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Publication numberUS3533629 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 13, 1970
Filing dateApr 26, 1967
Priority dateApr 26, 1967
Publication numberUS 3533629 A, US 3533629A, US-A-3533629, US3533629 A, US3533629A
InventorsRaven Richard C
Original AssigneeLempke Paul H, William Pennington
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus having means determining coincidence between player and random machine selections
US 3533629 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 13, 1970 R. c. RAVEN 3,533,629

APPARATUS HAVING MEANS DETERMINING COINCIDENCE BETWEEN PLAYER AND RANDOM MACHINE SELECTIONS Filed April 26, 1967 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 43 44 4s 4s 4 52 5s 54 55 5s s7 s2 s3 s4 65 e e 72 73 74 15 76 FIG. I

a iglCHARD C. RAVEN W RM {M HIS ATTORNEYS nnn mm m5 N m k m 8n QOM TII fl IIIIIIIIIIII II mom R. C. RAVEN Oct. 13, 1970 APPARATUS HAVING MEANS DETERMINING COINCIDENCE BETWEEN PLAYER AND RANDOM MACHINE SELECTIONS 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed April 26, 1967 R. C. RAVEN Oct. 13, 1970 PLAYER AND RANDOM MACHINE SELECTIONS 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed April 26, 1967 F Ill :1: 11] I: 111 Ill: Ill mm,

mmv Obw m l NR 321 www 3,533,629 APPARATUS HAVING MEANS DETERMINING C- INCIDENCE BETWEEN PLAYER AND RANDOM MACHINE SELECTIONS Richard C. Raven, Reno, Nev., assignor 0f one-third each to William Pennington and Paul H. Lempke, both of Reno, Nev.

Filed Apr. 26, 1967, Ser. No. 633,855 Int. Cl. A631? 5/00 U.S. Cl. 273138 18 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Game apparatus providing a field of selection devices which are manually selected by a player, a field of corresponding play-indicating devices, machine-controlled means for setting a predetermined number of playindicating devices, and means for indicating the correspondences, if any, between the devices selected by the player and the devices set by the machine. In one embodiment, the apparatus enables the player to simulate a Keno game; the number of devices that can be selected by the player may be fixed within a range, and the player can either use the group of selections used in a previous game or make his own selections.

The invention relates to a game apparatus in which one or a group of devices are chosen by a player from a field and the machine selects a subset from a field of corresponding devices the identities of which are un known to the player when he makes his selection, and the outcome of the game is determined in accordance with the number of correspondences between the devices selected by the player and those selected by the machine. Such correspondences are hereinafter called hits. While for convenience, the devices chosen by the player will be called selection devices and those chosen by the machine play-indicating devices, it will be understood that these classes of devices may in their physical embodiments be merely different parts of the same device.

In a preferred form, the game apparatus is a mechanical representation of the game Keno, and then the selection of devices by the machine is made by a random selector, so as to introduce chance into the game.

The invention further resides in the combination of various logical units which count the number of player selections, machine selections and hits; combination of units for illuminating one or more display panels for giving a visual indication of the devices selected and the number of hits, and, preferably, the progress of the game; and a control system for advancing the game through its successive stages.

A broad object of the invention is to provide a mechanical game apparatus which permits a player to select a number of selection devices (either a fixed number or a number within a predetermined range) without knowledge of the subset of play-indicating devices selected by the machine, and to be given a visual indication of the correspondences between the devices selected by him and those selected by the machine.

A further object, attained in a preferred embodiment, is to provide a game apparatus having a plurality of manually operable switches by which a player can advance the game through successive stages and, if he desires, make his own selection of selection devices, but which gives him the option of adopting the group of selection devices chosen in a prior game. Ancillary thereto, it is an object to provide a game apparatus of the character indicated with a plurality of lights which indicate the selection devices selected by the player and by the machine and which informs the player of the States. Patent choices available to him in regard to cancelling the selections used in a prior game, of making his own selections, and of initiating the display of the machine-controlled selection and the determination of the outcome of the game.

More specific objects, some or all of which are attainned in certain embodiments, are to provide a game apparatus of the type indicated above wherein:

(a) The devices selected by the player are shown by individual lamps which illuminate portions of a display field (which may include manually operable push button switches) identifying particular devices, as by numbers;

(b) The devices selected by the machine are similarly indicated by individual lamps which illuminate portions of a display field identifying the devices, and this field may be separate from that mentioned in (a) or may be the same and, when the same, may include lamps of a different color or brightness or position still within the specified portion of the field;

(c) The number of correspondences between the devices selected by the player and those selected by the machine, i.e. the hits, is counted by a counter and the total is displayed visually by a projection device;

(d) The machine-controlled selection of devices is made sequentially and at predetermined time intervals, thereby creating an element of suspense;

(e) The machine-controlled selection of devices is effected by a random selector, whereby the probability of selection of each particular device is the same as that for all other devices;

(f) The player has the choice of adopting as his own, the group of selection devices which were player-selected in a previous game and used in the game immediately preceding, or of cancelling that group of selection de vices and making new selections;

(g) The machine-controlled selection of devices is started automatically when the player has made a predetermined number of selections and the apparatus prevents additional selections by the player in excess of that number;

(h) The machine-controlled selection of devices can be initiated by the player at will after having made at least a minimum number of selections, such as one or any other number which is smaller than the predetermined number mentioned in (g), and the apparatus prevents additional selections by the player after initiating the machine-controlled selection;

(i) The apparatus includes a control system which has a series of states, each state being assumed at a successive stage of the game, and the various operations in each stage are possible only when the control system is in the corresponding state;

(j) The apparatus can be in part controlled by an attendant who checks the condition of the apparatus at the end of a game and who can then release the control system from its last state to advance to the first state, in readiness to repeat a game.

Additional objects will become apparent from the following description.

In summary, the game apparatus has a first plurality of bi-stable selection devices, such as flip-flop logic units or stepping or toggle switches, that are individually manually operable by the player into selected conditions, a second plurality of corresponding bi-stable play-indicating devices, machine-controlled means for operating a subset of the play-indicating devices into selected conditions, an means for sensing the conditions of the playindicating devices to provide an indication of the correspondences of the selection and play-indicating devices which were operated, i.e. an indication of the hits.

Hereinafter, the normal or reset or non-operated conditions of the bi-stable devices will be called their first conditions, and their operated conditions their second conditions. The term subset is used herein to denote a group smaller than all of the devices in the set. By corresponding devices is meant that there is a one-toone correspondence between the selection and the playindicating devices.

The number of bi-stable devices in each of the corresponding fields or pluralities will depend on the nature of the game, and may be as low as four or less and as high as 100 or more. For example, when the game of Keno is represented, each plurality may consist of 80 devices and the subset consists of 20 devices.

The machine-controlled means for selecting the subset of play-indicating devices may take any suitable form, e.g. it may select a series of numbers or a predetermined group of numbers from one or many available patterns, and it may be operable before or after the player makes his selection, provided that the machine gives no visible display of its selections until after the player has com pleted his selections. In the preferred embodiment to be described, however, the said means is a random selector which selects the devices of the subset at random and at equally spaced time intervals, the selection being initiated only after the player has initiated that action either by adopting a prior group of selections or by making the maximum number of selections available to him, or by operating a play switch after making a minimum number of selections.

The invention will be further described with reference to the accompanying drawings showing a specific embodiment of the game apparatus which simulates the game of Keno, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a pictorial view of the apparatus, showing the exterior appearance;

FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram showing a pair of selection and play-indicating devices, the random selection circuit and the timing circuit that causes the machinecontrolled selection of the play-indicating devices;

FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram showing the counters for the player selections and the hits and the comparison circuit for correlating the outputs of these counters; and

FIG. 4 is a schematic diagram showing the control system.

THE EXTERNAL PARTS Referring to FIG. 1, the machine is enclosed in a buttons. Among these is a start switch 3 (which may be a push-button switch or may be controlled by a key or remotely, etc.). The panel has a player instruction panel 4 which carries an erase push button switch 5 and a play push button switch 6 and four instruction signs embodied by windows 7, 8, 9 and which may be translucent material with printing thereon as shown and are provided with individually operable lamps (not shown). The window 7 is illuminated when the machine is ready to start a game and is extinguished when the start switch 3 is operated. Windows 8 and 9 show, respectively, that the switches 5 and 6 can be operated and denote that the player can cancel or erase the prior selection or can initiate the machine-controlled selection or play. These two windows are illuminated upon operating the switch 3. The window 10 is illuminated when the switch 6 is operated or the maximum permissible selections are made, as will appear.

The panel further has a bank 11 of manually selectable switches, arranged in rows of ten, and individually identified by suitable indicia, such as numbers. Thus, 80 of these switches can be provided. Each switch has a translucent push button which is illuminated from the rear by an individual lamp when a selection is made and remains illuminated until the selections are cancelled. Each of these switches is a part of a corresponding bistable selection device which will be described and which controls the corresponding lamp. Panel 2 also has a panel for showing the machine-controlled selection of playindicating devices, whihc in this embodiment is a translucent panel 12 separate from the bank .11. The panel 12 has indicia corresponding to those on the bank 11 denoting individual devices, each indicia having an individual lamp controlled by the bi-stable play-indicating device, as will appear. Twenty of these play-indicating devices are operated, preferably in succession, when the lay switch 6 is operated, and remain illuminated at least until completion of the game, e.g., until the start button 3 is operated for the succeeding game.

The panel further has an instruction panel 13 carrying printed instructions describing the game and two windows 14 and 15, e.g., made of translucent material such as ground glass and provided with rear projection devices (not shown) for projecting the progress. The window 14 indicates the number of play selections (corresponding to the number of buttons illuminated on the bank 11) and the window 15 the number of matched devices or hits. These projection devices are controlled by counters, as will appear.

The panel further optionally has a game-over switch 16, which may be provided with a key to be operated only by an attendant, to reset the game apparatus by its control system to the ready condition. This permits the apparatus to return from its last stage to the ready state after a winning condition has occurred. Also optionally, the panel may carry a display panel 17 showing approximately the odds against obtaining specified numbers of hits for any of a given number of selections, or a set of numbers showing the number of units awarded on the basis of a unit paid and an arbitrarily selected combination of numbers selected and hits. The latter is illustrated. Thus, in this embodiment the player is permitted to make from 4 through 10 selections, and at least two hits (available only when only four selections were made) are indicated as giving a win condition. This panel corresponds to the circuits to be described in connection with FIG. 3.

The several switches are all spring-returned, the switches 3 and 16 being normally closed (see FIG. 4) and the switches 5 and 6 and those of the bank 11 being normally open. However, other types of switches can be used, depending on the circuitry employed.

GENERAL MACHINE OPERATION Operation of the start switch 3 extinguishes the lamp of window 7 and the lamps of the bank 12 (resetting all play-indicating devices to their first conditions), resets the projection device of the hit window 15 to zero, and illuminates the erase and play windows 7 and '8; the push buttons of the bank 11 remain illuminated. In this stage, the player has the option of playing the numbers selected in the previous game (by operating the play switch 6) or cancelling them (by operating the erase switch 5).

If the erase switch 5 is operated, all of the selection devices are reset to their first conditions and all of the lamps behind the buttons of the bank 11 as well as that behind the window 9 is extinguished and the projection device of window 14 is reset to zero. The player must then select any permissible number of selection devices he wishes to play by depressing the buttons of the bank 11 sequentially. After each number is selected, it is counted and the count is indicated by the projection 14. Also, the corresponding selection devices are placed in their second conditions. At the minimum permissible number (four in this embodiment) the play window 9 is illuminated, telling the player that he can now start the game by pushing the play switch 6; however, he may continue selecting numbers on the bank 11 and initiate the machines selection of numbers after any selection he wishes. If he selects the maximum allowable numbers (ten in this embodiment) the game starts automatically. At any time during the players selection, he may erase all of the numbers previously selected unless he has selected the maximum number allowed. For this reason, the lamp behind the erase :window 8 is not turned off at this time.

Once the game starts, Whether by depressing the play switch 6 or automatically, the lamps of windows 8 and 9 are extinguished and that of window 10 is illuminated (several lamps in parallel behind the window 10 being usually provided); further, the machine will select numbers at random at suitable intervals from the 80 available numbers, thereby changing the corresponding play-indicating devices to their second conditions and illuminating the corresponding lamps on the panel 12. When these numbers are selected at one-half second intervals, it takes about 10 seconds for all 20 numbers to appear. Any hit (coincidence between the numbers selected by the player and by the machine) advances the projection device behind the window 15, whereby the total number of hits is displayed visually.

When the relation of the number of selections to the number of hits, i.e. the relation between the numbers displayed by the windows 14 and 15, is such as to lead to a win condition (as, for example, given by the table on the panel 17 the machine will stop until reset by operation of the game-over switch 16. Upon operation of the switch 16 or termination of the game with a no-win condition, the machine returns to its initial or ready state even without operation of the switch 16. In either case, the lamp behind the window 10 is extinguished and the window 7 is illuminated.

THE BI-STABL-E DEVICES Referring to FIG. 2, there is shown one of the pairs of bi-stable selection and play-indicating devices. There are as many pairs as number in the bank 11, viz, 80 in this embodiment. Each pair includes a selection device 201 and a play-indicating device 202, which may be flip-flop logic units of any suitable type, such as silicon-controlled rectifiers or units containing two or more transistors. Being well known per se, they are indicated only by block diagram having a set and a reset input (marked S and R, respectively) and an output marked HI. When the input R is energized the unit is reset to the state shown (corresponding to the first condition), with a high voltage condition (e.g. +14 volts) at the output HI. This is herein called the HI condition. When the input S is energized while the unit is in its first condition, it transfers to the second condition, and the voltage at the output changes to a low-voltage condition (e.g., this output is grounded to bring it to approximately zero volts), herein called the LO condition.

Each selection unit 201 has its S input connected by a I connected to a reset circuit 206 which is common to all 80 units (and will be further shown in FIG. 4).

Each play-indicating unit 202 has its S input connected by a circuit 207 to a corresponding AND gate and its R input connected to a reset circuit 208 which is common to all 80 units (and will be further shown in FIG. 4).

The output of each unit 201 is connected to a corre sponding lamp 209 which is further connected to a source of positive potential by a circuit 210, this lamp being shunted by a resistor 211 so that the information from the output will be available even though the lamp 209 is burned out. Each lamp 209 is situated behind a corresponding push button on the bank 11. Similarly, the output of each unit 202 is connected to a corresponding lamp 212 further connected to a positive potential source by a circuit 213 and shunted by a resistor 214. The lamps 212 are situated behind corresponding positions of the panel 12. When any unit 201 or 202 is in its first condition a high voltage is applied to both sides of the corresponding lamps; when either changes to its second condition, the output is at a low voltage and its lamp is energized.

A capacitor 215 and resistor 216, or a capacitor 217 and resistor 218, are connected between the output of the unit 201 or 202, respectively, and ground, and a diode 219 or 220 is connected to the junction of the capacitor and resistor and to an output circuit 221 or 222. The circuit 221 is common to all selection units and is connected to a selection counter to be described with FIG. 3. When the unit 201 is in its first condition, the capacitor is charged. When this unit is switched from its first to its second condition, its ouput changes from a HI to a LO condition; the capacitor 215 then discharges through the resistor 216, procducing a negative pulse at the cathode of the diode 219 and a corresponding pulse in the circuit 221. The circuit 222 is common to all 80 play-indicating units and is connected to a play-indicating counter to be described with FIG. 4. When the unit 202 is switched from its first to its second conditions, a negative pulse appears in the circuit 222 as explained for the unit 201.

The outputs of the units 201 and 202 are further interconnected by a resistor 223 in series with a capacitor 224, and a diode 225 is connected between the junction of these circuit elements and an output circuit 226 which is common to all 80 parts of units and is connected to a hit counter, to be described with FIG. 3. Prior to any selection by the player or by the machine, both outputs are HI and the cathode of the diode is at high voltage, and there is no voltage across the capacitor 224. If the unit 201 is selected by operation of its switch 204, its output is changed to L0 and the capacitor 224 charges through the resistor 223 without, however, producing any appreciable pulse in the circuit 226. Similarly, if the unit 202 is select ed by the machine without prior selection of the unit 201, the output of the former unit changes to L0, momentarily lowering the voltage at the cathode of the diode 225 but not sufficiently to produce a pulse in the circuit 226. However, if the unit 202 is operated after the unit 201 was operated, then capacitor 224 discharges through the resistor 223, applying a strong negative pulse to the cathode and producing a negative pulse in the circuit 226.

MACHINE-CONTROLLED SELECTION OF PLAY- INDICATING DEVICES Referring still to FIG. 2, the block diagram within the dotted line 301 is one of several possible circuits for generating random pulses which are fed into ring counters, one for the columns (units positions) and the other for the rows (tens positions). The coincidence of the row and column yields a unique number which is selected by the machine.

In the embodiment shown, the pulse generator includes a noise generator 302, such as a circuit including a Zener diode, which is connected to the input of an amplifier 304 which clips the spikes of the signal. The amplified output is fed to the input of a squaring device 304, such as a Schmitt trigger. The output of the device 304 may, for example, be a series of square waves with a frequency of 0.1 to 1.0 mHz.i4O kHz. (0.1 to 1.0 megacycles per second with a variation of 40 kilocycles per second). This output is supplied to the trigger input of a flip-flop 370 of which one output side is connected to an AND gate 305 and the other side to an AND gate 306. The wave forms are shown in the circles 307 and 308. It should be noted that one of several possible forms of pulse generators is described; the Schmitt trigger can be replaced by a mono-stable multivibrator supplied by the output from an amplitude detector which replaces the amplifier 303, to produce a series of square waves occurring at less uniform intervals. Further, a separate series of units 302-304 can be provided to drive each of the gates 305 and 306 directly; the flip-flop unit 370 is then unnecessary.

A time-signal generator is shown within the dotted line 309 having a control circuit 310 which is normally in a LO logic level, but is switched to a HI logic level (positive voltage) to start the generation of time signals. The generator includes a diode 311 connected between the circuit 310 and the junction of a grounded capacitor 312 and a resistor 313 and further to the emitter 314 of a unijunction transistor 315. This transistor may, for example, be a type 2N2060 or 2N2646. Base 1 of this transistor is grounded and base 2 is connected via a resistor 316 to the resistor 313 and to a circuit 317 which is maintained at a positive voltage V. When the circuit 310 is switched to a HI level, the capacitor 312 starts charging toward the positive voltage V through the resistor 313, thus forming an RC exponential timing network. The diode 311 prevents the input circuit 310 from shunting the resistor 313. When the emitter 314 attains a sufi'lcient voltage, equal to the peak point voltage of the unijunction transistor, the transistor turns on, allowing current flow through the resistor 316 and discharging the capacitor 312. When the capacitor has been discharged, the transistor again turns off. This causes a voltage variation across the unijunction transistor, which is transmitted by a circuit 318 to the input S of a monostable multivibrator 319. In its normal condition, this multivibrator has a high-level and a low-level output, indicated respectively at HI and L and connected respectively to circuits 320 and 321. The time generator operates the multivibrator typically at 0.5 second intervals, and the multivibrator remains operated, with the output conditions reversed, for periods of approximately micro-seconds. In other words, every half second the circuit 321 is at a HI logic level for approximately 25 micro-seconds, during which period the circuit 320 is at a LO level. The circuit 320 is further connected to the input of each AND gate 305 and 306.

There are two ring counters, the first including the four flip-flop units 322-325, and the other three flip-flop units 326-328. The first unit 322 has its trigger input T connected by a circuit 39 to the output of the AND gate 305, and the first unit 326 is similarly connected to the output of the AND gate 306 by a circuit 330. Each flipflop unit has HI and a LO output, which are at high and low voltage levels when the unit is in its normal condition but are reversed as to levels when the unit is switched. The trigger input T of each unit operates the unit when changed to a LO level after having been at a HI level. Each unit further has a set input S (not used in the circuit shown) and a reset input R. The latter, differing from other R inputs, resets the unit to its normal condition when the R input is switched from a HI to L0 level.

In the first ring counter, the LO output of unit 322 is connected by a circuit 331 to one input of an AND gate 332, the other input of which is connected by a circuit 333 to the HI output of the unit 325, so that the trigger input of the unit 323 is brought to a HI level via a circuit 334 when both the unit 325 is normal and the unit 322 is operated. The L0 output of unit 322 is further connected by a circuit 335 to one input of an AND gate 336 the other input of which is connected by a circuit 337 to the LO output of the unit 325, so that the reset input R of the latter unit is brought to a HI level via a circuit 338 when both that unit and the unit 322 are operated. The L0 outputs of units 323 and 324- are connected to the trigger inputs of the next unit by circuits 339 and 364. When all units 322-325 are normal, all have output levels as shown, representing the number 1. Every time that the circuit 329 is changed from a HI to a LO condition the counter will add one number and, after reaching the number 10, will return to the starting condition.

In the second ring counter, the LO outputs of the units 326 and 327 are connected by circuits 340 and 341, respectively, to the trigger inputs of the next unit, so that the counter makes 8 counts, from zero through 7 and repeats the cycle, advancing each time the circuit 330 is changed from a HI to a LO condition.

AND gates 342-351 decode the count information, which is present in binary form in the units 322-325, into decimal form. Thus, the gates 342, 343, 350 and 351 have five inputs and the others four inputs, connected by circuits generally designated at 352 to the outputs of the flip-flop units and to the circuit 321. Each gate emits a voltage corresponding to a HI condition only when all of its inputs are at a HI level. Thus, the gate 342 represents the decimal number 1 of the units position of the number to be selected, the gate 343 the decimal number 2, etc., and the last gate 351 represents the decimal number 10. One input of each gate is connected to circuit 321.

Similarly, AND gates 353-360 decode into decimal form the count information from the units 326-328, each having four inputs and being connected to the outputs of the flip-flop units and to the circuit 321 by circuits generally designated at 361. Thus, the gate 353 represents the decimal number 0 in the tens position of the number to be selected, the gate 354 the number 1, etc., and the last gate 360 represents the decimal number 7. One input of each gate is connected to the circuit 321.

An -number matrix, shown within the dotted line 362, includes 80 AND gates 363 which are connected in an X-Y system with the outputs of the AND gates 342- 351 and 353-360 in which coincidence of a row and a column at a HI level must occur to produce a HI logic output on any one of these AND gates 363. Each of these gates has two inputs, of which one is connected by a circuit to one of the gates 342-351 and the other to one of the gates 353-360, as shown in the drawing. For example, when the gates 351 and 360 are at a HI output, the gate 363 bearing the number 80 is at a HI output. Each of the 80 gates 363 has a separate output circuit, such as the circuit 207, connected to a corresponding bi-stable play indicating device.

In operation, when the units 302-304, 309 and 370 are energized (by circuits not shown) and the circuit 310 is brought to a HI condition, the square pulses from the AND gates 305 and 306 are counted in the first and second ring counter. -It may be noted that only one of the gates 305 and 306 transmits a pulse at any one time, depending on the condition of the flip-flop unit 370. These counters recycle completely every tenth and every eighth count, respectively, and their counting rates are not uniform due to variations in the frequency of the square pulses, as was noted above. When, every half second, the multivibrator 319 is operated, the circuit 320 is switched to a LO level and both gates 305 and 306 stop transmitting pulses for a short period, such as 25 micro-seconds. During this period, the circuit 321 is at a HI level. This permits .one of the gates 342-351 and one of the gates 353-360 (as determined by the binary counts in the counters) to switch its output to a HI condition and cause one of the AND gates 363 to switch its output to a HI condition. This will trigger one of the flip-flop logic units 202, changing it from its first to its second condition.

It should be observed that because only one of the gates 305 and 306 transmits a pulse at a time, either unit 322 or unit 336 is triggered. Hence either the row or the column is held constant while the other is changed, and all 80 numbers in the matrix can be generated. Further, randomness is achieved by having the frequency of the pulses from the squaring unit 304 many times that of the frequency of operation of the multivibrator 319; this randomness is enhanced by the variation in the frequency of the pulses. Randomness can also be achieved in ways, as by making the sampling rate, i.e. the frequency of the output of the timing circuit 309, variable.

SELECTION-COUNTING AND HIT-COUNTING SYSTEMS AND SENSING MATRIX Referring to FIG. 3, the circuit within the dotted line 401 is a logic diagram of the selection counter, also called the Play Counter. It counts the number of switches of the bank 11 the player has pushed in selecting his numbers (or the number of switches which were pushed in a previous game and not cancelled by the erase switch 5). It includes four flip-flop units 402-406, inter-connected to form a binary counter. The trigger input of the unit 402 is connected to the circuit 221 (see also FIG. 2) and the trigger inputs of the other three units are connected by circuits 404-407 to the LO outputs of the preceding units. The reset inputs R of all units are connected to a common reset circuit 206 (also shown in FIGS. 2 and 4). The binary information of these units is decoded into decimal form by AND gates 409-418, which have three or four inputs connected to the outputs of the flip-flop units by circuits generally designated at 419.

Thus, the gate 409 represents the decimal number 1 and the gates 410-418 represent, in sequence, the decimal numbers 2 through 10. Each of these gates is shown to have its output normally at a LO level; when a count is accumulated, one of these gates emits a HI level output through its individual output circuit 420. One or more of these, e.g., the six output circuits from the gates 412-417 (representing respectively four through nine selections) are connected by circuits 421 to an OR gate 422 having an output circuit 423. When the number of player selections is at any time in the range 4-9, the circuit 423 is at a HI logic level. Similarly, the output circuit 420 from the gate 418 is connected to a branch circuit 424, which is at a high level when the number of player selections is ten, which is the maximum number of player selection permitted in this embodiment. When the circuit 424 is energized, the machine-controlled selection of playindicating devices begins, under control of the system to be described with FIG. 4, wherein the function of the circuit 423 of enabling operation of the play switch will also appear.

Each of the output circuits 420 is connected to the input of a corresponding, individual, single-input NAND gate 425-434, which are used as lamp drivers. Thus, the output of each is connected to a corresponding lamp 435 which is associated with a digit 436 of a projection indicator, shown diagramatically by the dotted line 437. This indicator is mounted to project the number in the window 14. One side of each of these lamps is connected to a common positive potential by a circuit 438. Without any selection devices in their second conditions, i.e. after switch 5 was operated and before any of the switches in the bank 11 are depressed, all AND gates 409 through 418 have LO logic level outputs. As each selection device is selected by the player, negative pulses on the circuit 221 causes the flip-flops 402-405 to count the number of selections, and the AND gates 409-418 will switch from a LO logic level to a HI logic level in sequence, which will turn the NAND gates 425-434 to a LO logic level, allowing current to form from the circuit 438 through the corresponding lamp and the NAND gate. Thereby, the lamps are illuminated in succession, and all are extinguished when a reset pulse is applied to the reset circuit 206.

The circuit within the dotted line 439 shows the logic diagram of the hit-counting system. It includes four flipflop units 440-443 connected to form a binary counter, which counts the number of hits. These hits produce negative pulses in the circuit 226 (see FIG. 2) which is connected to the trigger input of the unit 440. The trigger inputs of the other three units are connected by circuits 444-446 to the LO outputs of the preceding units, and the reset inputs R of all units are connected to a common reset circuit 208 (also shown in FIGS. 2 and 4). The binary information of these units is decoded into decimal form by eleven AND gates 447-457, which have three or four inputs connected to the outputs of the flip-flop units by circuits generally designated at 458.

Thus, the AND gate 447 represents the number 0" (no hits), and gate 448 the number 1 (one hit), and the gates 449-457 represent, in sequence, the decimal numbers 2 through 10. Each of the gates has its output normally at a LO level, although at any instant one one of them will have all of its inputs HI and, hence, its output at a HI level. The output from the zero gate 447 is connected at circuit 459, and the outputs from the gates 448-457 are connected by individual circuits 460 to corresponding NAND gates 461-470. These NAND gates are used as lamp drivers, each one having its output connected to a corresponding lamp 471 which is further connected to a common circuit 472 maintained at a positive potential. These lamps are associated with corresponding digits 473 of a projection indicator, shown diagramatically by the dotted line 474. This indicator is mounted to project the number in the window 15, and the lamps are energized as explained above for the projection indicator 437. The AND gate 447, when in :1 HI output state, indicates 0 hits, but this is not indicated in the projection device 474 or window 15. The lamps 471 are illuminated in succession as the gates 448-457 are switched, and all are extinguished when a reset pulse is applied to the reset circuit 208.

The twenty-one output circuits 420, 459 and 460 are connected to a sensing matrix enclosed within the dotted line 475. This matrix includes an AND gate 476 for every valid combination of the number of player selections and hits according to the rules of the game shown within the chained line 477. There may be, in addition, a series of AND gates 478 for no hits, and a series of AND gates 479 for other combinations. Each of these gates has two inputs, one connected to a circuit 420 from the player selection counter and the other to a circuit 459 or 460 from the hit counter. The outputs from these AND gates are at a LO level unless both inputs are at a HI level; hence at most only one of these gates will have a HI output. The outputs from the gates 476 are connected by individual circuits 480 to a win control system, indicated diagramatically by the rectangle 481. Because the details of such win control systems are known per se and are not a part of this invention, they are not included in this specification. It may be noted, however, that this system may be constructed to perform any desired function.

For example, when the game apparatus is used for entertainment, each of the thirty output circuits 480 denoting a dilferent win condition can be connected by a circuit (including a NAND gate wired as described for the gates 425-434) showing a point score. Such a score can be computed from the different probabilities of the number of hits attained in relation to the number of de vices selected by the player, and can be analagous to the information given on the panel 17 (FIG. 1). It is also possible to connect the outputs from the gates 478 and/ or the gates 479 to the win device by circuits 482 and 483, respectively, to indicate additional outcomes, including the absence of hits; if deemed to be valid, the scores would, of course, be diffeernt from those shown in the panel 17. Fifty-five to sixty-five lights would then be used. It is evident that, in the embodiment described, it is not possible to start the game when any of the three gates 409-411 is in its HI condition, so that the uppermost nine gates 478 and 479 would be always inactive. However, when these gates are provided the circuits 321 would be connected also to the outputs from the gates 409-411 to make the uppermost nine gates inoperable.

On the other hand, if the apparatus were to issue tokens or the like, the win-control system 481 would be constructed to deliver a printed ticket showing the score or deliver tokens, indicating the number of free games accorded the player.

Finally, it is also possible that none of the gates in the matrix are used. In that variant, the attendant would award predetermined win prizes in accordance with the displays on the windows 14 and 15.

The win-control system 481 preferably includes a NOR gate 484 having an input for each of the circuits 480 and, if desired, each of the circuits 483) which denotes a winning condition. The output circuit 485 of this OR 1 I gate, further shown in FIG. 4, is at 9. HI level only when there is no winning condition.

THE GAME CONTROL SYSTEM AND PLAY-COUNTER Referring to FIG. 4, the operation of the game apparatus is controlled by a controller having a plurality of successive states, such as three or more. In the embodiment to be described, it has four states. As shown, the control system includes a four-position binary counter comprising two flip-flop units 501 and 502 and AND gates 503-506 which are connected to the outputs by circuits generally indicated at 507. The AND gate 503 has a BI output when the controller is in its first state, corresponding to the first stage of the game. Similarly, the HI output conditions of the gates 504, 505 and 506 correspond, respectively, to the second, third and fourth states of the controller and corresponding stages of the game. The trigger input of the unit 502 is connected to the LO output of the unit 501 by a circuit 508; and the reset input R of this unit is connected to a circuit 509. The set input S and the reset input R of the unit 501 are connected to the outputs or OR gates 510 and 511, respectively, these gates having two and three inputs, re-

spectively. As will appear, these inputs cause the binary window 7 to illuminate the ready sign whenever the circuit 512 is at a HI level and indicate that the machine is in condition to start a game by operating the switch 3. Further, this places one of the two inputs to an AND gate 516 at a HI level. The other input of this gate is connected by a circuit 517 to the switch 3, which is normally closed and grounded. So long as this switch is closed, the second input to the gate is at a LO level. When the switch 3 is operated, the gate 516 switches to 21 HI level, and the positive voltage is transmitted by a circuit 518 to one of the inputs of the OR gate 510 to change A its output to a HI level; this, in turn, will set the flip-flop unit 501 and advance the controller to its second state. The gate 503 then switches to a LO output, extinguishing the lamp 514 and causing the gate 516 to switch to a LO output.

In the second state, the gate 504 has a HI output. Energization of the gates output circuit 519 has several functions:

(a) It enables operation of the erase switch 5 by raising one of the inputs to an AND gate 520 to a HI level. The

other input to this gate is connected to the output of an inverting NAND gate 521, the input of which is connected by a circuit 522 to one side of the switch 5, the other side of which is grounded. The circuit 522 is inherently in a HI state, and closing the switch 5 places it into a LO state to switch the gate 520. In certain constructions of the gate 521, the circuit 522 may be made positive by connecting it to a source 523 of positive potential through a resistor 524.

(b) It controls the operation of the play function, enabling the play switch 6 to be operated. This play switch is connected between ground and the input of an inverting NAND gate 525 which input may, as described above, in certain circuits be further connected through. a resistor 526 to a constant positive potential 527. The output of gate 525 is connected by a circuit 528 to one of the three inputs of an AND gate 529, the output of which is con nected by a circuit 530 to one of the inputs to the OR gate 511. A second input of the AND gate 52) is brought to a HI level from the circuit 423 when at least the I 2 minimum number (four in this embodiment) of selections has been made. The third input to the AND gate is brought to a HI level from the circuit 519 via a branch circuit 531. It is evident that the circuit 530 can be brought to a HI level by operation of the play switch 6 only when the control system is in its second state.

(c) Lamps 532 and 533, which are situated behind the windows 8 and 9, respectively, are turned on. The former is effected through an inverting NAND gate 534 which normally has its output circuit 535 at a HI level, the lafnp 532 being connected between the circuit 535 and a source of positive voltage 536. The latter is effected through an inverting, twoinput NAND gate 537, the output circuit 538 of which is normally at a HI level and is connected to the lamp 533, which is further connected to a source 539 of positive potential. The other input of the gate 537 is connected to the circuit 423, and the output circuit 538 is at a low level only when both gate inputs are at a 1-H level. Hence, the play light 533 is illuminated when both circuits 423 and 519 are at the HI level. It should be noted that the circuit 423 is at a HI level before the erase switch 5 is operated, so that the play light 533 is on and the play switch 6 operative; however, when the erase switch 5 is operated, the previous selections are cancelled (as will appear), and the circuit 423 is at a LO level until the minimum number of selections have been made, when it will again be at a HI level.

((1) The previous machine-controlled selections are cancelled by bringing the circuit 208 to a HI level. This resets the several flip-flop logic units 202 and extinguishes the lights 212 behind the panel 12; this is effected through an inverting NAND gate 540, the output of which is connected to circuit 208 and switches to a HI level when the circuit 535 assumes a LO level.

(e) The play counter (to be described), including flipfiop units 541-545, is reset by a common reset circuit 546, which is connected to each of the reset inputs R and the circuit 208.

(f) The hit counter (flip-flop units 440-443) is reset and the hit lights 471 are extinguished through the circuit 208. Hence, the projection indicator of window 15 will show a blank.

The game can also be started by an AND gate 547 having its three inputs connected to the circuit 531, to a circuit 548, and to the circuit 424. Circuit 548 is at a HI level only after erase switch 5 is operated. When all three inputs are HI the output circuit 549 to an input of the OR gate 511 is HI.

When the erase switch 5 is operated, the output circuit 550 of the NAND gate 521 and the other input to the AND gate 520 are brought to a HI level, thereby raising the circuit 551 to HI. This triggers a mono-stable multivibrator 552. The circuit 206, connected to the LO output of the multivibrator, is normally at a LO level, and when the multivibrator is switched, a short HI level pulse is applied to this circuit, thereby resetting the several selection devices and extinguishing the lamps 209 behind the bank of push buttons 11. This also resets the selection counter 402-405, thereby extinguishing the lamps 435 and resetting the projection device of window 14 to blank. Hence, the player thereafter has no selections counted.

It may be noted that if the player at any time during his selection of selection devices (but before the start of the game) operates the erase switch 5, all numbers previously selected are erased and he must make new selections.

The circuit 551 is also connected to the set input S of a flip-flop unit 553, the reset input R of which is connected by a circuit 554 to the circuit 535. Because this circuit was at a HI level in the first state of the control system, (the first stage of the game) the unit 553 is normally in reset condition; however, during the second state of the system, when the circuits 535 and 554 are placed in the LO level, the S input is operative to switch the unit from its normal condition shown, so that the LO output circuit 548 becomes HI and the circuit 205, controlled thereby, energizes the several switches 204 to permit selections to be made among any of the 80 available devices. The circuit 205 can be connected to the circuit 548 directly; however, it is desirable to prevent the simultaneous operation of two or more switches 204 of the bank 11. To this end, the LO output of the unit 553 is connected to the cathode of a diode 555, the anode of which is connected to the circuit 205, to a grounded capacitor 556, and to a source 557 of positive voltage through a large resistor 558. The circuit 205 is thereby at a HI level only when the output is switched to high and no current flows through the diode, so that the capacitor 556 is charged. This charge is, however, only sufficient to operate one of the selection devices; when any switch 204 is operated the capacitor 556 discharges in a few microseconds, permitting only one switch to be effective until the capacitor is recharged, typically one millisecond later. When the circuit 548 is at 21 HI level, it permits the AND gate 547 to switch. Hence, when the player has selected the maximum number of devices permitted, viz, ten, a shift of the circuit 424 to a HI level starts the game.

When the game is started, either by operation of the play switch -6 or automatically by a HI condition in the circuit 424, the circuit 530 or 549 is brought to a HI level and the OR gate 511 resets the unit 501. This switches the unit 502 via the circuit 508 and moves the controller to its third state. Its only output gate now switched to a HI output is the gate 505. This initiates the machine-controlled selection of play-indicating bi-stable devices by bringing the circuit 310 to a -HI level. The selections are made as previously described, and each selection produces a negative pulse in the circuit 222, which is connected to the trigger input of the first flip-flop unit 541 of the play counter. Each succeeding flip-flop unit has its trigger input connected to the LO output of the preceding unit by a circuit 559, 560, 561, or 562. The outputs of this play counter are connected as shown by circuits indicated generally at 563 to an AND gate 564 in a manner that the output circuit 565 of this gate assumes a HI level when the decimal count of 20 has been accumulated in binary form.

The output of the gate 505 is further connected by a circuit 566 to the input of an inverting NAND gate 567, which switches its output circuit 568 to a LO level when the circuit 566 is HI. This illuminates a lamp 569 Which is further connected to a source 570 of positive potential and is situated behind the window 10 to indicate that the game is on.

An AND gate 571 has one of its inputs connected via a circuit 572 to the output of the gate 505 and the other input by the circuit 565 to the output of the gate 564. When the binary count accumulated in the counter 541- 545 reaches both inputs to the gate 571 are at a HI level; hence, the output circuit 573, which is connected to an input of the OR gate 510, is switched to HI. This sets the control system to its fourth state, and the AND gate 506 is the only controller gate at a HI level.

During the fourth stage of the game, the machine-controlled selection of play-indicating devices ceases because the output circuit 310 is at a LO level; however, the count accumulated in the counters 541545 remains. The output circuit 574 places one of the inputs to an AND gate 575 at a HI level. The other input to this gate is connected to the circuit 485 (FIG. 3), which is at a HI level only when there is no winning condition. In this situation the output circuit 576 of the AND gate, which is connected to the set input S of a monostable multivibrator 577, triggers the latter to place the circuit 578 in a HI level for a short period. This constant-width pulse is applied simultaneously to the circuit 509 to reset the unit 502 and to an input of the OR gate 511 to reset the unit 501. The control system is thereby returned to its first state.

However, if a win condition occurs, the circuit 485 is at a LO level. The control system then remains in its fourth state until advanced by the player or by an attendant. For example, this can be efiected by operating the reset or game-over switch 16, which is connected in series with the circuit 485 and is normally closed. Momentarily opening the switch permits the second input to AND gate 575 to assume a HI level (from the internal circuitry of this gate), thus allowing the circuit 576 to trigger the multivibrator 577 to advance controller to the first state as described above.

It will be understood that a smaller or a greater number of successive states may be used in the control system. Thus, the first state can be combined with the fourth state, or the second state can be subdivided into two states, etc.

I claim:

1. A game apparatus comprising:

a plurality of bi-stable selection devices each having first and second conditions, said devices being individually manually operable to change them from their first to second conditions,

a plurality of corresponding play-indicating bi-stable devices each having first and second conditions,

means functioning at the beginning of play to place all of said play-indicating devices in their first condition,

an electrical noise generator having a randomly varying output frequency and circuit means connected thereto and to said play-indicating devices and having electrical conditions changing in response to said generator frequency for changing a preselected number of such devices greater than one and less than all from their first to second condition sequentially and at random among all remaining unchanged playindicating devices, and

means sensing coincidence of corresponding selection and play-indicating devices being in their second conditions.

2. A game apparatus according to claim 1 which includes:

(a) a bank of manually operable switches correspond ing respectively to said selection devices, each switch being electrically connected to a corresponding selection device so as to change the device to its second condition,

(b) a manually operable play switch for initiating the change of conditions of said preselected number of the play-indicating devices,

(c) a control device having a plurality of sequential states and being operable to change from each state to the next, said device having circuit means for making the switches of said bank operable in at least one state and inoperative in another state, and circuit means for making said play switch operative in at least one state and inoperative in other states, and

((1) display panel means bearing said bank of switches and said play switch and an electric lamp for indicating when said play switch is operative, said lamp being connected by circuit means to said control device.

3. In combination with the game apparatus according to claim 2,

(a) a reset means for returning said play-indicating devices to their first conditions, said reset means being connected to said control device for control thereby,

(b) erase means including a manually operable switch on said display panel means for returning said selection devices to their first conditions, said control device having circuit means for making said erase switch inoperative during operation of said coincidence sensing means, and

(c) an electric lamp on said display panel means for indicating when said erase switch is operative, said lamp being connected by circuit means to said control device.

4. Game apparatus acording to claim 1 wherein:

a said bi-stable devices are flip-flop logic units arranged in pairs, each pair including one selection unit and 15 one play-indicating unit, each selection unit having a manually controlled input circuit for changing the unit from the first to the second condition, and the said apparatus further comprises:

(b) means for normally disabling said manually controlled input circuit,

(c) a start circuit for resetting all play-indicating flipflop logic units to their first conditions and thereafter enabling said manually controlled circuit to permit changes in the conditions of the selection units,

(d) circuit means interconnecting the outputs of the flipflop logic units of each pair for emitting a signal Whenever a play-indicating flip-flop unit is changed to its second condition when and only when the corresponding selection flip-flop logic unit was in its second condition, and

(e) a hit counter connected to count the number of pairs of flip-flop logic units which are in their second conditions.

5. Game apparatus according to claim 4 wherein said 6. Game apparatus according to claim 4 which further comprises:

(a) a manually operable erase switch and a manually operable play switch, (b) an electrical circuit from the erase switch for resetting the selection flip-flop logic units to their first conditions upon operation of the switch,

(c) an electrical circuit from the play switch for initiating said signal generator change in the conditions of the play-indicating flip-flop logic units from their first to their second conditions,

(d) additional means for normally disabling said electrical circuits from the erase and play switches, and

(e) means controlled by said start circuit for enabling said circuits from the erase and play switches after resetting of said play-indicating logic units.

7. In combination with the game apparatus according to claim 6 additional circuit means for disabling said circuit from the play switch when the count in said selection counter is less than a predetermined value, said predetermined value being smaller than said preselected number.

8. Game apparatus according to claim 6 which includes further:

(a) second signal-emitting circuit means connected to each selection flip-flop logic unit for emitting a signal whenever the corresponding flip-flop logic unit is changed to the second condition thereof,

(b) a selection counter connected to said second signalemitting circuit means for counting the number of selection flip-flop logic units changed to the second state and (c) circuit means responsive to a predetermined count in said selection counter for initiating said signal generator change of conditions of the play-indicating flip-flop logic units.

9. Game apparatus according to claim 8 eludes further:

(a) third signal-emitting means connected to each playindicating flip-flop logic unit for emitting a signal whenever the corresponding flip-flop logic unit is changed to the second condition thereof,

(b) a play counter connected to said third signal-emitting circuit means for counting the number of playindicating flip-flop logic units in their second conditions, and

(0) means for terminating the signal generator change of play-indicating flip-flop logic units when the play counter reaches said preselected number.

10. Game apparatus according to claim 1 having a control system which comprises:

(a) a control device having four sequential states and which in- 16 being operable to change from each state to the next and from the last to the first upon receiving input signals, said device being normally in its first state,

(b) a first control circuit energized by said control device when in its first state and including manually controlled switch means for advancing the control device to its second state,

(c) a second control circuit energized by said control device when in its second state,

((1) a play switch connected to said second control circuit and to the control device for advancing said control device from the second to the third state upon the concurrence of energization of the second control circuit and operation of the play switch,

(e) a manually operable erase switch connected to said second control circuit and to said selection devices for resetting said devices to their first conditions when the second control circuit is energized,

(f) a play counter connected to said play-indicating devices by circuit means for counting the number of said devices in the second conditions thereof, said counter and devices having input means for resetting the counter and returning said devices to their first conditions, both said input means being connected by circuit means to said second control circuit to effect resetting of the counter and devices when the second control circuit is energized,

(g) a third control circuit energized by said control device when in its third state,

(h) circuit means connecting the output of said play counter and said third control circuit advancing said control device from the third to the fourth state upon the concurrence of energization of the third control circuit and the accumulation on the play counter of a predetermined value smaller than the total number of play-indicating devices,

(i) a fourth control circuit energized by said control device when in its fourth state,

(j) a hit counter connected to count the number of corrcspondences of the selection and play-indicating devices in the second conditions thereof having a win output circuit indicating a win condition,

(k) a game-over switch, and

(l) circuit means connected to said fourth control circuit returning said control device to its first state when the fourth control circuit is energized and either (1) said win circuit does not indicate a predetermined win condition or (2) said game-over switch is operated.

11. Game apparatus acording to claim 1 wherein said random signal generator comprises:

a switching circuit having a plurality of electrical states each representing one of said play-indicating devices and having means sequentially disposing said circuit in one of its states selected at random,

means responsive to' said switching circuit changing the play-indicating device corresponding to the state of said circuit to its second condition,

a play counter connected for counting the number of play-indicating devices in their second conditions, and

means for terminating the changing of play-indicating devices to their second conditions when the play counter reaches said preselected number.

12. In combination with the game apparatus according to claim 1, first signal-emitting means for emitting a signal each time a selection device is changed from the first to the second condition thereof, a selection counter con nected to said first signal-emitting means to count the number of selection devices changed to the second conditions, second signal-emitting means for emitting a signal upon each correspondence of a selection device and a play-indicating device in the second conditions, a hit counter connected to said second signal-emitting means, and a matrix of sensors connected to said selection counter and hit counter and providing a plurality of unique signals corresponding to and identifying the plurality of combinations of counts accumulated in said counters and affording a winning value determination of each game play.

13. A game apparatus which comprises:

a first plurality of bi-stable selection devices each having a first and a second condition, said devices being individually manually operable to change them from first to second conditions,

a second plurality of corresponding play-indicating bistable devices each having a first and a second condition,

machine-controlled means for changing the conditions of a subset of the play-indicating devices from the first to the second conditions thereof,

means for sensing the conditions of said play-indicating devices to provide an indication of the correspondences of the selection and play-sensing devices which are in the second condition,

signal-emitting means for emitting a signal each time a selection device is changed from the first to the second condition thereof,

a selection counter connected to said signal-emitting means to count the number of selection devices changed to the second conditions, and

means responsive to a predetermined value of the count in said selection counter for initiating said machinecontrolled change of conditions of a subset of the play-indicating devices.

14. In combination with the game apparatus according to claim 13, manually operable means for initiating said machine-controlled change of conditions of a subset of the play-indicating devices, and means for inhibiting said manually operable means when less than a predetermined number of selection devices are in their second conditions, said predetermined number being smaller than said predetermined value.

15. In combination with the game apparatus according to claim 14, manually operable erase means for resetting all of said selection devices to their first conditions, said manually operable means for initiating machine-controlled change being operable both before and after operation of said erase means.

16. In combination with the game apparatus according to claim 15, a start switch and a circuit connected thereto for resetting all of said play-indicating devices to their first conditions, and control circuit means for disabling said manually operable means for initiating the machinecontrolled change until operation of the said start switch.

17. A game apparatus comprising:

player operable means having selective electrical conditions,

an electrical noise generator having a randomly varying output frequency,

circuit means connected to said generator and having electrical conditions changing in response to said generator frequency, and

means sensing preselected correspondence between the conditions of said player means and circuit means.

18. A game apparatus as defined in claim 17, said circuit means comprising:

a ring-counter having an input connected to said noise generator and an output providing said electrical conditions,

a time-signal generator issuing a control signal having a frequency substantially less than the frequency range of said noise generator, and

means connecting said time-signal generator to said counter interrupting advancement thereof at intervals determined by said control signal for registering the instantaneous conditions of said counter with said sensing means.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS ANTON O. OECHSLE, Primary Examiner

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Classifications
U.S. Classification463/18
International ClassificationG07C15/00, A63F3/06
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/0645, G07C15/006
European ClassificationA63F3/06E, G07C15/00E
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 19, 1999ASAssignment
Owner name: ELECTROLUX CORPORATION, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: RELEASE OF SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:BANCBOSTON INVESTMENTS, INC.;WELLS FARGO & CO.;FIRST BOSTON MEZZANINE INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIP - 9;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:009773/0310
Effective date: 19980831
Nov 6, 1998ASAssignment
Owner name: EL ACQUISITION CORPORATION, N/K/A ELECTROLUX CORP.
Free format text: RELEASE OF SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BANKBOSTON NA;REEL/FRAME:009580/0655
Effective date: 19980831
Jan 5, 1990ASAssignment
Owner name: BANCBOSTON INVESTMENTS INC.
Owner name: FIRST BOSTON MEZZANINE INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIP - 9
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ELECTROLUX CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:005206/0691
Effective date: 19891024
Owner name: FIRST BOSTON SECURITIES CORP.
Owner name: WELLS FARGO & CO.
Owner name: WESRAY CAPITAL CORPORATION
Nov 7, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: BANCBOSTON INVESTMENTS INC.,
Owner name: FIRST BOSTON MEZZANINE INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIP - 9
Owner name: FIRST BOSTON SECURITIES CORP.
Owner name: WELLS FARGO & CO.
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ELECTROLUX CORPORATION A CORP. OF DE.;REEL/FRAME:005195/0287
Effective date: 19891024
Owner name: WESRAY CAPITAL CORPORATION
Jun 9, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF BOSTON, THE
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:EL ACQUISITION CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004923/0862
Effective date: 19871030