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Publication numberUS3538663 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 10, 1970
Filing dateJul 1, 1968
Priority dateJul 1, 1968
Publication numberUS 3538663 A, US 3538663A, US-A-3538663, US3538663 A, US3538663A
InventorsMacleod John H
Original AssigneeRobertson Co H H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Building wall fin unit
US 3538663 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 10,1970

J. H. M LEOD 3,538,663

BUILDING WALL FIN UNIT Filed July 1, 1968 INVENTOR.

JOHN H. MAC LEOD 3,538,663 BUILDING WALL FIN UNIT John H. MacLeod, San Marino, Calif., assignor to H. H. Robertson Company, Pittsburgh, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Filed July 1, 1968, Ser. No. 741,546 Int. Cl. E04f 19/02; E04c 2/38 US. Cl. 52-309 8 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the invention This invention relates to a fin unit, and more particularly to a fin unit adapted for erection with a building wall for service as an architectural column-like building feature element.

Description of the prior art Building wall fins are used extensively in new building structures. The wall fins project outwardly from the building exterior wall and serve as prominent feature elements. The wall fins interrupt the large expanse of essentially fiat wall areas and render these wall areas more attractive. The wall fins normally are non-load bearing elements.

In the past, the building wall fins have comprised precast concrete elements having a white appearance.

The use of pre-cast concrete wall fins has many disadvantages. The weight of pre-cast concrete wall fins is great. For example, a recently erected building has a plurality of 26 feet long, precast concrete wall fins having a weight per foot of length of fin of 770 pounds or a gross weight of 10 tons each. In a proposed building, the precast concrete wall fins would have a weight per foot of length of fin of 300 pounds. The great weight of the precast concrete wall fins adds considerably to the structural steel tonnage of the building frame and to the foundation cost. Additionally, complicated wall fin-to-spandrel beam connections are required and expensive erection procedures are necessary. The use of pre-cast concrete fins is not an efficient use of materials since the wall fins are non-load bearing elements.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The principal object of this invention is to provide a building wall fin unit which is relatively light in weight and which may be produced in a variety of architectural configurations.

Another object of this invention is to provide a building wall fin which does not have the disadvantages of the prior art pre-cast concrete wall fins.

The present invention provides a building wall fin comprising a generally U-shaped outer shell having spaced-apart inboard longitudinal edges and a generally U-shaped inner shell having spaced-apart inboard longitudinal edges. The inner shell is secured in spaced-apart relation to the outer shell whereby a generally U-shaped cavity is defined by the two shells. A light-weight foamed insulating material is disposed between the inner shell and the outer shell for maintaining the inner shell and United States Patent ice the outer shell in the aforesaid spaced-apart relation. Bracket means having one end secured to the inner shell project at the other end away from the inboard longitudinal edges of the shells and adapt the building wall fin for erection to a building structural framework.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a building provided with building wall fin units of this invention;

FIGS. 2, 3 and 4 are fragmentary isometric views illustrating alternative arrangements of the present building wall fin unit;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary side view illustrating the securement of the building wall fin unit of FIG. 2 to a building framework;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary side view illustrating the securement of the building wall fin unit of FIGS. 3 and 4 to a building framework;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view, on an enlarged scale, illustrating a cap member adhesively secured to the inner and outer shells of the present building wall fin unit;

FIG. 8 is a side view, in cross-section, illustrating a butt joint between two vertically aligned fin units of this invention;

FIG. 9 is an exploded side view, in cross-section, illustrating an overlapped connection between two vertically aligned fin units of this invention;

FIGS. 10-13, inclusive, are transverse cross-sectional views illustrating alternative configurations of the present building wall fin unit; and

FIG. 14 is a schematic end view of the building wall fin unit of FIG. 2, illustrating various dimensions.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS FIG. 1 illustrates a building 20 having exterior walls 22 and a roof 23. Each of the exterior walls 22 is provided with a plurality of building wall fin units 24. The wall fin units project outwardly from the exterior wall 22 and may, as shown in FIG. I, extend from ground level to the level of the roof 23. The Wall fin units 24 are prominent feature elements which interrupt the large expanse of fiat area which the exterior walls 22 would present in the absence of the wall fin units 24.

Referring to FIG. 2, the building wall fin unit 24 comprises generally U-shaped outer and inner shells 26, 28, respectively. The inner shell 28 is secured in spaced-apart relation to the outer shell 26 whereby a generally U- shaped cavity 30 is defined by the two shells 26, 28. A lightweight foamed insulating material 32 is disposed in the cavity 30 between the outer and inner shells 26, 28 for maintaining the outer and inner shells 26, 28 in the aforesaid spaced-apart relation. The building wall fin unit 24 is provided with a bracket means 33, such as structural angles 34 which are secured to the inner shell 28.

The outer shell 26 includes a base 36 and two legs 38 terminating in spaced-apart inboard longitudinal edges 40.

The inner shell 28 includes a base 42 and two legs 44 terminating in spaced-apart inboard longitudinal edges 46. The spaced-apart inboard longitudinal edges 40, 46 are secured together by suitable fastening means, such as fasteners '48.

In this embodiment of the building wall fin unit 24, the outer and inner shells 26, 28 are each formed from a single piece of material. The outer shell, being exposed, is preferably formed from an essentially maintenance free material, such as steel sheets coated with polyvinyl fluoride film, stainless steel, bronze, aluminum, porcelainenameled aluminum, and the like. The inner shell, being hidden from view, may be formed from any suitable 3 sheet metal material, such as aluminum, galvanized steel and the like.

The generally U-shaped cavity is preferably substantially entirely filled with the lightweight foamed insulating material 32. Lightweight foamed insulating materials suitable for use in the present invention includes those foamed-in-place thermal insulating materials which are produced from organic and inorganic constitutents and which have a density of less than about four pounds per cubic foot. The prefered lightweight foamed insulating material is polyurethane foam.

Referring to FIG. 3, the building wall fin unit 24 may, instead, be provided with bracket means 33, such as plate members which are secured to the inner shell 28 and having terminal mounting portions 52 which are usually coplanar.

In FIG. 4, there is shown a building wall fin unit 54 comprising generally U-shaped outer and inner shells 56, 58 secured together in spaced-apart relation to define a generally U-shaped cavity 30*. A lightweight foamed insulating material 32 is disposed within the cavity 30.

In this embodiment, the outer shell 56 is formed from plural metal sheets 60, 62 and 64 which are secured together by a recessed, non-exposed fastening means, such as seams 66. The inner shell 58 likewise is formed from plural metal sheets 68, 70 and 72 which are secured together by fasteners 74. The sheets 60, 64 of the outer shell 56 terminate in spaced-apart inboard longitudinal edges 40. The sheets 68, 72 of the inner sheel 58 likewise terminate in spaced-apart inboard longitudinal edges 46 which are engaged with the longitudinal edges 40 and secured thereto by fasteners 76.

As shown in FIG. 5, the building wall fin unit 24 can be erected by securing the angles 34 to one of the horizontal flanges 78 of a horizontal girt 80 by suitable fasteners 82.

As shown in FIG. 6, the building wall fiin units 49(54) can be erected by securing the terminal mounting portions 52 of the plate members 50 to a vertical web 84 of a horizontal girt 80 by suitable fasteners 86.

Referring again to 'FIG. 5, the building wall fin unit 24 includes a cap member 88 for at least one and preferably both of the open ends of the fin unit 24. The cap member 88 is disposed between the outer and inner shells 26, 28. The cap member 88 protects the lightweight foamed insulating material 32 against exposure to the weather.

As shown in FIG. 7, the cap member 88 may be adhesively secured to the outer and inner shells 26, 28 by a suitable adhesive '89, such as asphalts, epoxy adhesives, polyurethane sealants, et cetera.

Referring to FIG. 8, there is illustrated a butt joint between two building wall fin units 24A, 24B. The building wall fin units 24A, 24B are maintained in vertically aligned relation by alignment plates 90. The alignment plates '90, for example, are secured to the inner shell 28A of the fin unit 24A and depend therefrom into engagement with the inner shell 28B of the subjacent fin unit 24B. A sealant material 92 seals the gap between the cap members 88A, 88B.

FIG. 9 illustrates two vertically aligned building wall fin units 24C, 24D positioned to be assembled in topto-bottom overlapping relationship. In this arrangement, the outer and inner shells 26C, 28C, for example, are coterminating at their upper ends. The outer shell 26C has a fiange portion 94 extending downwardly beyond the inner shell 28C at the bottom end of the fin unit 24C for a lapping distance indicated at 96. Additionally, the outer shell 26C is inwardly recessed as at 98 at the upper end of the fin unit 24C for a distance corresponding to the lapping distance 96. As shown in FIG. 9, the subjacent wall fin unit 24D is inwardly recessed at 98. The overall arrangement is such that the two building wall fin units 24C, 24D can be assembled in top-tobottom overlapping relation. If desired, a bead 100 of sealant material may be provided along the cap member 88C of the fin unit 24C. The bead 100 will be compressed by the cap members 88C, 88D to provide an essentially weather tight seal between the two fin units 24C, 24D.

Refering again to FIG. 5, the fin unit 24 terminates in upper end 101 which may be provided with an internal closure element 102. The periphery of the closure element 102 is engaged with the inner shell 28 and is secured thereto by suitably fasteners 104.

The present building wall fin unit can be provided in the profiles of FIGS. 2, 3 and 4 and other profiles such as illustrated in FIGS. 10-13, inclusive. The building wall fin units 106, 108, and 112 have inner and outer shells 26, 28; a lightweight foamed insulating material 32 disposed between the shells 26, 28; and bracket means 33.

EXAMPLE A comparison is presented between the wall fins of this invention and the presently available pre-cast concrete wall fins in the trapezoid profile shown in 'FIG. 14.

The dimensions indicated in FIG. 14 are summarized below in Table A. It is to be noted that the pre-cast concrete wall fin has a solid trapezoidal profile whereas a wall fin of this invention has the generally U-shaped profile shown in FIG. 14. Accordingly, a pre-cast concrete wall fin has no thickness T.

Foamed insulation 1 Solid concrete. 2 Approximate.

A comparison of the Weigths of the wall fins in a typical building is given below in Table B.

TABLE B Prc-cast Wall fin concrete unit this Item wall fins invention Total linear feet 64, 000 64, 000 Weight per linear foot, p0unds 300 10 Gross weight, tons 9, 600 320 Building structural steel frame, tons 10, 000 9, 000

1 Includes weight of structural steel frame required to support the wall As can be seen from Table B, the gross Weight of the present wall fin units is only 3.3 percent of the gross weight of the pre-cast concrete wall fins. Also, the present wall fin units permits a reduction of 1,000 tons or 10 percent of the building structural steel framing which would be required if the pre-cast concrete wall fins are used.

SUMMARY The present invention provides a building wall fin unit which is lightweight when compared with the prior art pre-cast concrete wall fins; which may be produced in a variety of architectural configurations and with any of the presently available decorative coverings or surface textures; and which does not have the many disadvantages of the prior art pre-cast concrete Wall fins.

What is claimed is:

1. A building wall fin comprising:

a generally U-shaped outer shell having spaced-apart inboard longitudinal edges;

a generally U-shaped inner shell having spaced-apart inboard longitudinal edges, said inner shell being secured in spaced-apart relation to the said outer shell whereby a generally U-shaped cavity is defined by the two shells;

a lightweight foamed insulating material disposed between the said inner shell and the said outer shell for maintaining the said inner shell and the said outer shell in the said spaced-apart relation; and

bracket means secured at one end to interior faces of said inner shell and projecting at the other end away from the said inboard longitudinal edges of the said inner shell.

2. The building wall fin of claim 1 wherein the Said cavity is substantially entirely filled with said lightweight foamed insulating material.

3. The building fin of claim 1 wherein the said foamed insulating material is polyurethane foam.

4. The building wall fin of claim 1 wherein the said foamed insulating material is a foamed inorganic composition having a density of less than about four pounds per cubic foot.

5. A building wall fin comprising:

a generally U-shaped outer shell having spaced-apart inboard longitudinal edges, the said outer shell being formed from plural sheets of metal which are secured together by recessed, non-exposed fastening means;

a generally U-shaped inner shell having spaced-apart inboard longitudinal edges, said inner shell being secured in spaced-apart relation to the said outer shell whereby a generally U-shaped cavity is defined by the two shells;

a lightweight foamed insulating material disposed between the said inner shell and the said outer shell for maintaining the said inner shell and the said outer shell in the said spaced-apart relation; and

bracket means secured at one end to the said inner shell and projecting at the other end away from the said inboard longitudinal edges of the said inner shell.

6. The building wall fin of claim 1 wherein the said inner shell has opposite transverse ends, and including an internal closure member disposed at one of the said transverse ends of the said inner shell, said closure member being engaged with and secured to that face of the said inner shell remote from the said foamed insulating material.

7. A building wall fin comprising:

an elongated, generally U-shaped outer shell having spacedapart inboard longitudinal edges and opposite transverse ends;

an elongated, generally U-shaped inner shell having spaced-apart inboard longitudinal edges and opposite transverse ends, the said inner shell being secured in spaced-apart relation to the said outer shell whereby a generally U-shaped cavity is defined by the two shells, the said cavity having opposite open ends each defined by the corresponding spaced-apart transverse ends of the said inner shell and the said outer shell;

a cap member for at least one of the said open ends of the said cavity, the said cap member being disposed between the said outer shell and the said inner shell and being adhesively secured to both of said shells;

a lightweight foamed insulating material disposed between the said inner shell and the said outer shell for maintaining the said inner shell in the said spacedapart relation; and

bracket means secured at one end to the said inner shell and projecting at the other end away from the said inboard longitudinal edges of the said inner shell.

8. The building wall fin of claim 1 wherein the said outer shell is longer than the said inner shell:

the two shells being coterminating at one end of said Wall fin and the said outer shell extending beyond the said inner shell at the opposite end of said wall fin for a lapping distance; the said outer shell at said one end of said wall fin being inwardly recessed for a distance corresponding to the said lapping distance whereby two of the building wall fins can be assembled in top-to-bottom overlapping relation.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,034,709 3/ 1936 Camp 52-244 X 2,419,996 5/1947 Honikman 52-608 X 3,053,352 9/1962 Miller 52-23S X 3,084,403 4/1963 Elmendorf 52727 X 3,300,940 1/1967 Golasz 52727 X 3,350,823 11/1967 Murray 52-309 X PRICE C. FAW, 111., Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2034709 *Jan 14, 1933Mar 24, 1936Eugene V CampPost
US2419996 *Apr 3, 1946May 6, 1947Harold Honikman AlfredRoof gutter
US3053352 *Jul 7, 1961Sep 11, 1962Southern Steel CoIndicating mechanism for cell doors and locks
US3084403 *Oct 7, 1960Apr 9, 1963Elmendorf ArminRoll-wall
US3300940 *Jul 13, 1964Jan 31, 1967Paul J GolaszElongated housing
US3350823 *Oct 30, 1963Nov 7, 1967 Insulated skylight
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4541215 *Jul 11, 1983Sep 17, 1985Contour Packaging, Inc.Snap-in ceiling system
US4584807 *Sep 12, 1983Apr 29, 1986Bear Richard WComposite soffit of plastic material and furring strips
US5992125 *Jan 12, 1998Nov 30, 1999Hardy Industries, Inc.Top plate brace
US6276105 *Jan 11, 1999Aug 21, 2001Henkel CorporationLaminate reinforced beam with tapered polymer layer
WO2013083571A1 *Dec 4, 2012Jun 13, 2013European Aeronautic Defence And Space Company Eads FranceStructure for lining a wall for redirecting waves received by said wall
WO2013083572A1 *Dec 4, 2012Jun 13, 2013European Aeronautic Defence And Space Company Eads FranceAnti-reflecting lining structure with a diffraction grating using resonant elements
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/309.11, 52/311.3, 52/718.2, 52/834, D25/121
International ClassificationE04F13/12, E04B2/88, E04B2/96
Cooperative ClassificationE04F13/12, E04B2/96
European ClassificationE04B2/96, E04F13/12