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Publication numberUS3531036 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 29, 1970
Filing dateApr 16, 1968
Priority dateApr 16, 1968
Also published asDE1815028A1
Publication numberUS 3531036 A, US 3531036A, US-A-3531036, US3531036 A, US3531036A
InventorsFelson Ronald
Original AssigneeSwingline Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrically driven actuator for stapling machines
US 3531036 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Se t.- 29, 1970' ELECTRICALLY DRIVEN ACTUATOR FOR STABLING MACHINES Filed April 16, 1968 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. RONALD FELSON BY} A I ATTORNEY 3,531,036 7 ELEcTRIcALLY DRIVEN ACTUATOR FOR sTAPL-ING MACHINES H Filed April 16, 1968 R. F ELSON Sept. 29, 1970 eats-Sheet 2' -'1NVENTOR.

, RONALD FELSON A r TORNEV Sept? 29,1970 R.- FELSON 3,531,036

ELECTRICALLY DRIVEN ACTUATOR FOR STAPLING MACHINES Filed April 16,. 1968 3 Sheets-sheet I 41%. Ill. 1 I

INVENTOR.

RONALD FELSON A TTOR/VEV United States Patent 3,531,036 ELECTRICALLY DRIVEN ACTUATOR FOR STAPLING MACHINES Ronald Felson, Laurelton, N.Y., assignor to Swingline Inc., Long Island City, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed Apr. 16, 1968, Ser. No. 721,707 Int. Cl. B27f 7/06 U.S. Cl. 227-7 9 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE An actuating mechanism is shown which includes a solenoid having an armature which is secured to an inclined arm. The arm bears a spring which is also connected to the solenoid and biases the arm into retracted position. A tripping switch is manually actuated to produce a cycle of drive. A disengaging mechanism is operated by the arm and is tripped when the device is in cycle. This mechanism turns off the tripping switch upon completion of a drive cycle. The arm is disposable against the cap of a stapling machine so as to drive the same.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to an electrically driven actuator for stapling machines and is designed for relatively low cost operation where axiliary power is desired in order to operate a relatively light-duty stapling machine.

Conventionally light-duty stapling machines are utilized in various light industrial applications. For example, some of the applications in which machines of this type are employed are in affixing tags to garments for dry-cleaning, affixing handles to packages in retail stores, affixing one element to another in light industrial applications such as stapling together a covering over an article, repeatedly stapling together sheets of paper in offices, and other applications of this type.

Where the number of applications of staples into work during the course of a day are relatively large, it is poor practice to provide the employees involved with handoperated stapling machines. The operators will tire of the repeated arm movements required and inefiiciencies will result. However, since the relative force of the applications is light the normal industrial type of motordriven stapling machine is too costly for this type of operation. The actuator of this invention is the solution.

The actuator of this invention also includes structure which automatically disengages the switch means of this invention after completion of the driving stroke of the machine. This prevents overloading of the solenoid involved.

The mechanism of this invention also includes tripping means which are effective to operate the same.

The invention may be briefly described as comprising an actuating mechanism having actuating means including an inclined arm. The actuating means are preferbly a solenoid and armature and the arm is connected to the armature. Stapling machine supporting means are provided adjacent the arm so that the arm may selectively be placed in abutting relationship with the cap of a stapling machine. The mechanism also preferably includes a disengaging element which is operated by the arm and which will disengage the switch means of this invention after the termination of a stroke arm.

The invention will now be further described by reference to the accompanying drawings which are made a part of this specification.

FIG. 1 is a side view, partly in section, of the actuating mechanism of this invention with a stapling machine Patented Sept. 29, 1970 in position thereupon. In this view the mechanism is in its normal rest position.

FIG. 2 is a view similar to that of FIG. 1 but showing the position of the parts after tripping of the switch means and with the arm portion of this invention driving the stapling machine into its maximum driven position.

FIG. 3 is a rear view of the actuating mechanism of this invention.

FIG. 4 is a detail somewhat diagrammatic view of the mechanism which disengages the switch means of the actuator of this invention after completion of a driving stroke of the arm.

The invention will now be further described by reference to the specific form thereof as shown in the accompanying drawings. In this connection, however, the reader is cautioned to note that the specific form of the invention shown herein is for illustrative purposes and for purposes of example only. Various changes and modifications could obviously be made within the spirit and scope of this invention.

The actuating mechanism 11 of this invention includes a mounting frame 14 which bears a cover portion 12. Mounting frame 14 carries a plurality of spaced rib portions 13 which are adapted to embraceably retain the base 16 of a stapling machine 15. The stapling machine 15 also includes a magazine portion 18 and a cap 17.

A solenoid 19 is disposed in downwardly inclined relationship within mounting frame 14 and includes an armature 20. The solenoid is supported in position by screws (not shown) which extend through openings 21.

Secured within supports 22 is tripping arm 23 which bears handle 29 at its forward portion. Handle 29 is a manual trip which is actuated by pushing. An automatic paper trip member 24 is formed with a pair of movable handle portions 24a which optionally embrace tripping arm 23 and thereby permit portion 24 to be moved along arm 23.

Arm 23 bears an offset portion 25 and an additional operating portion 26 which includes a flat end portion 33. An additional support 27 is provided and a spring 28 is disposed between offset portion 25 and support 27. Spring 28 normally biases trip lever 23 in the disengaged position.

End portion 33 of operating portion 26 is normally in abutting relationship with arm 31 of operating switch 30. However arm 31 can also be disposed below the end portion 33 of operating portion 26.

A pair of arms 34 and 35 are secured to armature 20 of solenoid 19 by means of pin 36 which passes through arms 34 and 35 and also through armature 20. Pin 36 is secured in position by retainers 32.

Rollers 37 and 38 are also disposed upon pin 36.

An additional actuator 39 is secured to the opposite end portion of arms 34 and 35 and normally lies upon cap 17 of stapling machine 15 and cam surface 14a of frame 14. A spring 40 has one end disposed around a pin 42 located within arms 34 and 35 and has its opposite end portion disposed within a support 41 which is secured to solenoid 19. Spring 40 normally biases arms 34 and 35 into retracted position.

A trip element 43 is provided to disengage the switch means after completion of the actuating stroke of the mechanism of this invention. Element 43 includes a top portion 44 which is selectively abuttable with roller 37 and a side portion 45 and a bridge portion 46. Portion 45 is attached to rivet 45a which is secured to frame 14. Portion 46 of element 43 is also selectively abuttable with switch arm 31.

An inlet wire 53 is connected to a source of power and includes a pair of conductors. One of the conductors 48 is connected to on-off switch 47 and the other conductor 49 is connected to junction block 50. A connector 51 is connected to one pole of switch 30 and a connector 52 connected to the opposite pole of switch 30.

Connector 52 is connected to junction block 50 through terminal 56 and connector 49 is connected to junction block 50 through terminal 57. Obviously terminals 56 and 57 are insulated from one another.

Wires 54 and 55 are also connected to terminals 58 and 59 of junction block 50. Terminals 57 and 58 and 56 and 59 are, of course, joined to one another.

With the foregoing specific description the operation of this invention may now be explained.

The stapling machine of this invention is placed in position between elements 13 on frame 14. Prior to such placement staples have been placed within magazine 18 of the stapling machine.

Trip 24 is put in proper position along rod 23 if automatic tripping is desired.

Trip 23 is then moved rearwardly so that portion 33 thereof contacts switch arm 31 of switch 30. Arm 31 is normally biased into open position but is forced into the closed position by the pressure of portion 33. The closure of switch 30 causes power to flow into solenoid 19 and causes armature 20 and arms 34 and 35 to move forwardly. This movement is extremely rapid upon closure of switch and will generally be completed long before the operator can manually open switch 30 to prevent current from continuing to flow into solenoid 19.

The forward movement of arms 34 and 35 causes actuator 39 to move forwardly against the cap 17 of the stapling machine. At the same time actuator 39 bears against cam surface 14a. The above movements cause cap 17 to be depressed and the parts then assume the position shown in FIG. 2. This movement actuates the stapling machine and causes stapling to occur.

If the operator continues to hold portion 33 against switch arm 31 power will still be automatically cut off to solenoid 19 to prevent overloading and damage thereto. This is accomplished by the member 43. As roller 37 moves forwardly it bears against portion 44 and thus applies pressure to portion 46. This pressure is applied downwardly to switch arm 31 and moves it out of contact with portion 33. Arm 31 then springably moves into open position and power is removed from the solenoid.

This safety mechanism is necessary in order to prevent power to be applied to the solenoid even though the driving stroke is completed which could cause burn out of the solenoid.

As power is removed from the solenoid spring re turns arms 34 and 35 to their normal disengaged position ready for a succeeding stroke.

The foregoing sets forththe manner in which the objects of this invention are achieved.

I claim:

1. An electrically driven stapling machine actuator including a housing including a stapling machine holding portion, 'a downwardly inclined horizontal solenoid having a movable armature disposed above said stapling machine holding portion, a downwardly inclined actuating arm secured to said armature having a leading portion adapted to abut the cap portion of a stapling machine, spring means secured to said arm and said solenoid normally biasing said arm in disengaged position, an elongated tripping lever secured to said housing, a switch element normally abutting said tripping lever, and means controlled by said arm adapted to disengage said switch element from closed position when said arm is driven into engaged position.

2/ An electrically driven stapling machine actuator comprising, in combination, a housing having a stapling machine holding portion thereupon adapted to support a stapling machine having a cap member adapted to produce staple driving by downward pressure thereupon, said housing also having a downwardly inclined roof portion adjacent said cap member, an actuating member having a portion at the forward end thereof in abutting relationship with both said cap memberand said roof portion, and power means for moving said actuating member forwardly so that said abutting portion produces a constantly increasing downward pressure upon said cap member.

3. An electrically driven stapling machine actuator as described in claim 2 including switch means adapted to activate and deactivate said power means.

4. An electrically driven stapling machine actuator as described in claim 3 said power means being a downwardly inclined horizontal solenoid and said actuating member being also downwardly inclined.

5. An electrically driven stapling machine actuator as described in claim 4 including a switch member, trip means adapted to turn said switch to on position and a triangular control member connected to the rear end of said actuating member adapted to turn said switch to off position upon completion of the driving stroke of said solenoid.

6. An electrically driven stapling machine actuator as described in claim 5, the portion of said triangular control member abutting the rear end of said actuating member being inclined.

7. An electrically driven stapling machine actuator as described in claim 6 including spring means secured to said solenoid and said actuating member and biasing said member into disengaged position.

8. An electrically driven stapling device comprising, in combination, an actuator housing having a stapling machine holding portion therewithin, a stapling machine within said holding portion, said stapling machine having a base, a magazine pivotally connected to said base, a cap overlying said magazine and staple driving means connected to said cap and actuatable by downward movement thereof, said actuator housing also having a downwardly inclined roof portion adjacent said cap member; an actuating member having a portion at the forward end thereof in abutting relationship with both said cap member and said roof portion and power means for moving said actuating member forwardly so that said abutting portion produces a constantly increasing downward pressure upon said cap member and thus causes stapling to occur.

9. A device as described in claim 8 said portion at the forward end of said actuating member being a wheel member.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,940,980 12/1933 Svenson.

2,403,947 7/1946 Oussani 227-131 XR 2,643,307 6/ 195,3 Geel.

2,947,002 8/ 1960 Moore.

3,022,512 2/1962 Oussani 227-131 XR 3,282,489 11/1966 March 227131 XR GRANVILLE Y. CUSTER, JR., Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1940980 *Mar 18, 1932Dec 26, 1933Svenson SvenPower actuator
US2403947 *May 19, 1944Jul 16, 1946Oussani James JElectric fastener driving machine
US2643307 *Aug 16, 1951Jun 23, 1953Frances E ShreveElectric switch actuator
US2947002 *Feb 11, 1957Aug 2, 1960Silabert CorpElectrically operable stapler
US3022512 *Aug 3, 1960Feb 27, 1962Oussani James JPowerized fastener
US3282489 *Jan 12, 1965Nov 1, 1966Thomas Collators IncPortable solenoid driven stapler
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4491260 *Jul 19, 1982Jan 1, 1985Jimena Carlos LElectric stapler
US4589581 *Jul 11, 1984May 20, 1986Balma, Capoduri & C., S.P.A.Electromechanical device for automating the operation of table staplers
US7857182 *Nov 27, 2006Dec 28, 2010Max Co., Ltd.Stapler
US8016175 *Feb 20, 2009Sep 13, 2011Dvells Jr Walter EAttachment for stitching tool
Classifications
U.S. Classification227/7, 227/131
International ClassificationB25C5/02, B25C5/15, B25C5/00
Cooperative ClassificationB25C5/15, B25C5/0228
European ClassificationB25C5/15, B25C5/02F1