Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3543268 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 24, 1970
Filing dateMay 27, 1969
Priority dateMay 27, 1969
Publication numberUS 3543268 A, US 3543268A, US-A-3543268, US3543268 A, US3543268A
InventorsJamison Fred W
Original AssigneeJamison Fred W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrical alarm system
US 3543268 A
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 24, 1970 Flw. JAMISON ELECTRICAL ALARM SYSTEM Filed May 27, 1969 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. FRED W JAM/SON.

Nov. 24, 1970 F. w. JAMISON ELECTRICAL ALARM SYSTEM 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 2'7, 1969 INVENTOF FRED W JAMISON.

United States Patent O 3,543,268 ELECTRICAL ALARM SYSTEM Fred W. Jamison, 3944B Monroeville Blvd., Apt. 2, Monroeville, Pa. 15146 Continuation-impart of application Ser. No. 551,331,

May 19, 1966. This application May 27, 1969, Ser.

Int. Cl. G081) 1/08; H02j 3/ H02p 1/04 U.S. Cl. 340-416 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE An electrical wiring system and receptacle in which the receptacle includes three terminals, one serving as a common terminal and the other two serving as separate supply terminals, and the wiring is designed to provide an alarm function. A first line conductor connected to one side of a current supply is connected to a first one of the separate supply terminals. A normally open switch is connected in a current flow path between the two separate supply terminals. A second line conductor is connected to the other side of the current supply and to the common supply terminal. With this system, a plug of an appliance may be plugged into the common and first terminals of the receptacle for normal operation, and a normally closed alarm may be plugged into or connected between the common and second terminals of the receptacle. The normally open switch therefore controls the energization of the alarm, and the switch may be operated by a window, door or the like so that the switch closes when the window or door is opened to energize and sound the alarm. Plural switches may be wired in parallel.

RELATED APPLICATION This application is a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 551,331 filed on May 19, 1966 by the present inventor and now Pat. No. 3,466,454.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION It is an object of the present invention to provide a wiring system and receptacle for allowing an appliance and an alarm to be plugged into or connected to the same receptacle, the appliance being operated in the normal manner and the alarm being sounded in response to closing of a switch operated by a window, door or the like.

Another object of the invention is to provide a wiring system and receptacle with an alarm controlling feature which permits a single alarm to be sounded when any of several windows is opened.

A further object of the invention is to 'permit the alarm to be unplugged or disconnected from the receptacle and another appliance replace the alarm.

Still another object is to provide a control feature for the alarm which keeps the alarm on for a predetermined time after a door, for example, has been opened and closed.

Other objects of this invention will appear in the following description and appended claims, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part of this specification wherein like reference characters designate corresponding parts in the several views.

On the drawings FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic wiring diagram showing a wiring system and receptacle;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the receptacle;

FIG. 3 is a diagrammatic wiring diagram of an equivalent circuit;

FIG. 4 is a schematic diagram of a wiring system and a plurality of receptacles with window and door operated switches for controlling an alarm;

FIG. 5 is a view of a wiring connection for the receptacle; and

FIG. 6 is a schematic diagram of a motorized control for the alarm.

Before explaining the present invention in detail, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and arrangement of parts illustrated in the accompanying drawings, since the invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced or carried out in various Ways. Also, it is to be understood that the phraseology or terminology employed herein is for the purpose of description and not of limitation.

Referring specifically to the drawings and particularly FIG. 2, the numeral 5 designates a conventional molded Bakelite body being formed hollow and divided longitudinally by a partition 6 and with the parts intermediate its length carrying a vertical partition 7 that extends upwardly to be flush with the inner ends 8 and 8' of the body 5. Fixed within the hollow of the body and below the partition 6 is a flat metallic conductor 9 that carries the spring contacts 10 and 10 with the conductor 9 having a set screw 11 whereby to connect a conductor for the negative side of the source of energy. In the hollow above the partition 6 and at each side of the partition 7, there is positioned a flat conductor plate 12 and 12', having terminal screws 13 and 13' whereby to connect a positive conductor of the circuitry, illustrated particularly in FIG. 1. The conductors 12 and 12' are separated by the partitions 7 and form with the conductor 9 two separate circuits. The body 5 carries the usual front integral plates 14 that are slotted to expose the spring contacts 10, 10', 10 and 10" for the conductors 9 and 12 and 12'.

Referring now to FIG. 1, a source of electrical energy having a positive conductor 15 and a negative conductor 16, the positive conductor 15 is connected to a switch device 4, which may be a conventional wall switch and, when the switch 4 is closed, functions to form positive conductors 17 and 18 and the negative conductor 16 forms a negative conductor 19. The positive conductor 17 is connected to the spring contacts 10" through a conductor 20 and a corresponding spring contact 10" is connected to the conductor 18 by a conductor 21. Contacts 10 and 10 of the opposite side of the plug device 5 are connected to the negative conductor 19 by a conductor 22. Conventional prongs 23 and 23 enter between the contacts 10 and 10" and establish a flow of current to either an appliance 24, which may be any well known device and the appliance 24 is connected into the circuit by a switch 25 or, the lower pair of prongs 23 and 23' may energize a lamp or other device, shown at 26. An accessory, similar to the appliance 24 may also be energized and individually controlled by a switch 27.

It will thus be apparent, that with the improved plug of this invention, plug devices having terminals may be inserted and thereby establish two individual circuits or a series of plugs may be disposed in a convenient location and connected to the conductors 9, 12 and 12 by suitable wire conductors and also the several circuits may be controlled by the switch 4. As will be apparent, the plug of this device controls two circuits, one open and one closed. This will be done by using two positive and one negative terminals. The upper circuit would be closed, and would be used for television sets, for instance or any appliance having its own switch. Lights or other apparatus used would be plugged into the lower circuit and turned oft and on by the Wall switch 4.

Referring now to FIG. 3, there has been provided a housing 28 in which is fitted and clamped a plurality of elongated metallic terminal strips 29, 29 and 29". The uppermost strip 29 is connected to the source of energy 15 and the conductor 15' is connected to the lowermost strip 29 by a conductor 30 being energized with respect to the conductor 15' by a wall switch 31. The intermediate strip 29" is connected to a negative conductor 32 and as shown, plugs having prongs 33 and 33' establish a flow of current to a lamp or other device 34 or to an appliance 35, that carries its own switch 36.

In the use of the invention, the Plug is connected to the negative and positive conductors, through the medium of the screws 13 and 13' or the screw 11, providing a pair of separated circuits through the conductors 12 and 9 upon one end of the plug and 12 and 9 upon the opposite end of the plug. The circuitry thus facilitates the energization of lamps or appliances and is a distinct improvement over the plugs in conventional use. The construction of the plug 5 by separating the upper conductor plates 12 and 12' insulating the plates 12 and 12' from each other, makes it possible to install wiring in a building or the like in a simple manner. The spring contacts and 10, carried by the conductor 9 are common ground connections and with the conductors 12 and 12', constituting a complete circuit to the apparatus to be energized.

FIG. 4 is a schematic diagram of a wiring system and receptacle arrangement provided with window and door operated switches for controlling an alarm. In FIG. 4, the receptacles 100, 102, 104 and 106 are each of the same construction as has been described and claimed in connection with FIG. 2.

Each of these receptacles has a common terminal 108 and all of these common terminals are connected by lines 110 to a line conductor 112 which in turn is connected to one side of a current supply source which may be an ordinary home AC current Supply. Each of the receptacles also has a first supply terminal 114 and a second separate supply terminal 116 in accordance with the previous description. Prongs are provided for each of the terminals 108, 114 and 116 so that one plug may be connected to or plugged into the prongs of terminals 108 and 114 and another plug may be plugged into or connected to the prongs for terminals 108 and 116.

The wiring of receptacles 100, 102 and 104 will be described with reference to FIG. 4, and the wiring of receptacle 106 will be described later with reference to FIG. 6. A line conductor 118 is connected to one side of the current source and is also connected by each of the lines 120 to the terminals 114. The line conductor 118 may be divided to provide two branch lines 122 and 124 with a switch 126 being connected in series in only line 124 as shown. Branch line 122 is the branch which is connected to terminals 114. The other branch line 124 is connected by lines 128 to the other supply terminals 116 of the receptacles 100, 102 and 104.

It may be seen from the description thus far that switch 126 must be closed in order to energize terminals 116, so switch 126 controls current flow through branch line 124 and any appliance which may be plugged into terminals 108 and 116. Terminals 114 receive current from branch line 122, and since there is no control switch in this line, the current flow in any appliance plugged into terminals 108 and 114 is not affected by the switch 126.

Switches 130, 132 and 134 are connected across lines 122 and 124, the connections in FIG. 4 being made at terminals 114 and 116.

For purposes of describing the alarm function of the wiring system, it will be assumed that a normally closed alarm device is plugged into terminals 108 and 116 of receptacle 100, although it should be understood that the alarm device could be plugged into the corresponding terminals of any of the receptacles shown in FIG. 4. It will also be assumed that switch 126 is open as shown, and that switches 130, 132, 134 and 136 are also open.

The latter switches are adapted to be operated to a closed position in response to opening of a window, door or the like. Thus, it will be assumed that switches '130, 132 and 134 are operated by windows 138, 140 and 142, and that switch 136 is operated-by a door 144. These switches are open when the window or door is closed, and any one of these switches will close when the corresponding window or door is opened.

It switch 130 is closed in response to opening of window 138, a current flow path is completed from line 122 through switch 130 to terminal 116. If a normally closed alarm device A is plugged into terminals 108 and 116, the alarm will be energized and will sound when switch 130 closes. The alarm will remain on until switch 130 is opened in response to closing of window 138.

Suppose that switch 132 is closed rather than switch 130. A circuit is then completed from line 122 through a line 120, switch 132, terminal 116, a line 128, line 124, another line 128 to terminal 116 of receptacle 100. Thus the alarm A which is plugged into terminals 108 and 116 of receptacle is sounded when switch 132 closes and will remain on until switch 132 is opened.

Suppose that switch 134 is closed by opening of window 142. A current flow path is completed from line 122 through a line 120, terminal 114 of the receptacle 104, switch 134, terminal 116 of receptacle 104, line 128, line 128 connected to receptacle 100, terminal 116 of receptacle 100, and the alarm device plugged into terminals 108 and-116 of receptacle 100. Again, the'alarm sounds until switch 134 is opened.

Thus, it may be seen that the switches 130, 132 and 134 are in parallel with each other across lines 122 and 124, and that closing of any of these switches 130, 132 and 134 will energize the alarm A. The same result will occur if the alarm A is plugged into terminals 108 and 116 of the receptacle 102 or receptacle 104. It should be understood, however, that a single switch, such as switch 130, may be used with a single receptacle, such as receptacle 100, if desired. In this case, the branch line 124 could be omitted if desired, since switch is connected across terminals 114 and 116 of receptacle 100.

FIG. 5 shows a simple way of connecting line 112 to the terminals 108. In FIG. 5, line 112 has been cut and the conductor wire has been exposed to provide two wire ends 112a and 11211. An insulating holder 146 having apertures or slots therein has been clipped over wire ends 112a and 112b to retain them in spaced relation. Wire ends 112a and 112!) may then be bent as shown by the dashed lines in FIG. 5 to engage a terminal 108 of one of the receptacles, or a binding post for that terminal, in order to connect line 112 to the common terminal 108 of the receptacle.

FIG. 6 illustrates the wiring of receptacle 106 to which the door-operated switch 136 is connected. It may be seen that branch line 122 is connected to terminal 114, and branch line 124 is connected to terminal 116 in accordance with the previous description. Terminal 108 is connected by a line 110 to the common line 112. Line 112 is also connected to a motor 150, and line 124 is connected through terminal 116 and a line 154 to the motor, it being assumed that line 124 is normally open since switch 126 is open. Line 122 is connected through terminal 114 and line 152 to a cam operated switch 156. The contacts 158 of this switch are opened and closed by means of a cam 160 which is driven by the motor 150. One side of the switch 136 is connected to terminal 114, and the other side of switch 136 is connected to terminal 116, so the switch 136 is connected across lines 122 and 124 just as switches 130, 132 and 134 are.

It is assumed that switch 136 is operated by a door, and that switch 136 will close only if the door is opened. It will also be assumed that an alarm device is plugged into terminals 108 and 116 of receptacle 106, rather than being plugged into the corresponding terminals of receptacle 100 as shown in FIG. 4. If the door is opened, switch 136 closes. A current flow path is then completed from line 122, through terminal 114, switch 136, and terminal 116 to the alarm device A which is then energized. Some of the current from line 122 also flows through line 154 and the motor 150 to line 112. The motor then starts to run, and the cam 160 closes contacts 158 which are normally open. Current can then flow from line 122 through line 152, switch 156 and motor 150 to line 112 to keep the motor energized if the door should be closed to reopen contacts 136. Some of this current flows from the motor through line 154 to terminal 116 to keep the alarm A energized when switch 136 opens.

The motor makes one complete revolution keeping contacts 158 closed and continuing to sound the alarm. After this revolution is completed, contacts 158 open so line 122 is thereby disconnected from the motor 150 and also terminal 116. The motor stops and the alarm A is turned ofi.

The switch 136 could be controlled by a window rather than a door if desired. Similarly, it should be understood that switch 136 may be operated by a door without the motorized control feature if desired.

It will be apparent from the foregoing description that the invention provides a wiring system and receptacle with alarm controlling functions which are relatively simple and flexible. An alarm may be controlled by a single switch or a plurality of switches, and one or more receptacles may be used. A wall switch is optional where the alarm control feature is used. A motorized alarm controlling function may also be provided, if desired.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. An electrical wiring system with integrated alarm including in combination,

(a) a receptacle having a common terminal and first and second separate supply terminals arranged so that one plug can be plugged into said first and common terminals and another plug can be concurrently plugged into said second and common terminals, said terminals being insulated from each other by an insulating body of said receptacle,

(b) a first line conductor connected to said first supply terminal and connected to one side of a current pp y,

(c) a second line conductor connected to said common supply terminal and connected to the other side of said current supply,

(d) an alarm device connected between said second terminal and said common terminal,

(e) normally open first switch means closed by opening of a closure of a building and connected to provide at least one current flow path between said first line conductor and said alarm device for energizing said alarm device in response to closing of said first switch means,

(f) a third line conductor connected to said second terminal,

(.3) second normally open switch means connected between said first and third line conductors, said first switch means eflFectively connected across said first and third line conductors, and

(h) at least one additional receptacle having the same construction as said first named receptacle including a first supply terminal to which said first line conductor is connected, a second supply terminal to which said third line conductor is connected, and a common terminal to which said second line conductor is connected.

2. The alarm system as claimed in claim 1 in which said first switch means includes a plurality of normally open switches connected in parallel between said first and third conductors to form a plurality of current flow paths between said first line conductor and said alarm device.

3. The alarm system as claimed in claim 2 in which each of said switches is operable in response to opening and closing of a respective window, door, or the like, of a building.

4. The alarm system as claimed in claim 2 in which said switches are each effectively connected between said first and third line conductors.

5. The alarm system as claimed in claim 1 including a motor connected to said second terminal and to said second line conductor, a cam driven by said motor, an additional switch operated by said cam, and means connecting said additional switch to said motor and to said first line conductor, said first switch means being adapted to supply energizing current to said motor upon closing thereof in order to operate said cam to in turn close said additional switch which then keeps said alarm and said motor energized for a predetermined time until said cam opens said additional switch.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,312,580 3/1943 OBrien 307l2 X 2,447,625 8/1948 Astin 340-416 X 2,474,843 7/ 1949 Helsing 318-466 3,054,994 9/1962 Haram. 3,349,363 10/1967 Goodman.

ALVIN H. WAR ING, Primary Examiner.

P. PALAN, Assistant Examiner.

U.S. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2312580 *Jul 27, 1940Mar 2, 1943Pierce John B FoundationElectrical wiring system
US2447625 *Dec 29, 1945Aug 24, 1948Westinghouse Electric CorpLine fault indicating system
US2474843 *Sep 21, 1946Jul 5, 1949Westinghouse Electric CorpControl mechanism
US3054994 *Jul 30, 1958Sep 18, 1962Carsten Haram ArthurVisual signal generation and electrical outlet control means therefor
US3349363 *Dec 10, 1965Oct 24, 1967Goodman Ronald DElectrical plug unit embodying duplex outlets
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3938121 *Aug 7, 1974Feb 10, 1976Jamison Fred WElectrical wiring and alarm system
Classifications
U.S. Classification340/527, 340/538, 307/12, 307/112, 340/545.1, 318/466
International ClassificationG08B13/02, G08B13/08, H01R25/14, H01R25/00
Cooperative ClassificationG08B13/08, H01R25/14
European ClassificationG08B13/08, H01R25/14