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Publication numberUS3538664 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 10, 1970
Filing dateJul 1, 1968
Priority dateJul 1, 1968
Publication numberUS 3538664 A, US 3538664A, US-A-3538664, US3538664 A, US3538664A
InventorsFrandsen Le Roy, Lindner Robert G, Macleod Jack H
Original AssigneeRobertson Co H H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Prefabricated plastic building wall fin unit
US 3538664 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 10, 1970 LE ROY FRANDSEN ETAL 3,538,664

PREFABRICATED PLASTIC BUILDING WALL FIN UNIT Filed July 1, 1968 INVENTORS. LEROY FRANDEEN JOHN H. MACLEOD ROBE/Q76. L/NDNER United States Patent US. Cl. 52309 7 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the invention This invention relates to a prefabricated plastic building wall fin unit, and more particularly to'a fin unit adapted for erection with a building wall for service as an architectural column-like building feature element.

Description of the prior art Building wall fins are 'used extensively in new building structures. The wall fins project outwardly from .the exterior wall of the building and serve as prominent feature elements. The wall fins interrupt the large expanse of essentially flat wall areas and render these wall areas more attractive. The wall fins normally are non-lead bearing elements. 1

In the past, the building wall fins have comprised precast concrete elements having a white appearance.

The use of pre-cast concrete wall fins has many disad- I vantages. The weight or pre-cast concrete wall fins is great.

For example, a recently erected building incorporates a plurality of 26 feet long, pre-cast concrete wall fins having a; weight per foot of length of fin of 770 pounds or a gross weight of 10 tons each. In a proposed building, the precast concrete wall fins would have a weight per foot of length of fin of 300 pounds. The great weight of the precast concrete wall fins adds considerably to the structural steel tonnage of the building frame and to the foundation costs. Additionally, complicated wall fin-to-spandrel beam connections are required and expensive erection pro,- cedures are necessary. The use of pre-cast concrete in fins is not an efficient use of materials since the wall fins are non-load bearing elements.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The principal object of this invention is to provide a building wall fin unit which is relatively light in weight and which may be produced in a variety of architectural configurations.

Another object of this invention is to provide a building wall fin which does not have the disadvantages of the prior art precast concrete wall fins.

The present invention provides a prefabricated building wall fin comprising a generally U-shaped reinforced plastic shell having spaced-apart inboard longitudinal edges. A lath-like reinforcement, such as an expanded metal screen, may be embedded in the interior surface of the reinforced plastic shell such that surfaces thereof project from 7, 3,538,664 Patented Nov. 10, 1970 the interior of the shell. A lightweight fireproofing matcrial may be provided on the interior surface of the rein forced plastic shell and is mechanically secured thereto by the lath-like reinforcement. Bracket means having one end secured to the reinforced plastic shell project at the other end away from the inboard longitudinal edges of the reinforced plastic shell and adapt the building wall fin unit for erection to a building structural framework.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a building provided with :building wall fin units of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary isometric view illustrating the present building wall fin unit and alternative bracket means adapting the fin unit for erection to a building wall;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view, on an enlarged scale, taken along the line 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIGS. 4 and 5 are fragmentary side views illustrating typical structures for securing the present building wall fin unit to a building framework;

FIG. 6 is an exploded side view, in cross-section, illustrating a butt joint between two vertically aligned fin units of this invention;

FIG. 7 is an exploded side view, in cross-section, illustrating an oyerlapped connection between two vertically aligned fin units of this invention;

FIGS. 8-11, inclusive, are transverse cross-sectional views, illustrating alternative configurations of the present building wall fin unit;

FIG. 12 is a schematic end view of the present building wall fin unit, illustrating various dimensions; and

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary isometric view of mold apparatus employed in the manufacture of the present building wall fin unit.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT(S) FIG. 1 illustrates a building 20 having exterior walls 22 and a roof 23. Each of the exterior walls 22 is provided with a plurality of building Wall fin units 24. The wall fin units project outwardly from the exterior wall 22 and may extend from ground level to the level of the roof 23. The wall fin units 24 are prominent feature elements which interrupt the large expanse of flat area which the exterior walls 22 would present in the absence of the wall fin units 24.

Referring to FIG. 2, the present building Wall fin unit 24 comprises a generally U-shaped shell 26 fabricated from reinforced plastic and including a base 28 and two legs 30 terminating in spaced-apart inboard longitudinal edges 32. The building wall fin unit 24 is provided with bracket means 34, such as plate members 36 which are secured to the shell 26 and have terminal mounting portions 38 which are usually coplanar. Alternatively, the building wall fin unit 24 may, instead, be provided with bracket means 34, such as structural angles 40, shown in dotted outline, which are secured to the shell 26.

If desired, a lightweight fireproofing material 42 may be applied to the inner surfaces of the web 28 and the legs 30 of the building wall fin unit 24. Lightweight fireproofing materials suitable for use in the present invention include vermiculite, sprayed fibrous materials, foamed gyp sum, and the like.

Referring to FIG. 3, the shell 26 comprises a cured thermoset resinous mass 44 which engulfs and surrounds reinforcing fibers 46. If desired, a weather resistant film 48 may be secured to an exterior surface 49 of the resinous mass 44 during fabrication of the shell 26. The weather resistant film 48 may comprise polyvinyl fluoride having a thickness in the range of from 1 to 5 mils. The

film 48 constitutes the exposed surface of the building v wall fin unit 24.

Additional reinforcing means may be provided for reinforcing the shell 26. The additional reinforcing means may comprise lath material, such as an expanded metal screen 50. As can be seen in FIG. 3, the expanded metal screen 50 has surfaces 51 embedded in the resinous mass 44 and surfaces 53 projecting from the inner surface 52 of the resinous mass 44.

The lightweight fireproofing material 42 is applied to the inner surface 52 of the resinous mass 44 whereby the surfaces 53 of the expanded metal screen 50 comprise bonding and reinforcing means interposed between the lightweight fireproofing material 42 and the reinforced plastic shell 26 for mechanically bonding the fireproofing material 42 to the shell 26 and for additionally reinforcing the shell 26. The expanded metal screen 50 has surfaces 51 embedded in the reinforced plastic shell 26 and has surfaces 53 embedded in the fireproofing material 42.

The cured thermoset resinous mass 44 may comprise any suitable resinous composition including, unsaturated polyesters, epoxy and other thermosetting resins.

The reinforcing fibers 46 may comprise preformed mats of randomly oriented glass fibers. Alternatively, the reinforcing fibers may comprise short glass fibers such as provided by conventional spray techniques wherein short glass fibers and a liquid polymerizable resinous composition are simultaneously sprayed onto surfaces of a pattern or mold. Examples of other suitable reinforcing fibers include synthetic organic fibers such as polyester or polyamide fibers and the like.

As shown in FIG. 4, the building wall fin unit 24 can be erected by securing the terminal mounting portions 38 of the plate members 36 to a vertical web 54 of a horizontal girt 56 by suitable fasteners 58.

As shown in FIG. 5, the building wall fin unit 24 can be erected by securing the structural angles 40 to one of the horizontal flanges 60 of the horizontal girt 56 by suitable fasteners 62.

Referring to FIG. 6, there is illustrated a butt joint between two building wall fin units 24A, 24B. Each of the building wall fin units 24A, 24B are provided with upper and lower flanges 64, 66, respectively, which extend inwardly of the shell 26. The lower flange 64 is provided with a bead 68 and the upper flange 66 is provided with a complementary groove 70. A sealant material 72 is provided in the complementary groove 70. The head 68 and complementary groove 70 serve to maintain the building wall fin units 24A, 24B in vertically aligned relation. Moreover, engagement of the bead 68 with the sealant material 72 seals the butt joint between the building wall fin units 24A, 24B.

Referring to FIG. 7, there is illustrated two vertically aligned building wall fin units 24C, 24D positioned to be assembled in top-to-bottom overlapping relationship. In this arrangement, the shell 26 and the lightweight fireproofing material 42 are co-terminating at their upper ends. The shell 26 has a flange portion 74 extending downwardly beyond the lightweight fireproofing material 42 at the bottom end of the fin unit 240 for a lapping distance indicated at 76. Additionally, the shell 26 is inwardly recessed as at 78 at the upper end of the fin unit 240 for a distance corresponding to the lapping distance 76. As shown in FIG. 7, the subjacent wall fin unit 24D is inwardly recessed at 98. The overall arrangement is such that the two building wall fin units 24C, 24D can be assembled in top-to-bottom overlapping relation.

Referring still to FIG. 7, the upper end of the fin unit 24C may be provided with a closure element 80 having a depending flange 82. When the closure element 80 is installed, the depending flange 82 engages the exterior surface of the shell 26 in the region of the recess 78.

The lower end of the fin unit 24D also may be provided with a closure element 84 having a peripheral flange 86. When the closure element 84 is installed, the periph- 4 eral flange 86 engages the interior surface of the flange portion 74.

The closure elements 80, 84 may be adhesively secured to the shells 26 by a suitable adhesive 88. The adhesive 88 may be applied, for example, to the inner surface of the depending flange 82 of the closure element 80, and to the exterior surface of the peripheral flange 86 of the closure element 84, as illustrated in FIG. 7. Suitable adhesives include asphalts, epoxy adhesives, polyurethane sealants, et cetera. Alternatively, the closure elements 80, 84 may be secured to the shell 26 by any suitable fastener elements.

The present building wall fin unit can be provided in the profile of FIG. 2 and other profiles, such as illustrated in FIGS. 8-11, inclusive. The building wall fin units 90, 92, 94 and 96 of FIGS. 8-11, respectively, include a fiber reinforced plastic shell 26, lightweight fireproofing material 42, and expanded metal screen (not visible) securing the fireproofing material 42 to the shell 26, and bracket means 34.

EXAMPLE TABLE A Pre-caistt Wall fin concre e unit this Dimension, FIG. 14 wall fins invention Fireproofing 42- Expanded metal screen, pounds per sq. ft

1 Solid concrete.

A comparison of the weights of the wall fins in a typical building is given below in Table B.

TABLE 13 Pre-cast Wall fin concrete unit this Item wall fins invention Total linear feet 64, 000 64, 000 Weight per linear foot, pounds 300 1 10.6 Gross weight, tons 9, 600 339 Bulldmg structural steel frame, tons 10, 000 9, 000

1 Based on the average density of the shell 26 material and of the Tireproofing material 42.

2 Includes weight of structural steel frame required to support the wall METHOD Referring to FIG. 13, there is illustrated a pattern or mold 98 for producing the wall fin unit 24 of FIG. 2. The pattern 98 has a trough-like configuration including a bottom wall 100, diverging side walls 102, 104 and end walls 106 (only one shown). The bottom wall 100 and the diverging side walls 102, 104 may have plain interior surfaces or may have interior surfaces which are textured to correspond with the texture of various materials, such as concrete, for example.

In accordance with one embodiment of the present method of making prefabricated plastic building wall fin units, the reinforcing fibers 46, in the form of preformed mats of randomly oriented reinforcing fibers, are applied to the interior surfaces of the walls #100, 102 and 104 of the pattern 98. A liquid thermosetting resinous composition is applied to the preformed mats in a quantity sufficient to engulf and surround the same. The liquid thermosetting resinous composition is allowed to cure partially and thereafter, the lath material 50 is applied to the exposed surfaces of the partially cured thermosetting resinous composition, such that the lath material 50 is partially embedded in the partially cured thermosetting resinous composition. The partially cured resinous composition, the preformed mats of randomly oriented reinforcing fibers and the lath material are retained in assembled relation within the pattern until the resinous composition has substantially completely cured.

After the thermosetting resinous composition has cured, a layer of lightweight fireproofing material (not shown) may be applied to the interior surfaces of the shell 26. The lightweight fireproofing material is mechanically bonded to the thermosetting resinous composition by embedment of the exposed portions of the lath material 50 in the fireproofing material.

In accordance with an alternative embodiment of the present method of making prefabricated plastic building wall fin units, the reinforcing fibers 46 and liquid thermosetting resinous composition are applied simultaneously to the pattern 98 by conventional spraying techniques. In this instance, short lengths of reinforcing fibers are sprayed along with a stream of liquid thermosetting resinous composition against the pattern 98, whereby the resin-coated reinforcing fibers are arrayed in random orientation.

If desired, a film of weather resistant material, such as the film 48 (FIG. 3) may be applied to the interior surfaces of the walls 100, 102 and 104 of the pattern 98 prior to the application of the reinforcing fibers 46 and the liquid thermosetting resinous composition. In this instance, the film also serves as a mold release agent.

The shell 26 may be formed from thermosetting resinous compositions of various colors. The resulting building wall fin may have a color which blends with the color of the building or may have a contrasting color to render the building wall fins more prominent. Furthermore, the thermosetting resinous composition may have a mottled color or pattern to produce a surface appearance in imitation of marble. An appearance simulating that of white concrete may be achieved by suitable white pigmentation of the plastic substance.

SUMMARY The present invention provides a building wall fin unit which is lightweight when compared with the prior art pre-cast concrete wall fins; which may be produced in a variety of architectural configurations and in any of a variety of colors; which may be produced with a plain or a textured surface in imitation of marble, concrete or the like; and which does not have the many disadvantages of the prior art pre-cast concrete wall fins.

What is claimed is:

1. A building wall in fin unit comprising:

a generally U-shaped shell having spaced-apart legs presenting spaced-apart inboard longitudinal edges, said generally U-shaped shell being formed from fiber reinforced plastics; and

bracket members secured at one end away from said spaced-apart legs and projecting at the other end away from said inboard longitudinal edges of said shell, said bracket members being discrete from said 'U-shaped shell.

2. The building wall fin unit of claim 1 wherein said fiber-reinforced plastics contains performed mats of glass fibers.

3. The building wall fin unit of claim 1 wherein said fiber-reinforced plastics contains randomly oriented short glass fibers.

4. A building wall fin unit comprising:

a generally U-shaped shell having spaced-apart inboard longitudinal edges, said generally U-shaped shell being formed from fiber reinforced plastics;

an expanded metal screen applied to the interior surfaces of said generally U-shaped shell and substantially coextensive in area therewith, said expanded metal screen having surfaces embedded in the said reinforced plastics and having surfaces projecting from the said reinforced plastics; and

bracket means secured at one end to said shell and projecting at the other end away from the said inboard longitudinal edges of said shell.

5. A building wall fin unit comprising:

a generally U-shaped shell having spaced-apart inboard longitudinal edges, said generally U-shaped shell formed from fiber reinforced plastics;

bracket means secured at one end to said shell and projecting at the other end away from said inboard longitudinal edges of said shell;

a lightweight fireproofing material applied to the interior surfaces of said generally U-shaped shell; and

bonding and reinforcing means interposed between said lightweight fireproofing material and said shell for mechanically bonding said lightweight fireproofing material to said shell and for reinforcing said shell.

6. The building Wall fin unit of claim 5 wherein said bonding and reinforcing means comprises a lath material having surfaces embedded in the said reinforced plastics and having surfaces embedded in said lightweight fireproofing material.

7. The building wall fin unit of claim 5 wherein the said shell and the said lightweight fireproofing material are co-terminating at one end of said wall fin unit and said shell extends beyond the said lightweight fireproofing material at the opposite end of said wall fin unit for a lapping distance;

the said shell at said one end of said wall fin unit being inwardly recessed for a distance corresponding to the said lapping distance whereby two of the building wall fins can be assembled in top-to-bottom overlapping relation.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,913,779 11/1959 Hedgren 52495 X 2,148,281 2/1939 Scott 52454 2,419,996 5/1947 Honikman 52-608 X 3,182,766 5/1965 Ferrell 52235 X 3,213,570 10/1965 Abramson 52-309 X 3,300,940 1/1967 Golasz 52-727 X PCRICE C. FAW, 111., Primary Examiner 11.8. C1. Xfll.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2148281 *Oct 22, 1937Feb 21, 1939Bird Archer CoInsulating structure
US2419996 *Apr 3, 1946May 6, 1947Harold Honikman AlfredRoof gutter
US2913779 *Apr 29, 1957Nov 24, 1959Hedgren Arthur WWindow and like structures
US3182766 *Feb 20, 1962May 11, 1965Robertson Co H HTrim cap structure for a curtain wall mullion
US3213570 *Sep 12, 1962Oct 26, 1965Jr Louis AbramsonPlastic bench-seats
US3300940 *Jul 13, 1964Jan 31, 1967Paul J GolaszElongated housing
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3853418 *Feb 28, 1973Dec 10, 1974Celanese CorpSafety support for use adjacent a vehicular trafficway
US4242406 *Apr 30, 1979Dec 30, 1980Ppg Industries, Inc.Fiber reinforced composite structural laminate composed of two layers tied to one another by embedded fibers bridging both layers
US4281493 *Apr 27, 1977Aug 4, 1981Pitt William VAtmospheric resistant doors
US4374693 *Apr 30, 1981Feb 22, 1983Pitt William VMethod of manufacturing atmospheric resistant doors
US5379557 *Oct 8, 1993Jan 10, 1995Rodman W. KotterArchitectual panel system for geodesic-like structures
US5491309 *Oct 4, 1993Feb 13, 1996Quilite International Limited Liability CompanyAcoustical panel system
US5641950 *Aug 23, 1995Jun 24, 1997Quilite International Limited Liability CompanyAcoustical panel system
US5992125 *Jan 12, 1998Nov 30, 1999Hardy Industries, Inc.Top plate brace
US6490828Jul 20, 2000Dec 10, 2002Steelcase Development CorporationPartition wall system
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/309.13, 52/718.1, 52/311.3, 52/834
International ClassificationE04B2/88, E04B2/96
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2/96
European ClassificationE04B2/96