is capable of driving said cylinder at a plurality of speeds, one slower than the other, and the connection completed, when said selector means connects a pair of said detector means to said drive means, causes said cylinder to be driven at said slower speed.

12. A cleaning machine as claimed in claim 10 comprising means for delaying completion of said connections between said selected pair of detector means and said control means until said cylinder has completed more than half of a revolution in a selected direction.

13. A cleaning machine as claimed in claim 12 in which said selector means comprises means for connecting a third detector means to control the connection between said selected pair of detector means and said drive means to prevent completion of said last mentioned connection until said indicating means has passed both said third detector means and at least one detector means of said selected pair.

14. A cleaning machine as claimed in claim 12 in which each housing door has a lower radial edge which slopes downwardly away from the axis of said cylinder, said selector means has two settings in each of which said detector means are connected to stop the cylinder with said partition parallel to one of said lower edges, and in each setting said selector means completes a connection to said drive means causing said cylinder to be driven during said more than half of a revolution in a direction such that the cylinder door being aligned with a housing door passes through its lowermost position less than half a revolution before hunting begins.

15. A cleaning machine as claimed in claim 10 in which the pair of cylinder doors may be aligned with the pair of doors in the housing with said partition vertical, said detector means comprise a pair defining the limits between which said indicating means must be located when said cylinder doors occupy said loading position, and said selector means is capable of connecting said last mentioned pair of detector means to actuate said drive control means in the same manner as either of said other pairs of detecting means.

16. A cleaning machine as claimed in claim 10 comprising identical sets of cylinder and housing doors at each end of the machine.

17. A cleaning machine as claimed in claim 10 in which said detector means comprise photocells.

18. A cleaning machine as claimed in claim 10 in which said detector means comprise switches and said indicating means is a cam positioned to operate said switches.

19. A cleaning machine as claimed in claim 10 in which said selector means comprises a plurality of selector switches and transistor triodes having their control electrodes connected in series with one of said switches and with said detector means.

20. A cleaning machine as claimed in claim 10in which said selector means comprises a plurality of selector switches and a plurality of thyratrons, each having its control electrode connected in series with one of said switches and with said detector means.

21. In a cleaning machine comprising a cylinder having a transverse wall at each end and mounted to rotate about a horizontal axis, drive control means for causing said cylinder to be rotated in either of two directions, an axial partition dividing said cylinder into two compartments, and a housing enclosing said cylinder, the improvement comprising in combination:

a pair of doors in at least one end Wall of said cylinder,

one door opening into each compartment,

at least one door in said housing at each end thereof adjacent a cylinder end provided with a door, said housing and cylinder doors being so positioned with respect to each other that at least one cylinder door is aligned with a housing door in each of a plurality of unloading positions of said cylinder doors,

cylinder door position indicating means mounted to rotate with said cylinder,

a plurality of detector means comprising pairs which define the limits between which said indicating means must be located whenever a cylinder door occupies any one of said unloading positions, and being adapted to emit a signal when said indicating means reaches one of said limits,

and selector means for selectively connecting to said drive control means the pair of detector means defining the limits for any given unloading position so that the emission of a signal by either one of said connected pair of detector means causes a reversal in the direction in which said cylinder is driven, thus causing hunting of said indicating means between the limits at which said connected pair of detector means are located, until the simultaneous emission of signals by both of said connected pair of detecting means causes cessation of said drive.

22. In a cleaning machine comprising a housing, a cylinder mounted to rotate about a horizontal axis within said housing, a diametral axial partition dividing said cylinder into two compartments, and access means permitting material to be cleaned to be loaded into and removed from said compartments, the improved access means which comprises a pair of doors in each end of said cylinder, one of which affords access to each compartment, and one door in each end of said housing, each housing door having a lower radial edge which slopes downwardly away from the axis of said cylinder, said doors being so positioned that each compartment door at one end registers with the housing door at that end with said partition vertical, and that each compartment door at the other end registers with the housing door at the other end with said partition parallel to the lower radial edge of said last mentioned housing door.

23. In a cleaning machine comprising a housing, a cylinder mounted to rotate about a horizontal axis in said housing, a diametral axial partition dividing said cylinder into two compartments, and access means permitting material to be cleaned to be loaded into and removed from said compartments, the improved access means which comprises door means in at least one end of said cylinder and door means in at least one end of said housing transverse to said cylinder axis, said door means being so positioned that at least one cylinder door will register with at least one housing door with said partition vertical, and at least one cylinder door will register with at least one housing door with said partition more nearly horizontal than vertical and slanting downward from the axis of said cylinder toward the radially outermost edge of said door.

24. In a cleaning machine comprising a housing, a cylinder mounted to rotate about a horizontal axis in said housing, a diametral axial partition dividing said cylinder into two compartments, and access means permitting material to be cleaned to be loaded into and removed from said compartments, the improved access means which comprises a separate door in said cylinder leading to each compartment and door means in at least one end of said housing transverse to said cylinder axis, said cylinder doors and housing door means being so positioned that each cylinder door may be aligned with door means in said housing in a loading position with said partition more nearly vertical than horizontal, and in unloading position with said partition more nearly horizontal than vertical.

25. A cleaning machine as claimed in claim 24 in which both cylinder doors may be simultaneously aligned in said loading position with door means in said housing.

26. A cleaning machine as claimed in claim 24 comprising means for automatically stopping said cylinder with any selected cylinder door in alignment with a housing door.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 10/1951 Buss 68-143 5/ 1960 Gerlach 68210 X 10/1960 Heft et al 68-143 X 5/1967 Starr et a1. 68-210 US. Cl. X.R.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,529,450 Dated September 22,1970

Invent fls) NORVIN L. PELLERIN It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

In the heading insert:

-assignor to Pellerin Milnor Corporation, New Orleans,

Louisiana-- SIGNED Mb .QE'AEED NV 1 2m (SEAL) Am WW I. :2 I. v I A... Officur eomissiom of ram FORM PO-IOSO (10-69) uscoMM-oc scan-Pee Q U.S GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: IIII 0-!ll-8ll

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3712090 *Feb 7, 1972Jan 23, 1973Ellis CorpLaundry machine and loading structure therefor
US4835993 *Apr 23, 1987Jun 6, 1989Washex Machinery CorporationCommercial/industrial washing machine
US5357772 *Apr 19, 1993Oct 25, 1994American Laundry Machinery, Ltd.Laundry machine with combination drum door/loading hopper
US5421049 *May 11, 1994Jun 6, 1995American Laundry Machinery, Inc.Method of laundering items in a laundry machine with a combination drum door/loading hopper
US6463768Jun 20, 2000Oct 15, 2002Ellis CorporationCommercial laundry machine with improved loading hopper
US6792777Sep 12, 2002Sep 21, 2004Ellis CorporationCommercial laundry machine with improved loading hopper
US8072210Dec 6, 2007Dec 6, 2011Itw Industrial Components S.R.L. Con Unico SocioDetecting device of the angular position of a rotating member of an electric household appliance
US20030019254 *Sep 12, 2002Jan 30, 2003Ellis CorporationCommercial laundry machine with improved loading hopper
US20030172689 *Aug 20, 2001Sep 18, 2003Fitton Nicholas GeraldLaundry appliance
US20050050926 *Sep 20, 2004Mar 10, 2005Ellis CorporationCommercial laundry machine with improved loading hopper
US20100164486 *Dec 6, 2007Jul 1, 2010Itw Industrial Components S.R.L. Con Unico SocioDetecting device of the angular position of a rotating member of an electric household appliance, in particular the drum of a washing machine
EP0030216A1 *Oct 24, 1980Jun 10, 1981MERLONI ELETTRODOMESTICI S.p.A.Washing machine basket positioning device
Classifications
U.S. Classification68/143, 68/210
International ClassificationD06F37/10, D06F37/30, D06F37/08, D06F37/00, D06F37/28
Cooperative ClassificationD06F37/10, D06F37/28, D06F37/302, D06F37/08
European ClassificationD06F37/28, D06F37/10, D06F37/08, D06F37/30B