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Publication numberUS3537279 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 3, 1970
Filing dateJun 28, 1967
Priority dateJun 28, 1967
Also published asDE1760761A1
Publication numberUS 3537279 A, US 3537279A, US-A-3537279, US3537279 A, US3537279A
InventorsPreston C Epley
Original AssigneePilot Res Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Knit seamless brassiere and method of forming same
US 3537279 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov.- 3, 1970 P. c. EPLEY 3,537,279

KNIT SEAMLESS BRASSIERE AND METHOD OF FOMING SAME Filed June '28,1967 '3 sheets-sheet 1 su Y .- I4 n y I l PRESTON C. EPLE-Y ll 9 '2 INVENTOR:

ATTORNEYS lNov. 3, 1970 P. c. EPLEY Y 3,537,279

KNIT SEAMLESS BRASSIERE AND METHOD OF FORMING SAME Filed 3111x9128, 1967 Y sheets-sheets INVENTOR? PRESTON C. EPLE-Y ATTORNEYS United States Patent O 3,537,279 KNIT SEAMLESS BRASSIERE AND METHOD OF FORMING SAME Preston C. Epley, Valdese, N.C., assignor to Pilot Research Corporation, Valdese, N.C., a corporation of North Carolina Filed June 28, 1967, Ser. No. 649,564 Int. Cl. D04b l/24 U.S. Cl. 66-176 11 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A brassiere type garment including a knit seamless blank having a pair of fashioned breast-receiving pockets. In one embodiment connector strips are provided above and below the pockets, upwardly tapering support panels extend above each pocket, and support straps are joined to the upper ends of the support panels. In another embodiment, the connector strip is omitted above the pockets and the support straps are replaced by a few complete courses completely surrounding the upper edge of the garment. All portions of each embodiment of the garment blank are fashioned to the desired shape while the garment is being knit on a circular knitting machine.

This invention relates generally to a seamless formtting article of ladies wearing apparel and to the method of knitting the same. More particularly, this invention relates to a circularly knit seamless garment blank having a pair of fashioned breast cups or pockets and in which the surrounding fabric is fashioned so that the blank may be easily formed into a brassiere, halter, or top for a swim suit.

It is known to form breast-receiving pockets by narrowing and widening on circular and full-fashioned knitting machines. In most cases, these pockets are separately formed and sewn in the proper positions with other knit or woven material to complete the brassiere. However, this type of construction requires highly trained operators to perform the required cutting and sewing operation and results in seams which can be uncomfortable. In some cases, the cups or pockets have been joined together during the knitting operation toV reduce the number of seams in the brassiere and to reduce the cost of manufacture. This type of brassiere does not provide the required degree of support because the blank is knit in such a manner that the courses extend in a vertical direction or from top to bottom.

With the foregoing in mind, it is an object of the present invention to provide a form-fitting brassiere type garment which is formed of a knit seamless blank having a pair of spaced apart breast-receiving cups or pockets and wherein the knit courses connect the pockets together and extend in a horizontal direction around the body.

One embodiment of the present garment includes upper and lower connector strips joined to each other and fashioned support panels integrally knit with the upper connector strip and extending upwardly above each of the pockets. 'Ihis embodiment also includes strap portionsintegrally knit with the upper ends of the fashioned support panels.

Another embodiment of the present garment is knit to completely encircle the body and includes only a single connector portion extending beneath the pockets. In this garment, the strap portions are omitted and replaced by a few complete courses which extend around the upper edge.

Either embodiment of the present brassiere type garment blank may be economically formed on a circular knitting machine. In accordance with the preferred meth- "ice od, the fashioned sections of the brassiere blank are successively knit and joined together during the knitting operation to provide a one-piece seamless blank which can be nished by the simple addition of supporting bands, straps, or the like. Each pocket of the garment includes fashioned gussets which are formed by narrowing and widening, and the rate of narrowing and widening is preferably increased near the outer junctures of the gussets to provide the pockets with a rounder appearance and a better t.

Some of the objects of the invention having been stated, other objects will appear as the description proceeds when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which- FIG. 1 is an isometric view of one embodiment of the seamless brassiere of the present invention and illustrating its appearance when Worn;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the seamless brassiere blank with the pockets attened and folded downwardly, and showing its appearance before it is finished and the supporting straps are added thereto;

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 2, but showing the pockets extending upwardly to show the lower gussets of the breast pockets;

FIG. 4 is a schematic lay-out of the knitted blank, as it would appear with the gussets of the breast pockets and the adjacent courses being separated;

FIG. 5 is a front view of a second embodiment of the seamless brassiere of the present invention;

FIG. 6 is a rear view of the brassiere blank shown in FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a side elevational view of the brassiere blank shown in FIGS. 5 and 6; and

FIG. 8 is a schematic lay-out of the knitted blank, as it would appear with the gussets of the breast pockets and the adjacent courses being separated and with the blank cut along a rear medial wale line.

The iirst embodiment of brassiere blank (FIGS. 2 and 3) is of a one-piece seamless construction and is preferably knit on a circular knitting machine which is reciprocated throughout the knitting of the blank. The second embodiment of the brassiere blank (FIGS. 5-7) is also of a one-piece seamless construction and is preferably knit on a circular knitting machine; however, only the central portion of the blank is knit by reciprocation of the needle cylinder while the initial courses and the final courses are knit with continuous rotation of the needle cylinder.

The knitting machine may be of any desired type having suitable means for selecting certain groups of needles to knit while maintaining other groups of needles in an inactive position, and means for increasing and decreasing the number of needles knitting to form widened and narrowed partial courses while the needle cylinder is being reciprocated. For example, this seamless brassiere blank may be knit on a circular machine of the type disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,292,392.

In the drawings, the garment blanks have been lined to indicate the direction in which the wales extend, it being understood that the courses of the knit fabric extend in the transverse direction. The first embodiment of brassiere and the corresponding blank is shown in FIGS. 1-4 and generally includes strap portions 10, 11, fashioned support panels 12, 13, respective upper and lower connector or body strips 14, 15, and breast-receiving pockets including respective upper gussets 16, 17 and lower gussets 18, 19. Opposite ends of the partial courses of the upper and lower gussets are connected together along suture lines formed during the knitting of the pockets.

The brassiere blank may be finished in any desired manner and, as shown in FIG. 1, back strap or band portions 22, 23 may be suitably secured at one end to oppo- Vsite side portions of the blank and their other ends may be adjustably connected by suitable fastener means, such as hooks 24. The back band portions 22, 23 may be formed' of woven or knitted material which may be elastic or inelastic. Shoulder straps 26, 27 may be adjustably secured at one end to the corresponding upper end portions of the strap portions 10, 11 and their other ends may be suitably connected to the respective back band portions 22, 23. If desired, a binding tape or other suitable edging material 30 may be attached along the lower edge portion of the brassiere blank and the support bands 22, 23, by any suitable means, such as sewing.

It is preferred that the brassiere blank be knit of some I formed of a plurality of partial courses which extend from one side of the garment blank to the other and above the breast pockets. It is preferred that these partial courses of this strip 14 extend beyond opposite sides of each breast pocket and the terminal or lower partial course of the v strip 14 is integrally knit with the initial narrowed partial v courses of the narrowed gussets 16, 17 of each pocket and extends therebetween. The lower connectors or body strip 15 is also formed of a plurality of partial courses which extend from one side of the garment blau-k to the other, and the initial or upper partial course is integrally knit withthe last partial course of the widened gussets 18, 19 integrally knit with that portion of the lower partial course of the strip 14 between the breast pockets, and integrally knit with those portions of the lower partial course of the strip 14 which extends beyond opposite sides of the breast pockets. V

The support panels 12, 13, are integrally knit with and extend upwardly from the uppermost partial course of the connector strip 14 and are preferably centered above the breast pockets 16, 17.

i METHOD OF KNITTING FIRST EMBODIMENT The preferred method of knitting the rstrembodiment of the brassiere blank will be described with particular reference to FIG. 4.,A group of successive needles at one position inthe needle cylinder is positioned to move along the active or knitting path while the remaining needles move along the inactive ornon-knitting path. The yarn is Yfed to this group of active needles while the needle cylinder is reciprocated to form a plurality of successive partial courses of the same length and form the support strap portion 10 of the desired length, down to the dash-dot line 31.

With continued reciprocation of the needle cylinder, the widening picks are rendered active to gradually increase the length of successive partial courses. For example, one additional needle maybe moved to the active path with each swing of the needle cylinder during the knitting of the support panel 12 and provide outwardly diverging selvage edge portions at opposite sides thereof. Upon completion of the support .panel 12, along the dash-dot line 32, the active needles are positioned to move along an inactive path and a Igroup of successive needles spaced around the needle cylinder are positioned to move along the active path and the yarn is fed thereto to begin the knitting of the support strap portion 11. During the knitting of the strap portion 11, the widening picks are inoperative so that successive partial courses of the same length are knit with each reciprocation of the needle cylinder, down to the dash-dot line 33. Then, the widening picks are again activated to gradually increase the length of successive partial courses during the knitting of the support panel 13 and to form outwardly diverging selvage edges at opposite sides thereof, down to the dash-dot line 34.

At this point, the widening picks are rendered inoperative and the needles which had been holding the stitch loops of the last partial course of the support panel 12 (along dash-dot line 32) are positioned to move along an active path so that with the next swing of the needle cylinder, the iirst partial course of the -upper connector or body strip 14 is knit. This first or upper partial course of the connector strip 14 extends from one side of the lbrassiere blank to the other, and along the dash-dot lines 32, 34, being joined to the terminal or lower partial courses of each support panel 12, 13. Any desired number of partial courses may be knit to complete the required length of the upper connector strip 14.

Upon completion of the terminal or lower partial course of the connector strip 14, along the dash-dot line 35, all active needles, except that group of successive needles required to knit the rst partial course of the narrowed upper gusset 17, are positioned to move along an inactive path and the narrowing picks of the machine are rendered operative. With continued reciprocation of the needle cylinder, partial courses will then be knit on the active group of needles to form the upper or narrowed gusset 17 of the first breast pocket. During the knitting of this rst portion of the upper gusset 17, the narrowing picks gradually reduce the number of active needles knitting in successive partial courses 'by raising the endmost needles to an inoperative position sothat the fabric is gradually narrowed andthe stitch loops at opposite selvage edges are held on the needles which are moved to inactive position.

It is preferred that one needle be moved to inactive position with each stroke of the needle cylinder throughout the knitting of the rst portiontof the gusset 17 and down to the'dash-dot line 36. At this point, it is preferred that the fabric be narrowed at a faster rate, for example, two needles with each stroke of the needle cylinder, to complete theknitting of the rst upper gusset 17, down to the dash-dot line 37.

The widening picks are then rendered operative to begin widening the fabric, preferably by two needles with each swing of the needle cylinder, to form the first portion 0f the widened or lower gusset 19, down to the dashdot line 38. As the needles are gradually brought back into active position in this widening operation, the stitch loops at opposite sides of the gusset 19 are drawn through the stitch loops which had been held on the inactive needles to form suture lines connecting opposite side edges ofthe narrowed gusset 17 to the opposite side edges of the widened gusset 19. Below the dash-,dot line 38, `the fabric is widened at a decreased rate, for example, one needle is brought to the activelevel with each swing of the needle cylinder and the ends of these widened partial courses are joined to the ends of the narrowed partial courses of the upper gusset 17 to complete the knitting of the rst breast pocket, along the dash-dot line 40.

. The active needles which knit the last partial course of the widened gusset 19 are then moved to an inactive position and the group of needles required to knit the narrowed gusset 16 are moved to the active position to form the first partial course in the narrowed gusset 16, along the right-hand portion of the dash-dot line 35. The narrowing picks are moved to the operative position and with continued reciprocation of the needle cylinder, the number of needles knitting the successive partial courses is reduced as the narrowed gusset 16 is knit.

During the knitting of the first portion of the narrowed gusset 16, down to the dash-dot line 42, the narrowing picks preferably move one needle to inactive position with each swing of the needle cylinder and the stitch loops are held on the needles as they are moved to inactive position at opposite sides of the gusset 16. Below the dash-dot line 42 and down to the dash-dot line 43, the fabric is narrowed at a faster rate, for example, two needles with each swing of the needle cylinder.

After completion of the knitting of the narrowed gusset 16, along the dash-dot line 43, the widening picks are activated so that the fabric is then widened, two needles with each swing of the needle cylinder. These widened partial courses of the widened gusset 18 are connected to the endmost stitch loops at opposite sides of the narrowed gusset 16 to form suture lines connecting the opposite sides of the narrowed gusset 16 to the opposite sides of the gusset 18.

These suture lines extend at substantially right angles to the knit wales so that they extend in a horizontal direction across opposite side portions of each breast pocket.

Below the dash-dot line 44, the fabric is widened at a lesser rate, for example, one additional needle with each swing of the needle cylinder, until completion of the widened gusset, along the right-hand portion of the dash-dot line 40. Then, all of the inactive needles are moved to the active level so that the lower connector or body strip 15 is knit with continued reciprocation of the needle cylinder. As the previously inactive needles are brought into action, those portions of the partial course formed Ibetween the widened gussets 18, 19 and on opposite sides thereof are connected to the stitch loops of the corresponding portions of the terminal partial course of the upper connector strip 14, which had been held on the inactive needles. During the knitting of the lower portion of the connector strip 15, below the dash-dot line 46, a stronger elastic yarn may be utilized, if desired.

While the knitting of the various sections of the first embodiment of the blank (FIG. 4) has been described as proceeding in a particular manner, it is to be understood that this particular procedure need not necessarily be followed. For example, instead of knitting the strap portion rst, it may be desirable to knit the strap portion 11 first. Also, it may be desirable to knit the narrowed and widened gussets 16, 18 before knitting the narrowed and widened gussets 17, 19. Also, it may be desirable to sirnultaneously knit the strap portions 10, 11, the support panels 12, 13, and the breast pockets, and this may be accomplished by using a knitting machine having knitting stations at opposite sides of the needle cylinder.

In some instances it may be desirable to vary the length of the partial courses of the connector strips 14, 1S. For example, the lengths of these partial courses may be gradually increased by a widening operation so that the corresponding side edges flare outwardly. Also, the connector strips 14, may be knit of complete courses by continuously rotating the needle cylinder. In this case, the opposite edge portions of the blank would be joined together as the blank is knit.

The second embodiment of the brassiere blank (FIGS. 5-7) is disclosed as being of the type known as a longline brassiere and is shown having a low cut back portion. This second embodiment of brassiere and the corresponding blank (FIGS. 5-7) generally includes a plurality of complete circular courses forming an upper binding or selvage edge or band portion 50, fashioned support panels 52, 53, breast-receiving pockets including respective upper .gussets 56, 57 and lower gussets 58, 59, a fashioned connector strip 55 extending between and connecting the breast pockets, a plurality of continuous complete courses 60 which form a body encircling band, and a lower turned Welt portion 61 which is formed of complete circular courses. Opposite ends of the partial courses of the upper and lower gussets are connected together along suture lines formed during the knitting of the pockets.

The brassiere blank (FIG. 8) may be nished in any desired manner, and as shown in FIG. 6, may be provided with shoulder support straps 62, 63 which may be suitably connected at opposite ends to the circular courses 50 above the respective support panels 52, 53 and to the circular courses 50 above the body encircling portion 60, at the rear of the garment. If desired, the rear of the brassiere may be cut along a wale line along the center back portion and provided with suitable fastening means such as an adjustable hook band or the like, not shown.

If desired, a suitable binding tape or other suitable edging material, not shown, may be attached along the upper and/ or lower edge of the brassiere, by any suitable means, such as sewing. As best shown in FIGS. 5-7, the garment blank comes from the knitting machine in a condition that it may be worn and itis of a single one-piece construction, the various sections being fashioned to the desired shape and integrally knit together during the knitting operation.

METHOD OF KNITIING SECOND EMBODIMENT The preferred method of knitting the second embodiment of the brassiere blank will be described with particular reference to FIG. 8. Knitting of the garment blank is begun by forming a make-up in the usual manner; i.e., by feeding the yarn to alternate needles during the rst rotation of the cylinder and then feeding the yarn to all of the needles. If desired, the upper edge portion of the border 50 may be made to roll upon itself by forming a four course pattern of held and oat stitches, following the make-up courses. For example, every other needle picks up the yarn and forms a held stitch in the initial course of the pattern and then the yarn is floated across these held stitch Wales as the following three courses are knit so that these held loops cause the fabric to draw down and rollupon itself. Following this pattern of courses, any desired number of complete courses may be knit on all needles to complete the upper binding edge 50. These courses are preferably formed of an elastic yarn and a stretchable thermoplastic yarn knit in plated relationship for about l2-\1 6` courses.

Following the completion of the binding edge portion 50, all the needles, except those needles which knit the upper portion of the support panel 52 between the dashdot lines 64, 65 (FIG. 8), are switched to an inactive position so that they do not knit but merely hold the stitch loops thereon. This -small group of active needles then successively pass through the knitting station as reciprocation is imparted to the needle cylinder. The widening picks are activated to `gradually increase the length of successive partial courses at the upper portion of the support panel 52. These first few widened partial courses are preferably knit of the elastic yarn and thermoplastic stretch yarn in plated relationship. After this first few gradually increased partial courses are knit, along the line indicated at 66 (FIG. 8), it is preferred that the elastic yarn be withdrawn and the remainder of the widened support panel 52 is knit of the thermoplastic stretchable yarn, down to the dash-dot line 67. The widening of the partial courses of the -support panel 52 may proceed in any desired manner, it being preferred that one additional needle be moved into the active path with each swing of the needle cylinder during the knitting of the support panel 52 to provide outwardly diverging opposite side portions connected to the band 50.

Upon completion of the support panel 52, along the dash-dot line 67, groups of active needles outside of the dash-dot lines `68, =69 are moved to an inactive path and the narrowing picks are activated so that the remaining active needles knit the rst partial course of the upper narrowed Igusset 56 of the breast pocket. During the knitting of the first portion of the gusset 56, the length of the partial courses gradually increases, preferably by one needle with each swing of the needle cylinder, down to the dash-dot line 70. From th-e dash-dot line 70 down to the dash-dot line 71, i't is preferred that two needles be moved to the inactive path with each swing of the needle cylindeito increase the rate of narrowing. Between the dash-dot line 71 and the dash-dot line 72 (where the narrowedr upper gusset 56 is completed) it is preferred that three needles be raised to an inactive position with each swing of the needle cylinder.

Below the dash-dot line 72, the widening picks are activated and the length of the partial courses is gradually increased, preferably by three needles with each swing of the needle cylinder down to the dash-dot line 73. As the length of the partial courses of the widened lower gusset 58 is gradually increased, the stitches at opposite ends are joined to the endmost stitches of the partial courses of the narrowed upper gusset 56 to form the suture lines along opposite sides of each breast pocket. From the dash-dot line 73 to the dash-dot line 74, two needles are preferably moved toinactive position with each swing of the needle cylinder and below the dash-dot line 74, down to the das'hdot line 75, a single needle is moved to inactive position with each swing of the needle cylinder to correspond with the rate of narrowing of the upper gusset 56.

These active needles forming the last partial course of the gusset 58, along the dash-dot line 75, are then moved to inactive position and the needles which begin knitting of the support panel 53 (the |group of needles between the dash-dot lines 76, 77) are moved to the active position and the widening picks are activated. As reciprocation of the needle cylinder continues with the widening picks in active position, the widened partial courses at the upper end of the support panel 53 are knit, preferably with the ,elastic yarn and the thermoplastic stretchable yarn in plated relationship, down to the line indicated at 78 in FIG. 8. Widening continues below the line `78 and down to the dashdot line 80 where the widened support -panel 53 is completed. The rate of widening in the support panel 53 is preferably one additional needle with each swing of lthe needle cylinder.

The groups of active needles outside of the dash-dot lines 81, |82 are then moved to an inactive position and knitting of the narrowed upper gusset 57 begins on the active needles and with the narrowing picks in operative position. The rate of narrowing of the upper portion of the gusset 57 is preferably at the rate of one needle with each swing of the needle cylinder, down to the dash-dot line 83. Between the dash-dot line 83 and the dash-dot line 84, the rate of narrowing is preferably two needles with each swing, and below the dash-dot line 84, to the completion of the upper gusset 57 along dash-dot line 85, the rate of narrowing is three needles with each swing of the needle cylinder. t

With continued reciprocation of the needle cyllnder, the widening picks are activated to gradually increase the length of the partial courses in the upper part of the wrdencd lower gusset 59 at a rate of three additional needles with each swing of the needle cylinder, down to the dash-dot line 86. Below the dash-dot line 86, and to the dash-dot line 87, theprreferred rate of widening is two needles with each swing of the needle cylinder. Below the dash-dot line 87 the rate of widening is preferably one needle with each swing of the needle cylinder, down to dash-dot line 88 where the widened gusset 59 is completed. As thewidened gusset 59 is formed and additional needles are brought into active position, the stitches at opposite ends of the partial courses thereof are joined to the stitch loops of the partial courses of the upper gusset 57 to form the suture lines connecting opposite sides of the narrowed gusset 57 and the widened gusset 59.

Upon completion of the widened gusset 59, all of the needles between the dash-dot lines 90, 91 (FIG. 8) are moved to an active position and with continued reciprocation of the needle cylinder, the lower connector panel or fashioned support panel 55 is formed with the widening picks activated. The preferred rate of widening of the partial courses is one needle with each swing of the needle cylinder, down to the dash-dot line 92 where the support panel 55 is completed.

Then, the remainder of the needlets in the needle cylinder are moved to an active position and the needle cylinder is continuously rotated to form the band 60, the initial course of which `is connected to the support panel 55 and to that portion of the band 50 at opposite sides of the dash-dot lines 93, 94. The supportband 60 may be knit any desired length and the turned welt portion 61 is preferably formed by moving elternate needles to an inactive position so that they'do not knit;while the remaining needles form regular stitches and upon completion of a predetermined number of courses, the inactive needles again knit to cause the fabric to be turned and joined to itself. After returning the inactive needles to active position, to turn the welt portion 61, knitting on all needles continues for a few complete courses to complete the knitting of the garment blank. This turned welt portion may be attached to the support band 60 by an overedge seam or the like, if desired.

If desired, either embodiment of the garment blank may be knit in the reverse direction from the described; i.e., from bottom to top.` In this case, it would be necessary to seam or otherwise bind the opposite edges of the support panels 12, 13 of the iirst embodiment since the partial courses would be narrowed and runs could develop. However, this would not be necessary in the case of the second embodiment because the ends of the partial courses of the support panels 52, 53 are connected to the circular band 50.

Regardless of the sequence of kntting, the resulting seamless brassiere blank may be utilized in the formation of brassieres, halters, .bathing suit tops and the like. It is to be understood that the size and shape of the various portions of the blank, including the breast pockets, may be varied by varying the number of needles knitting, the gauge of the machine on which the garment is knit, the length of stitch formed, the rate at which the fabric is widened and narrowed, etc. Also, the amount of support provided by the garment may be varied by knttng the type of yarn which will give the desired result.

In the specification and drawings, there have been set forth preferred embodiments of the invention, and although specilic terms are employed, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense only and not for purposes of limitation, the scope of the invention being defined in the claims.

I claim:

1. A knit seamless blank adapted to form a brassiere type garment and comprising a pair of breast-receiving pockets spaced from each other, each pocket including single upper and lower fashioned gussets joined together along single` suture lines extending `at substantially right angles to the knit wales of the garment and being posi` tioned at opposite sides of said pocket, a fashioned support panel extending aboveI each ofsaid pockets, each of said support panels having opposite selvaged edges tapering inwardly toward each other adjacent the upper end thereof, said support panels each being centered above corresponding breast-receiving pockets, a first group of courses of equal length extending below said support panels with the upper course being integrally knit with the lower courses of each support panel, and a second group of courses extending below said pockets with the upper course being integrally knit with the lower course of each gusset of each pocket.

2. A garment according to claim 1, including support straps integral with an extending upwardly from the upper etnds of said support panels, and said support straps each having parallel opposite selvage side edges.

3. A knit seamless blank adapted to form a brassiere type garment and comprising a pair of breast-receiving pocket spaced from eachother, each pocket including single upper and lower fashioned gussets joined together along single suture lines-*extending at substantially right angles to the knit wales ofthe garment and being positioned at knit with the lower course of each gusset of each pocket, the course of said group of courses below said pockets being integrally knit with the portions of said lower courses of said fashioned support panels which extend beyond said upper course of the upper fashioned gussets, and a group of courses extending along the upper edge of the blank and being integrally knit with said support panels and said group of courses extending below said pockets.

4. A knit seamless blank according to claim 3, wherein said group of courses extending below said pockets are fashioned so that opposite sides diverge and form continuations of distal sides of said support panels.

V5. A knit seamless blank according to claim 4 including a group of complete courses integrally knit with the fashioned group of courses extending below said pockets and forming a body encircling band portion.

6. A knit-seamless blank according to claim 5 including a turned welt integrally knit with the lower course of the complete courses forming the body encircling band.

7. A method of knitting a seamless garment blank for use in the formation of a form-fitting brassiere type garment adapted to cover the breasts of the wearer, said blank including a pair of breast-receiving pockets spaced from each other, a fashioned support panel above each pocket, and a group of courses extending below said pockets and connecting said pockets, said method including the successive steps of knitting a plurality of-partial courses of gradually increasing length to form one of the support panels, knitting one of the pockets by successively forming a single group of narrowed partial courses and a single group of widened partial courses joined at opposite ends, knitting a plurality of partial courses of gradually increasing length to form the other support panel, knitting the other pocket by successively forming a single group of narrowed partial courses and a single group of widened partial courses joined at opposite ends, and knitting a plurality of partial courses beneath and joined to the pockets.

8. A method according to claim 7 including the step of knitting a rst plurality of complete courses prior to knitting the support panel, and knitting a second plurality of complete courses joined to the partial courses beneath the pockets, the rst plurality of complete courses forming an upper edge portion extending around the garment blank and the second plurality of complete courses forming a body encircling band.

9. A method of knitting a seamless garment blank for use in the formation of a form-fitting'brassiere type garment adapted to cover the breasts of the wearer, said blank including a pair of breast-receiving pockets spaced from each other, and connector strips extending above and below said pockets and connnecting said pockets, said method including the steps of knitting a plurality of partial courses of equal length to form the upper connector strip, knitting one of the pockets at one side of the upper connector strip by successively forming groups of narrowed and widened partial courses joined at opposite ends, knitting the'other pocket at the other side of the upper connector strip by successively forming groups of narrowed and widened partial courses joined at opposite ends, and knitting a plurality of partial courses of equal length to form the lower connector strip equal in length to the length of the partial courses of said upper connector strip and joined to the pockets and the upper connector strip.

10. A method according to claim '9 including the steps of knitting one group of widened partial courses joined to the upper connector strip and above one of the pockets, and knitting another group of widened partial courses joined to the upper connector strip and above the other pocket, said groups of widened partial courses forming support panels having opposite selvaged edges tapering inwardly toward each other adjacent the upper ends thereof.

11. A method according to claim 10 including the steps of knitting one group of partial courses of equal length joined to the upper end of one support panel, and knitting another group of partial courses of equal length joined to the upper end of the other support panel, said groups of partial courses of equal length forming a support strap extending upwardly from each support panel.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,984,326 12/ 1934 Titone 66-176 2,013,110 9/ 1935 Rosenthal 66-176 2,397,247 3/ 1946 Davidson 66-176 3,092,987 6/ 1963 Levine 66-198 XR 3,226,957 1/ 1966 Gordon 66-176 3,283,545 11/1966 Simon 66-177 3,389,580 6/ 1968 Bentley et al 66-176 XR FOREIGN PATENTS 86,903 3/ 1966 France.

1,315,188 12/ 1962 France.

WM. CARTER REYNOLDS, Primary Examiner U.S. Cl. XR.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3, 537, 279 Dated November 3, 1970 Inventor (s) Preston C. Epley It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 3, line 30, "connectors" should read "connector". Column 5, line 12, insert --Wdened before "gusset". Column 6, line 66, "increases" should read "decreases". Column 8, line 2, "elternate" should be "alternate";

line 14, "the" should be "that";

line 23, "kntting" should be "knittng";

line 32, "knttng" should be "knitting" line 61, "etnds" should be "ends";

line 65, "pocket" should be "pockets". Column 9, line 2, insert upper between I'the" and "course".

SIGNED AMJ SEALED JAN 5 197| csEAL) Attest:

Edward M. Fletch, Jr.

mm1. f.; m. Attestxng Officer @Omissioner of Patggtp FORM P0-1050 (l0-69) uscoMM-Dc scan-pw

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FR86903E * Title not available
FR1315188A * Title not available
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Classifications
U.S. Classification66/176, 66/189, 450/65, D02/708
International ClassificationD04B1/24, A41C3/00
Cooperative ClassificationD04B1/246, D10B2403/0332, D04B1/108, A41C3/0014
European ClassificationD04B1/24B, D04B1/10B3, A41C3/00C