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Publication numberUS3541749 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 24, 1970
Filing dateSep 20, 1968
Priority dateSep 20, 1968
Publication numberUS 3541749 A, US 3541749A, US-A-3541749, US3541749 A, US3541749A
InventorsTroutner Arthur L
Original AssigneeTroutner Arthur L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Metal truss
US 3541749 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1970 A. TROUTNER 3,541,749

METAL TRUSS Filed Sept. 20, 1968 ARTHUR TROUTNER INVENTOR.

' ATTY.

United States Patent Olfice 3,541,749 Patented Nov. 24, 1970 3,541,749 METAL TRUSS Arthur L. Troutner, Skyline Drive, Boise, Idaho 83702 Filed Sept. 20, 1968, Ser. No. 761,232 Int. Cl. E04c 3/04 U.S. Cl. 52-693 4 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A metal truss comprises upper and lower chords and a connecting zig-zag of web members. The chords comprise metal sheets formed rectangularly into outer, side, and inner chord segments. The inner segments have slots receiving the ends of the web members in overlapped relation. Pin means penetrate the chord side segments and the overlapped web member ends to interlock the elements of the truss assembly.

This invention relates to structural trusses. It pertains particularly to structural trusses of the class employed as joists for supporting floors, roofs, and other structural components.

Although metal trusses are well known, there is need for a metal truss which is light-weight, adapted to mass production, and useful particularly as a floor or ceiling joist.

It is the general object of the present invention to provide such a truss as well as one which has a high strength-weight ratio, which is of balanced construction, which functions efiiciently, which may be assembled rapidly and easily, which is fire proof, which is easily transported and erected, and which is relatively low in cost.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary view in side elevation of the metal truss of my invention;

'FIG. 2 is a fragmentary, transverse sectional view taken along line 2-2 of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view illustrating an alternate form of my truss.

In its broad concept, the metal truss of my invention includes upper and lower chords and a plurality of metal web members arranged zig-zag between the chords with their adjacent ends overlapped and having aligned openll'lgS.

Each chord comprises a fiat metal sheet formed into a central segment comprising the outer face of the chord, a pair of intermediate segments comprising the side faces of the chord, and a pair of inwardly directed terminal segments comprising the inner face of the chord.

The ends of the terminal segments are separated to form a slot which receives the overlapped ends of the web members. The intermediate segments have at spaced intervals along their length openings aligned with each other and with the openings through the overlapped ends of the web members. Pins penetrate all of the aligned openings, thereby interlocking the webs and chord in a strong, easily assembled structural truss.

As shown in FIG. 1, the metal truss of my invention comprises an upper chord 10, a lower chord 12 and a zigzag arrangement of interconnecting web members or links 14-.

Web members 14 may be formed of tubular steel and comprise body portions 16 and flattened end portions 18. The end portions have transverse openings 20 which align in the overlapped position of each pair of adjacent web members.

Except in some situations as to length, the upper and lower chords 10, 12 are substantially identical to each other.

Each chord is formed of a flat sheet of structural steel or other strong metal formed into segments which comprise the final truss.

Thus, as shown in FIG. 2, the chord in its final form comprises a central segment 22, a pair of intermediate segments 24, and a pair of terminal segments 26.

Central segment 22 forms the outer face of the chord; intermediate segments 24, the side faces, and terminal segments 26, the inner face of the chord.

Central segment 22 preferably is substantially flat.

Intermediate segments 24, however, are bent inwardly angularly to provide a fiat bearing section 24a and a pair of angularly extending connecting sections 24b. Central sections 24a are formed with transverse openings 28 which in the assembly of the truss align with openings 20 through the ends of the web members.

Terminal segments 26, which shape the inner face of the chord, preferably are formed with substantially flat horizontal sections 26a and with returned end sections 26b which substantially align with central sections 24a of chord side faces 24.

Together with central sections 24a, end sections 26b define a slot which receives the overlapped flattened ends 18 of web members 16. Also, sections 24a and 26b both provide bearing areas which bear against the ends of the web members.

The bearing effect of sections 24a, 2612 may be augmented by fabricating the chords from a sheet of metal which is resilient. The reverse bending of the sheet then provides spring action which tends to return bearing areas 24a, 26b toward a central location when they are displaced outwardly by wedging the web member ends between them.

The truss construction illustrated in FIG. 3 is similar to that illustrated in FIG. 2 except that the configuration of chord side segments 24 is different.

To provide increased contact of the chord side segments with pins 30, and thus augment frictional engagement between these two elements, the side segments 24 of the FIG. 3 embodiment are comprised of two angularly related sections 24c only. These sections are drilled in the manner indicated to provide pin openings 28 defined by a relatively large area of the chord side segments, thus insuring the desired high degree of frictional engagement with pins 30.

The metal truss of my invention is assembled easily.

'First upper and lower chords 10, 12 are placed in spaced relation with their respective slots facing each other. Next, web members 14 are arranged with the flat ends of adjacent ones overlapped. The overlapped ends of the web members are wedged into the slots of the chords. Thereupon the resiliency of the chords keeps the web members in place while the openings through their ends are aligned with the openings through the chord side segments and pins 30 are pressed into place.

The resulting truss has many desirable engineering features. It has a balanced section around the pins. Bearing areas of the chords engage the ends of the web members. Bending the side segments inwardly toward each other keeps the bending moment from the pins so that the pins transfer only shear. The flat upper surface 22 of upper chord 10 provides a surface for nailing plywood or lumber decking.

In addition, the truss is strong, easily assembled, adaptable to assembly in various configurations, easily constructed and fire proof.

I claim:

1. A metal truss comprising (a) upper and lower chords,

(b) a plurality of metal web members arranged zigzag between the chords with their adjacent ends overlapped,

(c) the overlapped ends of the web members having aligned openings therethrough,

((1) each chord comprising a flat metal sheet formed into a central segment comprising the outer face-of the chord, a pair of intermediate segments comprising the side faces of the chord, and a pair of inwardly directed terminal segments comprising the inner face of the chord,

(e) the ends of the terminal segments and the intermediate segments being separated to form a slot receiving the overlapped ends of the web members,

(f) the intermediate segments being bent inwardly to provide angular bearing areas engaging the side faces of the web member ends,

(g) the intermediate segments having at longitudinally spaced intervals openings aligned with each other and with the openings of the overlapped ends of the Web members, and

(h) pin means penetrating the aligned openings through the web members and chords for interlocking the same.

2. A metal truss comprising (a) upper and lower chords,

(b) a plurality of metal web members arranged zigzag between the chords with their adjacent ends over lapped,

(c) the overlapped ends of the web members having aligned openings therethrough,

(d) each chord comprising a fiat metal sheet formed into a central segment comprising the outer face of the chord, a pair of intermediate segments comprising the side faces of the chord, and a pair of inwardly directed terminal segments comprising the inner face of the chord,

(e) the ends of the terminal segments and the intermediate segments being separated to form a slot receiving the overlapped ends of the web members,

(f) the intermediate segments being bent inwardly to form fiat, central bearing areas engaging the web member ends,

(g) the intermediate segments having at longitudinally spaced intervals openings aligned with each other and with the openings of the overlapped ends of the web members, and

(h) pin means penetrating the aligned openings through the web members and chords for interlock-' ing the same.

3. A metal truss comprising (a) upper and lower chords,

(b) a plurality of metal web members arranged zigzag between the chords with their adjacent ends overlapped,

(c) the overlapped ends of the web members having aligned openings therethrough,

(d) each chord comprising a flat metal sheet formed into a central segment comprising the outer face of the chord, a pair of intermediate segments comprising the side faces of the chord, and a pair of inwardly directed terminal segments comprising the inner face of the chord,

(e) the ends of the terminal segments and the intermediate segments being separated to form a slot receiving the overlapped ends of the web members,

(f) the intermediate segments and terminal segments both being bent inwardly to provide bearing areas bearing against the web member ends,

(g) the intermediate segments having at longitudinally spaced intervals openings aligned with each other and with the openings of the overlapped ends of the web members, and

(h) pin means penetrating the aligned openings through the web members and chords for interlocking the same.

4. A metal truss comprising (a) upper and lower chords,

(b) a plurality of metal web members arranged zigzag between the chords with their adjacent ends overlapped,

(c) the overlapped ends of the web members having aligned openings therethrough,

((1) each chord comprising a fiat metal sheet formed into a central segment comprising the outer face of the chord, a pair of intermediate segments comprising the side faces of the chord, and a pair of inwardly directed terminal segments comprising the inner face of the chord,

(e) the ends of the terminal segments and the intermediate segments being separated to form a slot receiving the overlapped ends of the web members,

(f) the intermediate segments being bent angularly inwardly,

(g) the intermediate segments having at longitudinally spaced intervals openings aligned with each other and with the openings of the overlapped ends of the webmembers, and

(h) pin means penetrating the aligned openings through the web members and chords for interlocking the same.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,696,039 12/1928 Kane 52693 2,169,253 8/1939 Kotrbaty 52-693 X 3,129,493 4/1964 Grubb 52-694 X 3,221,467 12/1965 Henkels 52690 3,330,087 7/1967 Troutner 52-693 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,382,859 11/1964 France.

PRICE C. FAW, JR, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 52-732

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1696039 *Jun 29, 1925Dec 18, 1928Truscon Steel CoJoist
US2169253 *Oct 1, 1935Aug 15, 1939Ferrocon CorpBuilding structure and parts therefor
US3129493 *Jun 20, 1961Apr 21, 1964Charles Davis LtdMethods for the manufacture of lightweight structural members
US3221467 *Feb 1, 1963Dec 7, 1965American Metalcore Systems IncStructural member
US3330087 *Dec 31, 1963Jul 11, 1967Troutner Arthur LLong span, high load, composite truss joist
FR1382859A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4089148 *Nov 1, 1976May 16, 1978Oehmsen Plastic Greenhouse Mfg. Inc.Structural truss assembly
US4155150 *Jan 23, 1978May 22, 1979Oehmsen Plastic Greenhouse Mfg. Inc.Structural truss assembly and method
US4180003 *Nov 14, 1977Dec 25, 1979The Mead CorporationShelf support structure
US4986051 *Jun 14, 1988Jan 22, 1991Meyer Dolph ARoof truss and beam therefor
US5499480 *Feb 2, 1994Mar 19, 1996Bass; Kenneth R.Lightweight metal truss and frame system
US5544464 *Apr 5, 1994Aug 13, 1996Canam HambroComposite steel and concrete floor system
US5664388 *Nov 3, 1995Sep 9, 1997Donna BassStructural shear resisting member and method employed therein
US5692353 *Mar 30, 1995Dec 2, 1997Bass, Deceased; Kenneth R.Lumber-compatible lightweight metal construction system
US5771653 *Oct 11, 1996Jun 30, 1998Unimast IncorporatedChord for use as the upper and lower chords of a roof truss
US5842318 *Nov 19, 1997Dec 1, 1998Bass, Deceased; Kenneth R.Lumber-compatible lightweight metal construction system
US5904025 *Jul 18, 1997May 18, 1999Donna BassMethod for reinforcing a structural frame
US6170217Mar 31, 1999Jan 9, 2001Darrell G. MeyerBearing elements and methods relating to same
US7409804Dec 9, 2004Aug 12, 2008Nucon Steel CorporationRoof truss
US7513085Oct 24, 2003Apr 7, 2009Nucon Steel CorporationMetal truss
US7735294Aug 12, 2008Jun 15, 2010Nucon Steel CorporationRoof truss
US8006461Aug 12, 2008Aug 30, 2011Nucon Steel CorporationRoof truss
US20050086893 *Oct 24, 2003Apr 28, 2005Moody Donald R.Metal truss
US20060123733 *Dec 9, 2004Jun 15, 2006Moody Donald RRoof truss
US20080295442 *Aug 12, 2008Dec 4, 2008Nucon Steel CorporationRoof truss
US20080295448 *Aug 12, 2008Dec 4, 2008Nucon Steel CorporationRoof truss
WO1985002218A1 *Nov 7, 1984May 23, 1985Knud SkovA lattice truss
WO1994023149A1 *Mar 30, 1994Oct 13, 1994Bass, Donna, R.Lightweight metal truss and frame system
WO2000046459A1Feb 3, 2000Aug 10, 2000Darrell MeyerWeight bearing systems and methods relating to same
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/693
International ClassificationE04C3/04, E04C3/09
Cooperative ClassificationE04C2003/0491, E04C3/09
European ClassificationE04C3/09