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Publication numberUS3541142 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 17, 1970
Filing dateSep 2, 1966
Priority dateSep 2, 1966
Publication numberUS 3541142 A, US 3541142A, US-A-3541142, US3541142 A, US3541142A
InventorsEdward J Cragoe Jr
Original AssigneeMerck & Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
(4-(2-hydroxymethylalkanoyl)phenoxy) acetic acids
US 3541142 A
Abstract  available in
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

; trated sulfuric acid, para-toluenesulfonic acid monohyaration:

' wherein R is hydrogen, alkyl, for example, lower alkyl 7 such as methyl, ethyl, propyl, isopropyl, butyl, pentyl United States Patent 3,541,142 [4-(2-HYDROXYMETHYLALKANOYL)- PHENOXY] ACETIC ACIDS Edward J. Cragoe, Jr., Lansdale, Pa., assignor to Merck & Co., Inc., Rahway, NJ., a corporation of New 5' Jersey No Drawing. Filed Sept. 2, 1966, Ser. No. 576,854 Int. Cl. C07c 63/36 US. Cl. 260-521 6 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE r of formaldehyde in the presence of an acid.

This invention relates to a new method for the preparation of [4-(Z-methylenealkanoyl)phenoxy] acetic acids and to the nontoxic, pharmacologically acceptable salts, esters and amide derivatives thereof.

Pharmacological studies show that the instant products are effective diuretic and saluretic agents which can be used in the treatment of conditions associated with electrolyte and fluid retention and hypertension. When administered in therapeutic dosages, in conventional vehicles, the instant products effectively reduce the amount of sodium and chloride ions in the body, lower dangerous excesses of fluid levels to acceptable limits and, in general alleviate conditions associated with edema.

Also included within this invention are the [4-[2- (hydroxymethyl)alkanoyl]phenoxy]acetic acid precursors from which the [4-(2-methylenealkanoyl)phenoxy]acetic acid products are obtained. In addition to their utility as intermediates the said [4-[2-(hydroxymethyl)alkanoyl]phenoxy]acetic acids also exhibit diuretic activity and, therefore, are also useful in the treatment of conditions associated with electrolyte and fluid retention.

The process of this invention comprises treating a [4-[2-(hydroxymethyl)alkanoyl]phenoxy]acetic acid (II, infra) with an acidic reagent capable of eliminating water therefrom. In general, any acid may be used to effect the elimination, it only being necessary to render the reaction mixture sufficiently acidic so as to effect the elimination of water. However, it has been found that the reagent employed should be of sufiicient strength as to be amoderately strong or strong acid. Typical of the acids which may be employed include, for example, concendrate, methanesulfonic acid etc., and Lewis Acids such as boron trifluoride, etc.

The following equation illustrates this method of prep- O CHz-C O OH etc. or trifluoromethyl substituted lower alkyl, for example 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl, 2,2,2-trifluoroisopropyl, etc.; the X radicals are similar or dissimilar members selected from hydrogen, halogen, lower alkyl, lower alkoxy or, taken together, two X radicals on adjacent carbon atoms of the benzene ring may be joined to form an hydrocarbylene chain (i.e., a divalent organic radical composed solely of carbon and hydrogen) containing from 3-4 carbon atoms between their points of attachment, for example, trimethylene, tetramethylene, 1,3-butadienylene (i.e., -CH=CHCH=CH-), etc., and n is an integer having a value of 1-2.

A preferred embodiment of this invention comprises the elimination of water from a [2,3-disubstituted-4-[2-(hydroxymethyl)alkanoyl]phenoxy]acetic acid (Ha, infra) by treatment with a strong acid according to the following equation to obtain a corresponding [2,3-disubstituted- 4-(Z-methylenebutyryl)phenoxy]acetic acid (Ia, infra):

wherein R is lower alkyl and X and X are similar or dissimilar members selected from hydrogen, halogen or lower alkyl. The foregoing class of compounds exhibits particularly good diuretic and saluretic activity and represents a preferred subgroup within the scope of this invention.

The instant [4-.(Z-methylenealkanoyl)phenoxy]acetic acid products (I) are generally obtained as crystalline solids and, if desired, may be purified by recrystallization from a suitable solvent or from a mixture of solvents as for example, from carbon tetrachloride, butyl chloride, benzene, cyclohexane, etc. or from mixtures thereof.

The [4-[2- (hydroxymethyl) alkanoyl] phenoxy] acetic acid starting materials (II) of the instant process are conveniently obtained by the reaction of an appropriate (4-alkanoylphenoxy)acetic acid (III, infra) with an aqueous solution of formaldehyde or with its functional equivalent as, for example, with paraformaldehyde, trioxane, etc., in the presence of an acid and, preferably, in a suitable solvent such as dioxane. The reaction is most advantageously conducted with the application of heat as, for example, by heating at the reflux temperature of the reaction mixture over extended periods. The following equation illustrates this method of preparation:

I Acid RCHz-CO- OOH2COOH (CHgO);

III )n RCH-CO- --O OH1GO OH CHzOH H wherein R, X and n are as defined above and x is an integer having the value of l or a number greater than 1.

Usually, it is convenient to generate the [4-[2-(hydroxymethyl)alkanoyl]phenoxy]acetic acid (II) in situ, i.e., by proceeding directly from the (4-alkanoylphenoxy) acetic acid precursor (III) to the [4-(2-methylenealkanoyl)phenoxy]acetic acid product (I) without isolating the hydroxylated intermediate (II). The advantage to such an in situ formation resides in the fact that the optimum conditions employed in the preparation of the [4-[2-(hydroxymethyl)alkanoyl] phenoxy1acetic acids (II) are also the optimal conditions for converting the said intermediates (II) to their corresponding final products (I); however, making it difificult to isolate the said intermediates (II). In fact, under selected conditions of temperature and acidity, as described in some of the following examples, the conversion of the intermediates (II) to their corresponding final products (I) is so rapid that the amount of intermediate (II) in the reaction mixture at any time is appreciably small.

Included within this invention is the preparation of the nontoxic, pharmacologically acceptable salts of the instant products (I). In general, any base which will form an acid addition salt with the said [4-(2-methylenealkanoyl)phenoxy]acetic acid products (I) and whose pharmacological properties will not cause an adverse physiological effect when ingested by the body system, is considered as being within the scope of this invention; suitable bases thus include, for example, the alkali metal and alkaline earth metal hydroxides, carbonates, etc., ammonia, primary, secondary and tertiary amines such as monoalkylamines, dialkylamines, trialkylamines, nitrogen containing heterocyclic amines, for example, piperidine, etc.

This invention also relates to the preparation of ester and amide derivatives of the instant products (I) and includes all such derivatives as are compatible with the body system and whose pharmacological properties will not cause an adverse physiological efifect. Esters and amides within the scope of this invention include, for example, the alkyl ester, the dialkylaminoalkyl ester and the amide, the N-alkyl amide, the N-(dialkylaminoalkyl) amide and the N-heterocyclic amide derivatives as, for example, amides derived from such heterocyclic amines as pyrrolidine, piperidine, morpholine, etc.; which esters and amides are prepared according to the process of the invention from the corresponding ester and amide derivatives of the [4 [2 (hydroxymethyl)alkanoyl]phenoxy]acetic acid starting materials which, in turn, are obtained from the corresponding ester and amide derivatives of the (4- alkanoylphenoxy)acetic acid precursors.

The foregoing and other equivalent methods for the preparation of the ester and amide derivatives of the instant products will be apparent to those having ordinary skill in the art and, to the extent that the said derivatives are both nontoxic and physiologically acceptable to the body system, the said esters and amides are the functional equivalents of the corresponding [4-(2-methylenealkanoyl) phenoxy] acetic acids (I).

The examples which follow illustrate the [4-(2-methylenealkanoyl)phenoxy]acetic acid products (I) and [4- [Z-(hydroxymethyl)alkanoyl]phenoxy]acetic acid starting materials (II) of this invention and the methods by which they are prepared. However, the examples are illustrative only and it will be apparent to those having ordinary skill in the art that all of the products embraced by Formula I, supra, may be prepared in an analogous manner, by substituting the appropriate starting materials for those set forth in the examples.

EXAMPLE 1 [2,3-dichloro-4-(2-methylenebutyryl)phenoxy]acetic acid A mixture of (2,3-dichloro-4-butyrylphenoxy)acetic acid (11.6 g., 0.04 mole), paraformaldehyde (4.88 g., 0.163 mol equiv.), p-toluenesulfonic acid monohydrate (7.6 g., 0.04 mole) and dioxane (100 ml.) is mechanically stirred and heated on a steam bath for hours. The internal temperature of the reaction mixture is 86 C.

By removing a small sample of the reaction mixture at periodic intervals the presence of the intermediate [2,3- dichloro 4 [2-(hydroxymethyl)butyryl]phenoxy] acetic acid can be demonstrated by thin layer chromatography and infra red spectroscopy.

The solvent is removed at reduced pressure using a rotary evaporator and the residue is dissolved in dichloromethane and washed with water. The organic phase is dried over magnesium sulfate and the solvent removed in a rotary evaporator. The solid residue, 9.2 g. (76%), is identified as [2,3-dichloro 4 (2 methylenebutyryl)phenoxy]acetic acid. Repeated recrystallization from carbon tetrachloride yields a purified product which melts at 124 125 C.

EXAMPLE 2 [2,3-dichloro-4-(2-methylenebutyryl) phen0xy]acetic acid The reaction is carried out as in Example 1 except that the p-toluenesulfonic acid monohydrate is replaced by concentrated sulfuric acid (4 g., 0.08 mole equiv.) and the heating time is seven hours. The yield of once crystallized [2,3-dichloro-4-(Z-methylenebutyryl)phenoxy]acetic acid is 5.1 g. (42%). Further recrystallization gives a purified product which melts at 124-125 C.

EXAMPLE 3 [2,3-dichloro-4-(2-methylenebutyryl)phenoxy] acetic acid The reaction is carried out as in Example 1 except that the paraformaldehyde is replaced by trioxane (4.88 g., 0.16 mol equiv.), the p-toluenesulfonic acid monohydrate is replaced by concentrated sulfuric acid (2 g., 0.04 mol equiv.) and the reaction mixture is heated for 11 /2 hours. The yield of once recrystallized [2,3-dichloro-4-(2-methylenebutyryl)phenoxy1acetic acid is 6.5 g. (54%). Further recrystallization from carbon tetrachloride yields a purified product which melts at 124125 C.

EXAMPLE 4 [2,3-dichloro-4-( Z-methylenebutyryl)phenoxy] acetic acid The reaction is carried out as in Example 3 except that the trioxane is replaced by 38% aqueous formaldehyde (12.64 g., 0.16 mol. equiv.) and the reaction time is 25 hours. The yield of once recrystallized [2,3-dichloro-4-(2- methylenebutyryl)phenoxy]acetic acid is 6.45 g. (53%). Further recrystallization yields a purified product which melts at 124-125 C.

EXAMPLE 5 [2,3-dichloro-4- Z-methylenebutyryl phenoxy] acetic acid The reaction is carried out as in Example 2 except that the amount of concentrated sulfuric acid is (2 g., 0.04 mol. equiv.) instead of (4 g., 0.08 mol. equiv.) and the heating time is 11 /2 hours. The yield of once recrystallized [2,3-dichloro-4-(Z-methylenebutyryl) phenoxy] acetic acid is 6.5 g. (54%). Further recrystallization yields a purified product which melts at 124-125 C.

EXAMPLE 6 [2,3-dichloro-4-(2-methylenebutyryl)phenoxy] acetic acid The reaction is carried out as in Example 1 except that p-toluenesulfonic acid monohydrate is replaced by boron trifiuoride etherate (5.68 g., 0.04 mole) and the heating time is seven hours. The [2,3-dichloro-4-(2-methylenebutyryl)phenoxy]acetic acid thus obtained melts at 124- 125 C. after several recrystallizations.

In a manner similar to that described in Example 1, supra, for the preparation of [2,3-dichloro-4-(Z-methylenebutyryl)phenoxy]acetic acid, all of the [4-(2-methylenealkanoyl)phenoxy]acetic acid products (I) of this invention may be obtained. Thus, by substituting the appropriate (4-alkanoylphenoxy)acetic acid for the (2,3-dichloro-4-butyrylphenoxy)acetic acid of Example 1 and employing paraformaldehyde or its functional equivalent and following substantially the procedure described in Example 1, all of the [4-(2-methylenealkanoyl)phenoxy] acetic acid products and [4-[2-(hydroxymethyl)alkanoyl] phenoxy]acetic acid intermediates of this invention may be synthesized. The following equation illustrates the reaction of Example 1 and, together with Table I (infra),

depict the starting materials of the process and the corresponding products and intermediates obtained therefrom:

The [2,3-dichloro 4 (2-methylenebutyryDphenoxy] acetic acid is reduced to a No. 60 powder and then lactose and magnesium stearate are passed through a No.

I I Add 60 bolting cloth onto the powder and the combined in- RCHPOO CHPCOOH (01120); gredients admixed for minutes and then filled into No.

A 3 dry gelatin capsules. IIIa 1'6 X Similar dry-filled capsules can be prepared by replacing 21c active ingredient of the above example by any of GHQ-C0011 the other novel compounds of this invention.

03,03 in) 10 It will be apparent from the foregoing that the [4-(2- methylenealkanoyDphenoxy] acetic acid products (I), the Acidl [4 ll (hydroxymethyl)alkanoyl]phenoxy]acetic acid X3 X2 intermediates (II), and the nontoxic, pharmacologically r acceptable salts, esters and amide derivatives thereof, constitute a valuable class of compounds which have 311 not been prepared heretofore. One skilled in the art will 2 1b also appreciate that the processes disclosed in the above TABLE I R 2 X1 (orno) M.P., 0., lb

.43 11 H 01 Paraiormaldehyde 109-111 CH --CH3 Trioxane 83. 5-84. 5 C2H5 CH=CHCH=CH 38% aqueous formaldehyde..." 106-100 H 01 Trioxane 122. 5423.5 2 5 C1 CH3 Paraformaldehyde 89411 11 -CH 01 38% aqueous formaldeh 113-114 OH (CH3); C1 C1 Paraformaldehyde 139-140 -OCHa o 110-111-.5 0H3 H Trioxane 124. 5426. 5 OH, CF3 -CH3 -CH3 Paraformaldehyde 82-84 CH(CH3)(CF3) H -C a d0 6- 18 (32 5 CH2CH2CH2- 38% aqueous formaldehyde... 80-82 C2H5 --CH OH -CH2CH- Paraformaldehyde 89%91 The products of this invention can be administered in a wide variety of therapeutic dosages in conventional vehicles as, for example, by oral administration in the form of a capsule or tablet as well as by intravenous injection. Also, the dosage of the products may be varied over a wide range as, for example, in the form of capsules or scored tablets containing 5, 10, 20, 25, 50, 100, 150, 250 and 500 milligrams, i.e., from 5 to about 500 milligrams, of the active ingredient for the symptomatic adjustment of the dosage to the patient to be treated. These dosages are well below the toxic or lethal dose of the products.

A suitable unit dosage form for the instant products can be prepared by mixing 50 mg. of a [4-(2-methylenealkanoyDphenoxy] acetic acid or a nontoxic, pharmacologically acceptable salt, ester or amide derivative thereof with 144 mg. of lactose and 6 mg. of magnesium stearate and placing the 200 mg. mixture into a No. 3 gelatin capsule. Similarly, by employing more of the active ingredient and less lactose, other dosage forms can be put up in No. 3 gelatin capsules and should it be necessary to mix more than 200 mg. of ingredients together, larger capsules may be employed. Compressed tablets, pills or other desired unit dosages can be prepared to incorporate the compounds of this invention by conventional methods and, if desired, can be made up as elixirs or as injectable solutions by methods well known to pharmacists.

It is also within the scope of this invention to combine two or more of the compounds of this invention in a unit dosage form or to combine one or more of the compounds with other known diuretics and saluretics or with other desired therapeutic and/ or nutritive agents in dosage unit form.

The following example is included to illustrate the preparation of a representative dosage form:

EXAMPLE acid 50 Lactose 144 Magnesium stearate 6 Capsule size No. 3 200 examples are merely illustrative and are capable of wide variation and modification without departing from the spirit of this invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A compound having the formula:

-O CHz-CO OH wherein R is alkyl or trifiuoromethyl substituted lower alkyl; the X radicals are similar or dissimilar members selected from hydrogen, halogen, lower alkyl, lower alkoxy or, taken together, two X radicals on adjacent carbon atoms of the benzene ring may be joined to form an hydrocarbylene chain selected from trimethylene, tetramethylene 0r 1,3-butadienylene; and n is an integer having a value of 1-2; and the nontoxic, pharmacologically acceptable salts, alkyl esters, dialkylaminoalkyl esters and amide, N-alkyl amide, N-(dialkylaminoalkyDamide, pyrrolidide, piperidide or morpholide derivatives thereof.

2. A compound having the formula:

X X I won-ooQ-o CHz-COOH CHzOH 6. [3-ch1oro 4 [2-(hydroxymethy1)butyry1]phenoxy] OTHER REFERENCES acct: acld' Morrison et 211., Organic Chemistry, Allyn & Bacon,

References Clted Boston, 1959, pp. 115,338. UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,130,592 9/1938 McAllister et a1. 260594 5 LORRAINE A-WEINBERGEKPHWYY Exammer 1,955,060 3/1934 Flemming et al. 260-594 D. E. STENZEL, Assistant Examiner 3,364,255 1/1968 Cragoe 260520 U.S. c1. X.R. FOREIGN PATENTS 10 260247.7, 294.7, 326.5, 473, 501.16, 520, 559; 424

513,772 10/1939 Great Britain. 308, 317, 324

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Classifications
U.S. Classification562/464, 562/462, 514/869, 560/53, 546/192, 544/171, 564/169, 548/540, 250/396.00R
International ClassificationC07C51/353, C07C51/377, C07C59/88, C07C59/90
Cooperative ClassificationC07C59/90, Y10S514/869, C07C51/353, C07C59/88, C07C51/377
European ClassificationC07C51/377, C07C51/353, C07C59/90, C07C59/88