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Publication numberUS3542435 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 24, 1970
Filing dateOct 27, 1967
Priority dateOct 27, 1967
Publication numberUS 3542435 A, US 3542435A, US-A-3542435, US3542435 A, US3542435A
InventorsHerrmann George E
Original AssigneeHerrmann George E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Curb and gutter section extractor
US 3542435 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor George E. Herrmann 1164 S. Lombard St., Oak Park, Illinois 60304 [21] Appl. No. 678,588 [22] Filed Oct. 27, 1967 [45] Patented Nov. 24, 1970 [54] CURB AND GUTTER SECTION EXTRACTOR 4 Claims, 8 Drawing Figs.

[52] U.S. CI 299/36, 214/145, 37/2 [51] Int. Cl E21c 47/00 [50] Field ofSearch ..37/117.5, 1, 2,C.l. Dig., 193; 299/36, 37, 1O, 18, 23, 64-66, 95; 61/63; 172/763, 698, 239, 247, 35; 94/lnq; 254/lnq; 294/1nq; 171/44, 46, 63, 103, 104; 214/3, 377,650--653,147-148,l38,131,145,132

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,388,461 11/1945 Baker 37/2 2,886,286 5/1959 Walls 37/2 2,322,115 6/1943 Cox et al 37/2 2,770,895 ll/l956 Rymkevitch 37/1175 2,878,002 3/1959 Haley 299/36 2,882,622 4/1959 Howard... 37/2 3,032,903 5/1962 Ede 299/36 3,207,232 9/1965 Bechman 37/2 Primary ExaminerRobert E. Pulfrey Assistant Examiner-Eugene H. Eickholt Attorney-Stone, Zummer & Livingstone Patented Nov. 24, 1970 Sheet eor efll/ew 39 16 W/i CURB AND GUTTER SECTION EXTRACTOR BACKGROIIND OF THE INVENTION For many years, streets in urban areas have been built with the outer edges of the street defined by a curb and gutter. Customarily, the curb and gutter is unitary poured concrete section having a foundation and a curb portion which extends upward a prescribed distance, depending upon the given construction, above the foundation, and the upper portion of the foundation defines a gutter portion. The curb and gutter is customarily poured separately from the pavement so that the curb and gutter, in many instances, acts as a retainer for the pavement. However, the curb portion of the curb and gutter section receives hard usage in that vehicles often strike the curb and portions of the curb often chip and break off. Furthermore, some of the older concretes disintegrate during the passage of time and exposure weather. In many urban areas, it is necessary to replace the curb and gutter sections or to remove the curb and gutter sections for the widening of a street.

The accepted method of removing a curb and gutter section is to break up the curb and gutter section with an air hammer, and then men, with picks, pull out pieces of broken concrete, and the fragmented curb and gutter sections are then scooped up with a loader and disposed of as may be appropriate. It should be noted that the height ofa curb and gutter section varies between 12 inches and 36 inches and in most cases the width of a curb and gutter section is approximately 1 foot, but this dimension also varies. This means that there is a considerable amount of concrete and the removal of the curb and gutter section requires approximately one man-hour for every 20 feet of curb and gutter section. It is thus apparent that the present-day method of removing curb and gutter sections is expensive. Although various pieces of equipment are available in the construction industry for performing various tasks, none is available to facilitate the removal curb and gutter sections.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The subject invention provides a curb and gutter section extractor which is adapted for mounting on a conventional piece of earth moving equipment customarily used in the field, such as a loader which has a bucket. The instant extractor is adapted for easy mounting on a bucket so that the device may be readily mounted or removed, as the particular situation may require. The instant extractor includes a boom which extends out beyond the bucket and has an adjustable column fixed to the boom with a wedge fixed to the column. The height of the column is selectively adjustable so that the device may be accommodated to any size curb and gutter sec tion. It is a principal object of the instant invention to provide a curb and gutter section extractor which may be mounted on a conventional piece of earth moving equipment, which extractor may be utilized to pull out curb and gutter sections having a length of 7 or 8 feet, thereby eliminating the necessity offragmenting the curb and gutter sections.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a curb and gutter section extractor which may be accommodated to a particular curb and gutter construction.

It is another present invention to provide a curb and gutter section extractor which may have its adjustment power operated.

It is a still further object of the herein-disclosed invention to provide a curb and gutter section extractor which is eeonomical to manufacture andeasy to handle.

Other objects and uses of this invention will become readily apparent to those skilled in the art upon a perusal of the following specification in light of the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. I is a perspective view showing a loader with a curb and gutter section extractor mounted thereon, which curb and gutter section extractor is an embodiment of the herein-disclosed invention;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view through a curb and gutter section showing a wedge of the curb and gutter section extras tor positioned below curb and gutter section in a position for raising the curb and gutter section;

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view of the curb and gutter section extractor shown with a curb and gutter section held between the wedge and boom of the extractor;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged cross-sectional view ofa portion of the extractor taken on line 4-4 of FIG. 1, showing the interior construction of the column of the extractor;

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view taken on line 5-5 of FIG. I;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged perspective view showing a mounting plate and fragmentaryportion ofthe boom ofthe extractor;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectional view taken on line 7-7 of FIG. 2; and

FIG. 8 is an enlarged cross-sectional view similar to FIG. 4 but showing a motor mounted in connection with a screw of the column.

DESCRIPTION OF THE. PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to the drawings. and especially to FIG. I. a curb and gutter section extractor, embodying the herein dis closed invention and generally indicated by numeral It), is shown mounted on a conventional loader I2, although it should be appreciated that the extractor It) may be mounted on any other conventional piece of power earth moving equip ment having a bucket.

The loader 12 is conventional in its construction in that is includes a bucket 14 mounted on a plurality of arms 16. The bucket 14 may be raised and lowered and tilted as desired, as is conventional in equipment of this general type. The bucket or scoop I4 is conventional in its construction in that it includes a base 18 havinga leading edge 20, and a pair of sides 22 and 24 are fixed to the base to form the sides ofthe bucket.

As may be seen in FIG. 1, the extractor generally includes a mounting plate 26 which provides a convenient fastening means to secure the extractor to side 24 of the bucket. A boom 28 is releasably secured to the mounting plate at one end and an adjustable column 30 is fixed to the other end of the boom perpendicular to the boom. An elongated wedge 32 is fixed to the lower portion of column 30 and extends toward the bucket substantially parallel to the boom.

The mounting plate 26, shown in FIG. 6, includes a bucket side plate 34 which generally conforms to the shape of the bucket side 24, as may be seen in FIG. I. The bucket side plate is a heavy steel plate which cooperates with the side 24 of the bucket to reinforce the bucket when a load is applied to the extractor. A pair of mounting studs 36 is welded onto the plate 34. The studs are positioned in a pair of apertures in the side 24 so that the studs extend through the side. Each of the studs has a threaded portion 38 adjacent to its free end.

The boom 28 includes. a rectangular heavy steel mounting tube 40, which mounting tube has a pair of mounting sleeves 42 fixed in the mounting tube and spaced. to receive the studs 36. A nut 43 is threadedly mounted on each of the studs with a washer 44 adjacent to the tube to hold the sleeves in position on the respective studs. The boom also includes an arm section 46 which is also made of rectangular heavy steel tubing and has a portion telescoping with the mounting tube and is welded to the mounting tube to fix the arm to the tube.

Looking now to FIG. 4, it may be seen that the column 30 includes a fixed stanchion 48, which is hollow heavy steel rectangular tube. The fixed stanchion is welded to the free end of arm 46 so that the stanchion 48 is perpendicular to the arm. A pari of steel brackets 50 is welded to the fixed stanchion and the arm to reinforce the fixed stanchion relative to the arm. Mounted on the upper end of stanchion 48 is a head 52.

The head 52 includes a head block 54 which is welded onto the upper portion of fixed stanchion 43. The head block includes an elongated aperture 56 with an enlarged recess 58 communicating with the aperture 56. A lock plate 60 having a stud aperture 62 is fixed to the head block by a plurality of conventional machine screws 64.

Rotatably mounted in the head 52 is an adjustment s:rew 66. The adjustment screw 66 includes an elongated threaded body 68 which has an enlarged lock collar 70 formed integral with one end, which lock collar is rotatably mounted in recess 53. An adjustment stud 72 having a square cross section is formed integral with the lock collar and is rotatably positioned in the stud aperture 62. The body of the adjustment screw is free to rotate in the elongated aperture 56.

The threaded body 63 threadedly engages an internally threaded mating block 74. A movable stanchion '76 which is made of a rectangular heavy steel tube has the block 74 positioned in the interior of stanchion 76 near the upper end thereof, and stanchion 76 is welded to the block. The movable stanchion istelescopically and slidably positioned within the fixed stanchion 48. g

The elongated wedge 32 is fixed to the bottom of the movable stanchion '76. The elongated wedge includes a steel l-beam body 78 which has one end tapered to a point 80, as may be seen in FIG. 4. A pair of steel side plates 82 is welded to the lbeam body and to the lower portion of the stanchion 76 to provide reinforcement for the junction between the movable stanchion and the l-beam body ofthe wedge.

In normal operation, the extractor is used by mounting the extractor on a bucket. The extractor is mounted by placing the bucket side plate 34 in the bucket so that the mounting studs 36 extend through a pair of apertures in'the side of the bucket. The mounting tube is then alined with the studs vo that the sleeves 42 will slip over the studs, so that the extractor assumes an attitude wherein the wedge is below the boom, and the wedge has its free end extending toward the bucket. The nuts 43 with washers 44 are then placed on their respective threaded portions 38 to lock the boom to the bucket.

It is important to note that in the normal operationofthe instant extractor, the space between the boom and the wedge should be slightly greater than the height of the curb and gutter section. Curb and gutter sections are normally 12 to 36 inches in height. For a particular curb and gutter section, the distance between the wedge and the boom is adjusted by turning adjustment screw 66. It may be appreciated that a wrench need only be placed on the adjustment stud 72, and the stud is turned in an appropriate direction to either raise or lower the wedge relative to the boom.

in order to extract a curb and gutter section, a 7 or 8 foot length of curb and gutter section is cracked; that is, a workman with an air hammer cracks the curb and gutter section so that there is a split in the entire curb and gutter section. Looking now to FIG. 2, a curb and gutter section generally indicated by numeral 84 is shown as it is in location; that is, with dirt on two sides and resting on dirt. The point 80 of wedge 32 is placed adjacent to the bottom of the curb and gutter section and the loader is moved backward so that the wedge slides under the curb and gutter section, compressing some of the dirt below the curb and breaking loose the gutter from the sidewalls of dirt slightly. Once the wedge is in position, the bucket 14 is raised, as may be done conventionally with a loader. This raising of the bucket breaks the curb and gutter section 84 away from the dirt to free the curb and gutter section. After the curb and gutter section is broken away from the dirt, the bucket is tilted so that the upper end of the curb and gutter section 84'engages the boom while the lower surface of the curb and gutter section engages the point 80 of the wedge; thereby, the weight of the curb and gutter section holds the curb and gutter section between the wedge and the boom. A safety chain 85, which has one end fixed to the boom, is then wrapped around the curb and gutter section and secured to itself to prevent accidental slippage of the curb and gutter section. out from engagement with the boom and the wedge. The curb and gutter section is then carried away, so that it may be loaded. lt is readily apparent that the instant device allows large sections of curb and gutter to be lifted out of location and removed without the necessity of fragmenting the section for removal so that there is a considerable savings in time and effort.

Looking now to FIG. 8, a modified form of the instant extractor is shown therein. All of the parts of FIG. 8 are identical to the parts described above, withthe addition of a fluid operat :d motor 86, which is mounted in driving connection with tl e stud 72. The fluid operated-motor is controlled by the operat )r of the loader to provide a convenient means for raising and lowering the wedge relative to the boom. Although a fluid operated motor is shown herein, it is readily apparent that a suitable electric motor could be used in its stead. However, the remainder of the operation of the device is identical to that which has been shown and described above.

Although a specific embodiment has been shown and described in detail above, it is readily apparent that those skilled in the art may make various modifications and changes in the deviceand in the specific materials and application of the device without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention. it is to be expressly understood that the subject invention is limited only by the appended claims.

lclaim:

l. A curb and gutter section extractor for use with power earth moving equipment comprising, a boom having one end adapted for attachment to the power earth moving equipment. a column attached to the other end of the boom, and an elongated wedge connected to the column, said wedge having a free end extending toward the power earth moving equipment, said wedge being spaced from the boom a distance slightly greater than the height of a curb and gutter section to be removed, whereby the curb and gutter section is positioned between the wedge and the boom and is held therebetween during lifting of the curb and gutter section by the power earth moving equipment, said column including a fixed hollow stanchion having a rectangular cross section fixed to the other end of the boom, a hollow movable stanchion having a rectangular cross section slidably mounted in the fixed hollow stanchion, a head fixed to the fixed hollow stanchion, a screw having one end rotatably mounted in the head, and an internally threaded block fixed to the movable hollow stanchion in threaded engagement with the screw, whereby rotation of the screw moves the movable hollow stanchion relative to the fixed hollow stanchion.

Z. A curb and gutter section extractor as defined in claim 1. including a motor connected to the screw to provide a power source to rotate the screw.

3. A curb and gutter section extractor for use with power earth moving equipment having a bucket, comprising, a mounting plate having a pair of mounting studs fixed therein positioned in the bucket and having the studs extending through a side of the bucket, a boom having one end fixed to the mounting studs, a fixed hollow stanchion having a rectangular cross section fixed to the other end of the boom and being substantially perpendicular to said boom, a head fixed to the fixed hollow stanchion, an adjustment screw having a threaded body and a lock collar rotatably mounted in the head, said adjustment screw havingan adjustment stud and extending upwardly from said head, a block threadedly engaging the threaded body of the adjustment screw, a movable hoilow stanchion having a rectangular cross section slidably mounted in the fixed hollow stanchion and being fixed to the block, and an elongated wedge fixed to the lower portion of the movable hollow stanchion and extending toward the bucket substantially parallel'to the boom, said wedge having its free end tapered, whereby a curb and gutter section positioned between the wed re and the boom is held therebetween during lifting of the cu.b.and gutter section by the earth moving equipment.

4. A curb and gutter section extractor as defined in claim 3. including a motor mounted in engagement with the adjustment stud for selectively turning the screw to position the stanchions relative to each other.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Pa 3,542 ,4 3s Dated November 24 1970 George E. Herrmann It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 1, line 6, after "is" insert a line 17, after "exposure" insert to line 37, after "removal" insert of line 60, after "another" insert object of the Column 2, line 29, "is", second occurrence, should read it line 64, after "is" insert a line 67, "pari" should read pair Column 3, line 27, "alined" should read aligned line 54, "sidewalls" should read side walls Signed and sealed this 2nd day of February 1971 (SEAL) Attes t:

EDWARD M.FLETCHER,JR. WILLIAM E. SCHUYLER, JR. Attes ting Officer Commissioner of Patents FORM PO-IOSO (10-69)

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4480942 *Aug 25, 1982Nov 6, 1984Farrow Charles TApparatus and method for laying pipe
US4657307 *Dec 16, 1985Apr 14, 1987J. I. Case CompanyConcrete pavement breaker
US5315772 *Dec 16, 1992May 31, 1994Nelson LalondeFarm tractor with backhoe bucket
US7695214 *May 7, 2007Apr 13, 2010Robert MailandAsphalt pavement remover
US20090297268 *Mar 28, 2007Dec 3, 2009Green Arm Co., Ltd.Method for Removing Asphalt Pavement, System for Removing Asphalt Pavement, Electromagnetic Induction Coil Unit, Apparatus for Removing Asphalt Pavement, and Method for Peeling off Asphalt Pavement
Classifications
U.S. Classification299/36.1, 414/724
International ClassificationE02F3/96, E01C23/12, E01C23/00, E02F3/40, E02F3/04
Cooperative ClassificationE02F3/962, E02F3/401, E01C23/121
European ClassificationE01C23/12B, E02F3/96C, E02F3/40A