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Publication numberUS3541610 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 24, 1970
Filing dateSep 13, 1968
Priority dateSep 13, 1968
Publication numberUS 3541610 A, US 3541610A, US-A-3541610, US3541610 A, US3541610A
InventorsGettinger Lillian L
Original AssigneeGettinger Lillian L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Head scarf
US 3541610 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov 24, 1970 L. L. GETTINGER 3,541,610

HEAD SCARF Filed Sept. 15, 1968 ywwm United States Patent ice 3,541,610 HEAD SCARF Lillian L. Gettinger, 2509 Shelley Dale Drive, Baltimore, Md. 21209 Filed Sept. 13, 1968, Ser. No. 759,600 Int. Cl. A4211 1/06; A41d 23/00 US. Cl. 2-203 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A head scarf especially suitable for covering boutfant hairdos to protect them from the weather elements is disclosed. The head scarf has a broad visor and a fitted back with long tie ends, thereby providing protection for the entire coitfiure.

This invention relates to head coverings, particularly to a head scarf of the type to be worn by a woman to protect her coiffure from the effects of the weather elements without disturbing or crushing her hairdo. More particularly, this invention relates to a head scarf which has a broad visor and fitted back to protect the entire coiffure of the wearer as well as shielding the forehead, or any forwardly extending portion of the coiffure, from the weather elements.

Head scarves of various sizes, shapes and appearances are well known for protecting womens hair from the effects of wind, rain, sleet, snow and other adverse weather conditions. The head scarves already in use take various forms and configurations. For instance, one type of head scarf is made of a single panel which essentially covers the hair in a manner quite like the old-fashioned kerchief. Another type of head scarf which is in use includes a broad visor for protecting the wearers forehead and the forward portion of her coilfure. Additionally, that head scarf is shirred in the rear so that it gently encloses the coiifure without damaging the same. Certain types of bouffant hairdos, however, can not be enclosed by such a head scarf but must be protected in such a manner that no crushing or other physical damage occurs. This requires a head scarf of a totally different construction which allows that freedom from constriction so necessary in highfashion hairdos.

Accordingly, it is a primary object of the present invention to provide a head scarf which provides complete Weather protection for a coiffure without crushing the same.

Another primary object of the present invention is to provide a head scarf which affords protection to the overall hairdo of the wearer while maintaining an attractive appearance.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a head scarf which can be quickly, easily, and inexpensively manufactured, yet which is attractive and fashionable and which enhances the appearance of the wearer.

Yet another object of the present invention, consistent with the foregoing objects, is to provide a head scarf which, while protecting the wearers coiffure from the weather elements without crushing or damaging the same, can yet be tied snugly beneath the wearers chin to prevent displacement or slippage.

Other objects, advantages and salient features of the present invention will become apparent from the following detailed description which, taken in connection with the annexed drawings, discloses a preferred embodiment thereof.

In order to implement the foregoing and other objects of this invention there is provided a head scarf which has a body portion formed of a wall section and a crown section, and a visor portion. The wall section is formed of a flat elongate wall panel having a generally linear forward edge 3,541,610 Patented Nov. 24, 1970 and a concavely arcuate rear edge joined to the forward edge by substantially linear angled side edges extending outwardly and forwardly from the rear edge to the forward edge. The crown section has a substantially linaer rear edge and a convexly arcuate forward edge. The forward edge of the crown section is joined to the rear edge of the wall section by conventional means such as stitching. The visor portion is generally semi-oval, with a substantially linear forward edge and a convexly arcuate rear edge. The rear edge of the visor portion is joined to the forward edge of the wall section at a central location thereof, also by conventional means. The result of this construction is the formation of a head scarf which snugly encircles the sides and top of the coitfure while safely protecting the rear of the same. The lower edge of the head scarf is generally horizontally concavely arcuate so that it tapers downwardly and-forwardly from the rear with the ends of the wall section providing tie members to be secured under the wearers chin. The visor portion, of course, protects the forward portion of the coiifure and the forehead. The head scarf is constructed of any suitable material, with the preferred material being a flexible mesh material superimposed upon a flexible water impervious plastic film. In the preferred embodiment the material used is a nylon chiffon bonded to clear vinyl.

Referring to the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of the blank of the wall section;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the blank of the crown section;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the visor portion;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of the blank utilized to form decorative petals for the head scarf of the present invention;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the inventive head scarf; and

FIG. 6 is a side elevational view of the head scraf of FIG. 5 applied over the head of a wearer.

Referring first to FIG. 1, the blank generally designated 10 of the wall section is a flat elongate panel. Blank 10 has a substantially linear forward edge 12 and a concavely arcuate rear edge 14 which is shorter than forward edge 12. Generally linear angled side edges 16 and 18 join forward edge 12 and rear edge 14. Side edges 16 and 18 are angled inwardly and rearwardly from forward edge 12 and rear edge 14.

The crown section blank, generally designated 20, has a substantially linear rear edge 22 and a convexly arcuate forward edge 24 extending outwardly and forwardly from rear edge 22. Visor portion 26 shown in FIG. 3 is semioval, with a substantially linear forward edge 28 and a convexly arcuate rearward edge 30.

As can be seen from FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, the blanks 10, 20, and 26 are formed of a flexible mesh material 11, 21, and 27, respectively, and a moisture-impervious plastic mate rial 13, 23 and 29, respectively, coextensive with the blanks.

Now having described the blanks 10, 20 and 26, of which the inventive head scarf is made, attention is directed to FIG. 5 wherein the overall construction is shown. The crown section 20 is secured to the body section 10 by conventional means such as stitching. The forward edge 24 of crown section 20 is located centrally along the rear edge 14 of the body section 10 and stitched thereto, thereby forming seam 32. The construction automatically provides the proper contour for the head scarf to rest comfortably and safely on the wearers head. When the head scarf is in use the side edges 16 and 18 and rear edge 22 of crown section 20 form a continuous lower edge generally designated 40 of the head scarf. The lower edge 40 is slightly concavely arcuate so that end portions 42 and 44 can encircle the neck and tie beneath the wearers chin without causing any dishevelment.

Next, visor portion 26 is secured to body section 10, also by conventional means. The arcuate rear edge 30 of visor portion 26 is juxtaposed with forward edge 12 of body section 10, in a central location thereof, and stitching applied thereto, thereby forming seam 46.

While the construction just described represents the preferred embodiment of this invention in its most basic sense, certain finishing touches are applied to increase the strength and durability of the head scarf while at the same time enhancing its attractiveness. At seam 32, for ina stance, the front edge 24 of crown section 20 and rear edge 14 of wall section are superimposed and then slightly folded over upon themselves. A narrow strip of mesh is applied thereover and then stitching is applied. The same procedure is followed along lower edge 40 to provide the continuous seam 48 which encompasses side edges 16 and 18 and rear edge 22. Forward edge 28 of visor portion 26 is then slightly folded over upon itself, a narrow strip of mesh applied thereover and stitching applied thereto to form finishing seam 50. Finally, forward edge 12 of body section 10 is slightly folded over upon itself, and where rear edge 30 of visor portion 26 is superimposed upon forward edge 12 of body section 10, that also is slightly folded over upon itself. A narrow strip of mesh is applied thereover and stitching applied thereto to form the long continuous seam 52. It should be clear that while the construction has been described by reference to a particular sequence of steps, no limitation on the scope of' the invention should be inferred therefrom.

FIG. 4 depicts a blank 54 for a decorative petal which can be applied to the inventive head scarf to provide a decorative effect, while serving to hide the seam 46, as shown in FIG. 6.

Thus, it can be seen that the objects set forth at the outset of the specification have been successfully achieved. Moreover, while there is shown and described a present preferred embodiment of the invention, it is to be distinctly understood that the invention is not limited thereto, but may be otherwise variously embodied and practiced within the scope of the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A bouffant head scarf comprising a body portion formed of a wall section and a crown section, and a visor section; said wall section being formed of a flat elongate wall panel having a generally linear forward edge, a concavely arcuate rear edge and a substantilly liner angled side edges extending inwardly and rearwardly from said forward edge to said rear edge; said crown section being formed of a fiat panel having a substantially linear rear edge, a convexly arcuate forward edge, and linear side edges connecting together the end extremities of said linear rear edge and said convexly arcuate forward edge,

one end of said crown section defined in part by said linear rear edge having a wider dimension than the other end defined by said convexly arcuate forward edge; said convexly arcuate forward edge including the linear side edges of said crown section being joined to said rear edge of said wall section, said rear edge of said crown section together with said side edges of said wall section forming a neck-encircling bottom edge of said bouffant head scarf with end extremities of said wall section defining elongated tie means for securing said boulfant head scarf about a wearers head; said visor portion being generally semi-oval in shape, with a substantially linear forward edge and a convexly arcuate rear edge; said rear edge of said visor portion being substantially smaller in length than the length of said forward edge of said wall section and joined at a central location thereof; said wall section, crown section and visor portion each being formed of a flexible mesh material, and with a moistureimpervious flexible plastic material coextensive with said wall, crown, and visor sections.

2. A head scarf as defined in claim 1, wherein a linear length of said rear edge of said wall section is substantially equal to a linear length of said forward edge of said crown section.

3. A head scarf as defined in claim 1, wherein said neck-encircling bottom edge is generally arcuate.

4. A head scarf as defined in claim 1, further comprising a first stitched seam along the joint of said forward edge of said crown section and the rear edge of said wall section, and a second stitched seam along the joint of said rear edge of said visor portion and said forward edge of said wall section.

5. A head scarf as defined in claim 4, further comprising a plurality of petal-shaped members secured over said second seam, thereby obscuring said second seam from view.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,089,995 8/1937 Dobbs 2193 2,491,183 12/1949 Jones 2-186 3,179,954 4/1965 Weitzner 2186 XR 3,376,581 4/1968 Gettinger 2209.l

FOREIGN PATENTS 641,353 5/1962 Canada.

JORDAN FRANKLIN, Primary Examiner G. H. KRIZMANICH, Assistant Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R. 2-207

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2089995 *Nov 5, 1936Aug 17, 1937Dobbs Ernestine HSport cap
US2491183 *Jun 7, 1947Dec 13, 1949Jones Archdale JHat trimming device
US3179954 *Sep 3, 1963Apr 27, 1965Weitzner Dorothea MConvertible plastic frame cap
US3376581 *Aug 18, 1967Apr 9, 1968Lillian L. GettingerCape-type head covering
CA641353A *May 15, 1962Andre FantasiesHead covering
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4110846 *May 20, 1977Sep 5, 1978Robert HernandezCombined scarf and hood
US5083318 *May 24, 1990Jan 28, 1992Hook Chalanda MHeadwrap for chemotherapy patients
US5365613 *Jun 18, 1993Nov 22, 1994Kymmania EnterprisesHair drying towel turban
US8516619 *Nov 4, 2009Aug 27, 2013Mohammad Mubde AbsiReady to wear headscarf
US20120291181 *Nov 4, 2009Nov 22, 2012Mohammad Mubde AbsiReady To Wear Headscarf
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/203, D02/874, 2/207
International ClassificationA42B1/04
Cooperative ClassificationA42B1/045
European ClassificationA42B1/04C