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Publication numberUS3534993 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 20, 1970
Filing dateJul 5, 1968
Priority dateJul 5, 1968
Publication numberUS 3534993 A, US 3534993A, US-A-3534993, US3534993 A, US3534993A
InventorsRobert J Le Vesque Sr
Original AssigneeRobert J Le Vesque Sr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Underground residential distribution connect pole and high voltage fuse puller
US 3534993 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. J. LE VESQUE, SR UNDERGROUND RESIDENTIAL DISTRIBUTION CONNECT Oct. 20, 1970 I POLE AND HIGH VOLTAGE FUSE FULLER Filed July 5, 1968 A v i z a;

//v VENTO/E P055 J. 45 VES UE United States Patent UNDERGROUND RESIDENTIAL DISTRIBUTION CONNECT POLE AND HIGH VOLTAGE FUSE PULLER Robert J. Le Vesque, Sr., 11 E. Wyoming St., St. Paul, Minn. 55107 Filed July 5, 1968, Ser. No. 742,572 Int. Cl. A47f 13/06 US. Cl. 294-19 5 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A device for safely switching the high lvoltage terminator on the ends of electrical cables, the device including a long pole having a working head at one end comprised of a pair of movable jaws which can be opened or closed by rotating a handle on the opposite end of the post or pole.

This invention relates generally to fuse pullers.

It is generally well known to those skilled in the art that underground residential distribution systems consist of a group of transformers located within vaults in the ground, the transformers being fed by high voltage primary cables with special terminators on the ends of the cables for connection to the transformers. These terminators are made by RTE and ESNA companies and can be made to be switched on and oif.

A principal object of the present invention is to provide a device which may be used for switching on and off the high voltage underground distribution systems.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an underground residential distribution disconnect pole and high voltage fuse puller which includes a long pole of variable length to suit and wherein there is a working head at one end of the pole which is adaptable to communicate with the terminator, and the opposite end of the pole having a rotatable handle for operating the working head.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an underground residential distribution disconnect pole and high voltage fuse puller wherein the working head on one end of the pole comprises a pair of jaws for clamping therebetween the terminator at the end of the electric cable.

Other objects of the present invention are to provide an underground residential distribution disconnect pole and high voltage fuse puller which is simple in design, inexpensive to manufacture, rugged in construction, easy to use and efiicient in operation.

These and other objects will be readily evident upon a study of the following specification and the accompanying drawing wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the present invention shown partly in cross section so to illustrate the interior structure; and

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary side elevation view thereof.

Referring now to the drawing in detail, the reference numeral represents an underground residential distribution disconnect pole and high voltage fuse puller according to the present invention wherein there is a long, tubular pole 11 which may vary in length possible from four to ten feet, the pole having a central longitudinal extending handle 12 therethrough, the handle extending out of one end of the pole where it may be covered with a rubber hand grip.

A working head 13 at the opposite end of the pole comprises a bracket 14 secured by screws 15 to the end of the pole, the bracket supporting a pair of jaws 16. Each jaw includes one end of a bar 17 being secured Patented Oct. 20, 1970 pivotally free on a pin 18 mounted in the bracket 14, the

opposite end of each bar 17 having a semi-circular or semi-cylindrical jaw member 19 secured by a single bolt 20.

Intermediate the opposite ends of each bar 17, one end of a pair of links 21 are secured pivotally free by means of bolt 22, the opposite end of the links 21 being secured pivotally free by means of bolt 23 to a block 24 having a threaded opening 25 threadingly engaged upon a threaded shank 26 rigidly secured to one end of the handle 12. The stud 26 is fitted within a bushing 27 fitted into a sleeve 28 rigidly affixed to the end of the handle 12, the stud 26 receiving a rivet 29 therethrough which extends through the bushing and sleeve.

In operative use, the workman may thus be positioned some distance away from the hot cables and by turning the extending handle which protrudes from one end of the pole, he may manipulate the jaws so to close upon the special terminator on the end of the cable connected to the transformer. To use the device as a high voltage fuse puller, the workman can rotate the jaws and install or remove large fuses safely. It will be noted that each jaw member 19 also includes a semi-circular notch 30 along one side edge 31 thereof.

While various changes may be made in the detailed construction, it is understood that such changes will be within the spirit and scope of the present invention as is defined by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A tool for electrically insulatably gripping the high voltage electrical cable terminator of the type having a body portion and a leg portion angularly projecting from said body portion, said tool comprising a longitudinally extending pole, a working head at one end of said pole, said working head comprising a pair of opposing jaw members, said jaw members defining a frontal opening for gripping the body portion of said terminator and a lateral opening for gripping the leg portion of said terminator, and means for moving said jaw members toward and away from each other whereby said terminator can be gripped and released, said jaw members being arcuate shaped, and said frontal and said lateral openings being generally circularly shaped, said lateral opening being defined by semi-circular notches in lateral opposing edges of said jaw members.

2. The tool of claim 1 wherein said pole is tubular, and said means comprises: a handle member longitudinally extending through said pole; retractable means connected to the end of said handle adjacent said working head; said retractable means being operable from the other end of said handle; and linking means linking said jaws to said retractable means whereby said jaws can be moved toward and away from each other upon advancement and retraction of said retractable means.

3. The tool of claim 2 wherein said retractable means is threaded.

4. The tool of claim 2 wherein said retractable means is operable by rotatable movement of said handle from an axially aligned position.

5. A working head for a tool adapted for electrically insulatably gripping the high voltage electrical cable terminator of the type having a body portion and a leg portion angularly projecting from said body portion, said working head comprising a longitudinally extending pole, a working head at one end of said pole, said working head comprising a pair of opposing jaw members, said jaw members defining a frontal opening for gripping the body portion of said terminator and a lateral opening for gripping the leg portion of said terminator, and means for moving said jaw members toward and away from each other whereby said terminator can be gripped and 3 released, said jaw members being arcuate shaped, and said frontal and said lateral openings being generally circularly shaped, said lateral opening being defined by semi-circular notches in lateral opposing edges of said jaw members.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,814,368 7/1931 Chapman 294-106 Freidlein 294-106 Keehn 294-106 Dean 294-106 Chadwick 294-19 US. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1814368 *May 2, 1930Jul 14, 1931Chapman Edward LStub axle puller
US1938419 *Oct 7, 1932Dec 5, 1933Freidlein Alva GGripping tool
US2191170 *Apr 26, 1938Feb 20, 1940Doerfer John AAutomatic gaff hook
US2229800 *Mar 20, 1939Jan 28, 1941William T DeanTongs
US2646304 *Mar 22, 1948Jul 21, 1953Wellington S ChadwickInsulated electrical tool
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3863976 *Feb 12, 1973Feb 4, 1975Westinghouse Electric CorpRemotely operable explosive plug insertion tool
US4034542 *Apr 19, 1976Jul 12, 1977Loehr Leslie KFruit picking implements
US4132441 *Oct 17, 1977Jan 2, 1979Watkins Murrell WHead for removing fuse holder
US4173365 *May 26, 1978Nov 6, 1979Balzers Aktiengesellschaft Fur Hochvakuumtechnik Und Dunne SchichtenClamping device for transporting specimen plates
US4525006 *May 2, 1983Jun 25, 1985R.J. Levesque Manufacturing Co.Electrical disconnect tool
US4711482 *Feb 24, 1987Dec 8, 1987N/C IndustriesReaching aid for the handicapped
US5487579 *Aug 26, 1993Jan 30, 1996Exabyte CorporationPicker mechanism for data cartridges
US5691859 *Dec 19, 1995Nov 25, 1997Exabyte CorporationDrive with features which adjust and actuate cartridge transport and library with such drive
US5765453 *Jun 23, 1995Jun 16, 1998Mims; Parker B.For removing and replacing a photocell in a fixture
US5768047 *Dec 19, 1995Jun 16, 1998Exabyte CorporationCartridge library with duel-sided rotatable spit having latch member extending through aperture in circular toothed end wall
US6299228 *Feb 1, 2000Oct 9, 2001Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Gripper apparatus for robots
US6508496 *Apr 16, 2002Jan 21, 2003Tsung-Chi HuangManually-operated device for picking up objects
US6553871 *Aug 16, 2001Apr 29, 2003Adc Telecommunications, Inc.Fuse tool
US6655235May 9, 2001Dec 2, 2003Adc Telecommunications, Inc.Fuse tool
US6922888May 23, 2002Aug 2, 2005Speed Systems Inc.Loadbreak elbow pulling tool apparatus
WO2003015992A1 *Aug 8, 2002Feb 27, 2003Adc Telecommunications IncFuse tool
Classifications
U.S. Classification81/3.8, 294/106, 294/174
International ClassificationH01H85/02
Cooperative ClassificationH01H85/0208
European ClassificationH01H85/02C