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Publication numberUS3534882 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 20, 1970
Filing dateMar 25, 1969
Priority dateMar 25, 1969
Publication numberUS 3534882 A, US 3534882A, US-A-3534882, US3534882 A, US3534882A
InventorsJames H Botsford
Original AssigneeBethlehem Steel Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Quiet metal can
US 3534882 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 20, 1970 J, H. BOTSFORD 3,534,882

QUIET METAL CAN Filed March 25, 1969 l NV E N TOR F (5 James bf Bo/sfora United States Patent 01 3,534,882 Patented Oct. 20, 1970 3,534,882 QUIET METAL CAN James H. Botsford, Bethlehem, Pa., assignor to Bethlehem Steel Corporation, a corporation of Delaware Continuation-impart of application Ser. No. 688,094, Dec. 5, 1967. This application Mar. 25, 1969, Ser. No. 814,516

Int. Cl. B65d 25/00 US. Cl. 220-1 22 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Vibration, and resulting noise, generated by a metal garbage can is effectively reduced with sandwich of felt between vibration-prone portions of can and metal member. Straps of felt and metal are mounted around can body, around flange of lid, across lid offset from lid center, and across bottom offset from botton center. Discs of felt and metal may be mounted to center of can bottom. Resilient feet are mounted around bottom flange of can body. Handles frictionally engage stirrups to prevent rattling.

CROSS-REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATIONS This application is a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 688,094, now abondoned filed Dec. 5, 1967.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates broadly to means for reducing noise generated by cans and lids during the handling thereof. More specifically, this invention relates to the application of vibration-damping mechanism to various surfaces of a can and lid to reduce noise.

The clang and rattle of the lowly garbage can has with some justification been compared to the sound of a struck gong or the clash of cymbals. In a large city, the tintinnabulation of hundreds of thousands, indeed millions, of garbage cans and lids being brought into violent contact wtih each other and with concrete pavement, when lv ingly handled with the well-known consideration of the garbage crew for the slumbering householder in the still of the night, can have a devastating effect on the peace and quiet, if not sanity, of the community. Despite the evident need for a rugged and truly quiet garbage can, the prior art simply has offered no solution to this problem. It is true that plastic garbage cans and lids are available, and that they are quieter than the traditional galvanized steel cans. However, plastic garbage cans and lids are quite expensive, will not stand up under rough handling, and are particularly susceptible to breakage in cold weather.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION One of the objects of this invention is to provide an improved metal can and lid therefor.

Another of the objects of this invention is to provide a metallic garbage can and lid therefor which will generate substantially less noise in handling than conventional metallic garbage cans.

Yet another object of this invention is to provide a metallic garbage can and lid therefor which will generate a low level of noise in handling comparable to a plastic garbage can and lid, but which will be considerably more rugged under all conditions of use than the plastic garbage can and lid therefor.

Other and further objects of this invention will become apparent during the course of the following description and by reference to the accompanying drawings and the appended claims.

Is has been discovered that the foregoing objects can be attained by applying means to various portions of the can and lid to damp or absorb noise-producing vibrations. Specifically, a constrained layer treatment, discussed generally in Noise Reduction Manual by P. H. Geiger, 1953, at pages -96, is applied to specific areas of greatest vibration on the can body and on the lid.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 represents a view in elevation of the garbage can constituting the present invention, showing one form of lid therefor.

FIG. 2 represents a view in plan of the lid shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 represents an enlarged medial fragmented section in elevation of the garbage can.

FIG. 4 represents an upward view of the bottom of the garbage can of FIG. 1, showing one form of vibration damper applied to one form of can bottom.

FIG. 5 represents an enlarged vertical section of a portion of the can bottom shown in FIG. 4, taken along the line 5-5 of FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 represents a view in plan of another form of lid.

FIG. 7 represents an upward view of the bottom of a garbage can, showing another form of vibration damper applied to another form of can bottom.

FIG. 8 represents an enlarged vertical section of a portion of the can bottom shown in FIG. 7, taken along the line 8-2 of FIG. 7.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Garbage can 1 is seen as comprising body 2, having a bottom 3, and a lid 4 of metallic construction, e.g., galvanized steel.

The intensity of the vibrations in each of these parts varies considerably over the area thereof. For the sake of economy, it is desirable to apply the aforementioned constrained layer treatment primarily only to those areas where the intensity of vibrations is greatest. Such areas can be determined from a physical analysis of the modes of vibration of each part. This analysis may comprise placing the part to be analyzed near a loudspeaker con nected to a variable frequency oscillator, and varying the frequency until the lowest mechanical resonant frequency of the part is found. At this resonance, a noticeable increase in the volume of the sound occurs. The pattern of vibration of the part at this resonance may then be determined by moving a metal object, e.g., the blade of a screwdriver, over the surface of the part while exerting light pressure there against with said blade. As the blade is moved away from the nodes a chattering becomes audible, the intensity thereof reaching a maximum at the antinodes.

This procedure is then repeated for the three or four modes of vibration next higher in frequency to find the areas of maximum vibration intensity for these modes.

A constrained layer of vibration damping material is then applied to the part so as to cover these areas of higher intensity vibrations effectively. It is essential that said material be applied in such a manner that the basic pattern of vibration of the part is not disturbed; otherwise, the nodes and antinodes in the part will shift and the vibration damping treatment is likely to be ineffective. More complex modes having higher frequencies will automatically be damped by this placement.

The above-described vibration analysis is then repeated whereby the effectiveness of the constrained layer may be determined. By successive approximation, the optimum placement of the constrained layer can be determined.

The can body 2 shown in FIG. 1 was 24 inches high and was characterized by maximum vibrations approximately 9 inches below the top thereof. A belt of vibration damping material, having a width of about one inch, was therefore placed about said body so as to be circumferentially disposed about 9 inches below the top thereof. The belt 5 was maintained in position about the can body 2 by means of a metallic strap 6. Said strap 6 engaged substantially the entire outer circumferential surface of the belt 5, and cooperated with the body 2 to constrain the belt 5.

Strap 6 may be riveted or bolted to body 2 through the belt 5 or through holidays in the belt 5, or may be spot welled to body 2 through holidays in the belt 5, or may simply be formed as a closed hoop with ends lapped and secured to each other under such compression as to provide sufficient friction between belt 5, body 2 and strap 6 as to maintain the position of belt 5 and strap 6 relative to body 2. v

While all materials absorb vibrations to some extent, the term vibration damping material as used herein is meant to include only those materials having a decay rate of at least 1 db./sec., as measured by the standard Thick Plate Test. For example, asphalt saturated felts, especially those having indentations therein, are suitable for the belt 5. Armstrong Felt Specification No. 415, described in the Armstrong publication Felt and Fiber Products for the Industrial Designer, published December 1965, has a decay rate of 3.0 db./sec. and is ideally adapted for use as the belt 5.

By constraining the belt 5 with the strap 6, the decay rate can be increased from about 3.0 db./sec. to over 100 db./ sec.

One form of can bottom 3, as shown in FIG. 4, is conventially stamped to provide a number of concentric circular stiffening rings 7 and radial stiffening legs 8. Vibrations, and hence noise, generated by this form of bottom are greatest at the center thereof, and are damped and lessened by means of a constrained circular plate 9 of vibration damping material such as indented asphalt saturated felt. Said felt is fastened to the center of bottom 3, as by means of adhesive, with a constraining metallic circular plate 10 engaging substantially the entire outer surface of plate 9, as by means of adhesive, and cooperating with the bottom 3 to constrain the plate 9. In a specific example of practice, it has been found that, when circular plates 9 and 10 having a diameter of 6 inches are mounted to the center of a bottom 3 having a conventional diameter of inches, vibrations, and resulting noise, generated by the bottom 3, are most effectively reduced.

Conventionally, the bottom 3 of a garbage can is mounted to the body 2 some distance above the bottom of body 2, so that body 2 projects as a circular flange 11 below bottom 3. Typically, the flange 11 may project approximately inch below bottom 3. A number of feet 12, made of resilient material such as rubber, plastic or the like, are mounted in equispaced relation around flange 11, and are held thereto by frictional engagement, as shown in FIG. 3, although other means such as screws, rivets, adhesive, etc, may be employed. Feet 12 prevent the metallic flange 11 from striking concrete pavements and generating noise. In place of several feet 12 as shown, a continuous rubber or plastic lip extending around the circumference of flange 11 may be employed.

Handles 13 are mounted in stirrups 14 suitably secured to body 2. Means is provided to cause the handles 13 to bind in stirrups 14, thereby to eliminate the rattling generated by loose handles. In FIG. 3, a piece 15 of resilient material, such as rubber tubing or the like, is wedged in stirrup 14 between handle 13 and body 2, this arrangement providing sufficient friction binding the handle 13 within the stirrup 14, and yet permitting handle 13 to be rotated within stirrup 14 as required. Other means for causing the handle 13 to bind in stirrup 14 will occur to the reader, such as employing a plastic coated handle 13, or a spring within the stirrup exerting friction against the handle 13, or a toggle portion on the handle 13 engaging the stirrup and holding the handle in one of several pre-selected positions.

Lid 4, having the customary handle 16 and stamped with the customary stiffening rings 17, is provided with a circumscribing band 18 of vibration damping material, such as indented asphalt saturated felt. Said felt is maintained in position around lid 4 by means of a metallic circumscribing band 19, said band 19 engaging substantially the entire outer surface of the band 18 and cooperating with the flange of the lid 4 to constrain the band 18. Band 19 may be riveted or bolted to lid 4 through the band 18 or through holidays in the band 18, or may be spot welded to lid 4 through holidays in the band 18, or may simply be formed as a closed loop with ends lapped and secured to each other under such compression as to provide sufficient friction between bands 18 and 19 damps noise-producing vibrations generated by the relative to lid 4. Extending across the top of lid 4 is a strap 20 of vibration damping material, such as indented asphalt saturated felt. Said felt is maintained in position by means of metallic strap 21, the ends of the latter being tucked between lid 4 and bands 18 and 19 as shown. The strap 21 engages substantially the entire outer surface of strap 20, and cooperates with the top of the lid 4 to constrain the strap 20. Strap 20 may be cemented to lid 4, and strap 21 cemented to strap 20, by means of suitable adhesives, or rivets or bolts employed as hereinbefore described. The assembly of bands 18 and 19 damps noise-producing vibrations generated by the flange of lid 4, and straps 20 and 21 damp noiseproducing vibrations generated by the face of lid 4. The position of straps 20 and 21 on lid 4 is quite important, as this position, offset from the center of lid 4, straddles an area in which substantially all modes of vibration of the face of the lid 4 are present. In other words, placing the vibrationdamping arrangement in such offset position effectively damps substantially all of the vibration modes generated by the face of lid 4. In a specific example of practice, it has been found that, when straps 20 and 21, having a width of 1 inch, are mounted to a lid having a conven tional diameter of 18 inches with the center of the straps 20 and 21 offset 2% inches from the center of the lid, vibrations, and resulting noise, generated by the lid are most effectively reduced.

A somewhat modified form of vibration damping arrangement applied to the face of lid 4 is shown in FIG. 6. Straps 2t and 21 are not tucked between lid 4 and bands 18 or 19 as shown in FIG. 2, but rather stop short of the perimeter of lid 4-. Handle 16 is suitably mounted to strap 21.

Another form of can bottom 3, as shown in FIG. 7, is conventionally stamped to provide a number of concentric circular stiffening rings 7, without the stiffening legs shown in FIG. 4. Vibrations, and hence noise, generated by this form of bottom 3 are damped and lessened by means of a strap 22 of vibration damping materials such as indented asphalt saturated felt. A metallic strap 23 engages substantially the entire outer surface of the strap 22 and cooperates with the bottom 3 to constrain the strap 22. The said straps 22 and 23 are fastened to can bottom 3 in a manner similar to that herein disclosed for straps 20 and 21. The position of straps 22 and 23 on can bottom 3 is quite important, as this position, olfset from the center of bottom 3, straddles an area in which substantially all modes of vibration of the bottom 3 are present. In other words, placing the vibration damping arrangement in such offset position elfectively damps substantially all of the vibration modes generated by can bottom 3. In a specific example of practice, it has been found that when straps 22 and 23, having a width of 1 inch, are mounted to a can bottom having a conventional diameter of 15 inches, with the center of the straps 22 and 23 offset 3% inches from the center of the can bottom, vibrations, and resulting noise, generated by the can bottom are most effectively reduced.

Straps 22 and 23 may be used on the form of can bottom shown in FIG. 4, in place of plates '9 and 10.

I claim:

1. A receptacle comprising:

(a) a metallic body,

(b) a layer of vibration damping material peripherally engaging substantially the entire periphery of said body approximately at the area of greatest vibration thereof,

(c) means engaging substantially the entire outer surface of said layer, cooperating with saidbody to constrain said layer.

2. An article as in claim 1, in which means (b) and means (c) are disposed on the upper portion of said body.

3. An article as in claim 1, further comprising:

(d) a stirrup mounted to said body,

(e) handle means having a portion extending through and frictionally engaging said stirrup.

4. An article as in claim 1, in which said body is substantially cylindrical, further comprising:

(d) a metallic bottom mounted to the lower portion of said body and closing the bottom of said receptacle,

(e) a layer of vibration damping material engaging said bottom approximately at the area of greatest vibration thereof,

(f) means, engaging substantially the entire outer surface of means (e), cooperating with said bottom to constrain means (e).

5. An article as in claim 4, in which means (e) and means (f) comprise discs located concentrically to the bottom.

6. An article as in claim 4, in which means (e) and means (f) comprise straps located eccentrically to the bottom.

7. An article as in claim 4, further comprising:

(g) a metallic lid adapted to cover the upper end of said receptacle,

(h) a layer of virbation damping material engaging said lid at an area in which substantially all modes of vibration of the face of said lid are present,

(i) means, engaging substantially the entire outer surface of means (h), cooperating with said lid to constrain means (h).

8. An article as in claim 7, in which means (h) and means (i) comprise straps located eccentrically to the lid.

9. An article as in claim 8, in which a handle is mounted to said straps.

10. An article as in claim 7, in which said lid is provided with a circumferential flange, and a constrained layer of vibration damping material extends around the circumference of the flange of the lid.

11. An article as in claim 10, in which means (h) and means (i) comprise straps eccentrically engaging the face of said lid.

12. A metallic circular lid for a receptacle, said lid comprrsmg:

(a) a face portion,

(b) a circumferential flange extending around said face portion,

(c) a layer of vibration damping material engaging said lid,

(d) means, engaging substantially the entire outer surface of means (c), cooperating with said lid to constrain means (c).

13. An article as in claim 12, in which means (c) and means (d) comprise straps located eccentrically to the face of the lid.

14. An' article as in claim 13, in which a handle is mounted to said straps.

15. An article as in claim 12, in which means (c) and means (d) comprise straps extending around the circumference of the flange of the lid.

16. An article as in claim 15, further comprising:

(e) a strap of vibration damping material eccentrically engaging the face of said lid,

(f) means, engaging substantially the entire outer surface of means (e), cooperating with said lid to constrain means (e).

17. A receptacle comprising:

(a) a metallic substantially cylindrical body,

(b) a metallic bottom mounted to the lower portion of said body and closing the bottom of said receptacle,

(c) a layer of vibration damping material engaging said bottom,

(d) means, engaging substantially the entire outer surface of means (c), cooperating with said bottom to constrain means (0).

18. An article as in claim 17, in which means (c) and means (d) comprise discs located concentrically to the bottom.

19. An article as in claim 17, in which means (c) and means (d) comprise straps located eccentrically to the bottom.

20. A receptacle comprising:

(a) a metallic substantially cylindrical body,

(b) a belt of vibration damping material extending around the circumference of said body on the upper portion of said body on the outside of said body,

(0) a metallic strap extending around the outside of and coextensive with said belt, said strap constraining said belt and maintaining said belt in contact with said body,

(d) a stirrup mounted to said body,

(e) handle means having a portion extending through and frictionally engaging said stirrup,

(f) a metallic bottom mounted to the lower portion of said body and closing the bottom of said receptacle, said body extending below said bottom in the form of a circular flange,

(g) resilient means mounted to said flange and adapted to support said receptacle,

(h) a layer of vibration damping material engaging the underside of said bottom,

(i) means coextensive with and engaging the underside of means (h) for constraining means (h) and maintaining means (h) in contact with said bottom,

(i) a metallic lid adapted to cover the upper end of said receptacle, said lid having a face and a circircumferential flange of said lid,

(k) a strap of vibration damping material extending around the outside of said circumferential flange of the lid,

(1) a metallic strap coextensive with and engaging the outside of means (k) for constraining means (k) and maintaining means (k) in contact with said circumferential flange of said lid,

(m) a strap of vibration damping material located eccentrically to and extending across the upper surface of the face of said lid,

(11) a metallic strap coextensive With and engaging the upper surface of means (In) for constraining means (m) and maintaining means (m) in contact with the face of said lid.

21. An article as in claim 20, in which means (h) and means (i) comprise discs located concentrically to the bottom.

22. An article as in claim 20, in which means (h) and means (i) comprise straps located eccentrically to the bottom.

12/1927 Rosenberg 2207l 9/1939 Hanrahan 220-7l FOREIGN PATENTS 8/1935 Great Britain.

RAPHAEL H. SCHWARTZ, Primary Examiner US Cl. X.;R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1651552 *May 11, 1925Dec 6, 1927Rosenberg LouisCan
US2173804 *Sep 7, 1938Sep 19, 1939Petroleum Iron Works Company ORubber rolling hoop for steel barrels
GB433661A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5251780 *Nov 24, 1992Oct 12, 1993Zarn, Inc.Refuse container having removable wear-resistant pads
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/732, 220/766, 220/908, 220/632, 220/772
International ClassificationB65F1/14, B65F1/16
Cooperative ClassificationB65F2001/1661, B65F1/14, B65F2250/112, Y10S220/908
European ClassificationB65F1/14