Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3543416 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 1, 1970
Filing dateJul 10, 1967
Priority dateJul 10, 1967
Publication numberUS 3543416 A, US 3543416A, US-A-3543416, US3543416 A, US3543416A
InventorsPannier Ralph A
Original AssigneePannier Corp The
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Identifying code and method of producing the same and a deciphering chart therefor
US 3543416 A
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1970 R. A. PANNIER 3,543,416

IDENTIFYING CODE AND METHOD OF PRODUCING THE SAME AND A DECIEHERING CHART THEREFOR Original Filed July 20, 1965 .5 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. MIL PM A. Pam/Wm JLIIIIF H 1970 R. A. PANNIER 3,543AM IDENTIFYING CODE AND METHOD OF PRODUCING THE SAME AND A DEGIPHERING CHART THEREFOR rigmal Filed July 20, 1965 5 Sheets-Sheet P,

R. A. mmmm @M-MM E SAME AND A IDENTIFYING CODE AND METHOD OF PRODUCING TH DECIPHERING CHART THEREFOR 1965 I5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Original Filed July 20,

N. HIM/WV INVENTOR. fim PM A! Han/MEI? 6 LAWW IDENTIFYING CODE AND METHOD OF PRODUC- ING THE SAME AND A DECIPHERING CHART THEREFOR Ralph A. Pannier, McCandless Township, Allegheny County, Pa, assignor to The Pannier Corporation, Pittsburgh, Pa, a corporation of Pennsylvania Original application July 20, 1965, Ser. No. 473,286.

Divided and this application July 10, 1967, Ser.

Int. Cl. G09c 3/08 U.S. Cl. 354 8 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A simplified identifying code for printing on fast moving material and a deciphering chart for reading the code on the printer as well as the rinted code of identification. The identifying code consists of a series of uniformly spaced vertical parallel reference lines each having uniformly vertically spaced reference dots thereon, and each code character is represented by vertical lines of different lengths and parallel to and positioned bet-ween adjacent of the parallel reference lines, each of which has a character starting reference dot, the length and position of each character line relative to its starting reference dot on an adjoining reference line determining the code.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION U.S. Pat. 990,248 discloses a technique of providing the cutting die or templets for boot and shoe blanks with edge notches to identify through memory the length and width sizes of the corresponding blanks permitting the workmen to properly assemble matched sets of upper blanks. The notched edges are concealed in the finished shoe.

U.S. Pat. Re. 25,681 discloses the art of printing in code the complete history of the plate through the use of a series of bands on a printing roll extending the width of the tinplate wherein the code was limited to cooperating connecting designs or mere preselected spacing between annular rings.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF INVENTION The code comprising this invention comprises at least one reference line for each character having uniformly spaced dots forming reference marks and one or more code mark lines or characters between adjacent reference lines associated with selected of their respective reference marks in a multiple of combinations to provide a plurality of character units. The selection of a combination of such character units provides number and letter combinations which permits unlimited designations. For tinplate, which is printed or etched in the steel plate before the application of the tin coating, the parallel lines with and without the reference marks could spell out each individual company, the plant, the mill, the heat and the date. Thus the identity of the product after use could always be determined by washing or dissolving off the tin and reading the code. This code mark is not visible under the tin and cannot be objectionable.

By placing the reference marks in alignment laterally and using different code mark straight parallel lines or characters, charts are readily used on transparent sheets to read the printed code on the continuous sheet or on the printing dies themselves by looking through the chart in State Patent the reverse direction. It is important to be enabled to read the code on the dies of the printing roll as well as from the printed article for the same chart.

The principal object of this invention is the provision of method and apparatus for marking a traveling strip such as a strip tinplate base material with a code that determines the manufacture of the strip, the line, and the date, which marking is thin and not visible through the tinplate which when removed is readable through a chart.

Another object is the provision of a printing code including a plurality of printing code lines one including a reference line. This object has many advantages since the reference line and one code line provide one selection of characters or digits and a third code line multiplies the code combinations. The reference line with reference marks is a guide for the initial point and direction from which the code is read through the aid of a chart.

The printing roll is rotatably supported to operate with the elastomer printing bands in surface contact with the fast running strip to be tinplated. The roll is longer than the tinplate strip is wide and has seated on its surface many independent elastomer printing bands locked against movement on the roll and each with an indicia all lying in a common cylindrical printing surface for the length of the roll. These printing bands are stretched to be inserted on the printing roll. The width of each band is but a very small fraction of the length of the roll so that the code may be repeated many times along the length of the roll. It is preferable that the elastomer have electrical properties, at least its area if not the whole band, to electrically apply the printing to the tinplate strip to lightly etch the same. This character of printing may be readily covered by the tinplate coating without showing through.

Another object is the provision of a chart, preferably transparent and materially shorter in length than the strip is wide. This chart is provided with all the indicia needed to read the information printed by placing the same over the printed area. The code can be deciphered at a glance as it is preferably the same size as the printed code and is compared by matching the indicia. By reversing or turning the chart over, the code on the elastomer printing bands mounted on the printing roll may be readily deciphered.

Although the present invention is primarily discussed in relation to the marking of tinplate, it must be realized that it is equally applicable to the marking of most any material whether it be conductive or nonconductive. For example, the identifying code of the present invention may be applied to the reverse side of wallpaper or similar goods to identify the company, the plant, the mill, the style, the date, etc.

Other objects and advantages appear hereinafter in the following description and claims.

The accompanying drawings show for the purpose of exemplification without limiting this invention or the claims thereto certain practical embodiments illustrating the principles of this invention wherein:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a printing roll having a series of printing bands mounted thereon.

FIG. 2 is a diagrammatic view illustrating the arrangement of the roll of FIG. 1 mounted to etch an upwardly moving strip with parts of the printing roll being in section.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged cross section of an elastomer printing band mounted on an electroconductive roll and which is itself made of electroconducti've material.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged sectional view of two elastomer printing bands having a base section of insulating material capped with a printing section of electroconductive elastomer vulcanized thereon.

FIG. 5 is a plan view of the traveling strip backed up with an electroconductive roll with its other side being printed by an electroconductive elastomer printing band each one of which is independently controlled through their engagement with an independent elastomer conducting roll which is energized from a brush for independentl y controlling each band in its application of etching the strip.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged view depicting the annular printing band with its reference line and reference dots or marks together with the several code markings which with the reference line are made integral of electroconductive elastomer material.

FIG. 7 is an enlarged view of a printing band having two reference lines and different character printing codes thereon.

FIG. 8 is a comparator chart containing the code in forms of the reference lines and marked with the adjacent code lines.

Referring to FIG. 1 of the drawings 10 indicates the printing drum which is provided with a series of annular projecting flanges 11 interrupted by a plurality of transverse locking slots 12. The ends of the drum are provided with the shaft section 13 and 14 one of which is mounted in a bearing 15, the other end being open for the mounting of additional bands. The whole of the surface of this member is preferably coated with an elastomer 1-6 that is sufficiently strong to support and permit frequent changes of the printing bands 17 each one of which is provided with a separate code as noted herein and is selected as being marked numerically from one through nine and zero. These printing bands 17 as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 are similar to that shown in FIG. 4 in that they are provided with a base or body section 18 the bore of which is provided with a transverse locking lug 20. Each side of the elastomer printing ring 17 is cut away at 21 for receiving the annular flanges 11. The locking slots 12 and the locking lugs are not necessary for printing although preferable in some instances.

The outer surface of the bodies 18 are provided with a full cylindrical surface 22 of elastomer material having electrical conducting properties and on which the outwardly extending sections 23 are formed integral with the cylindrical surface 22 of the band 17 and is also formed integral with the body section 18. The printing surface 24 is provided on the outer end of each of the outwardly extending section 23 nad all of which lie in a common cylindrical surface 25 indicated by dotted lines. Each of the outwardly extending sections 23 provide different portions for producing different printing indicia. The printing surface indicated at 26 is the reference line and generally extends the full circumference of the printing band 17. The dots or reference points 27 are indicated at spaced positions along the printing line 26 and the different code printing surfaces are indicated by the other outwardly projecting surfaces 23 and are indicated by the indicia or reference numeral 28. These codes will be discussed later in detail.

These printing bands 17 as shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 4 engage the moving untinned metal strip 30 which may pass in any direction across the face of the printer rolls and in FIG. 2 is moving upwardly and one side of which is supported by the backup roll 31 the outer surface of which is preferably coated with an elastomer having current carrying characteristics making it an electrode means which engages the opposite side of the travelling untinned metal strip 30 that is not being printed on or etched at this time. The axis of the backup roll 31 is oifset from the axis of the printing roll 10 so the latter will not engage the former if the strip rides to one side. This roll 31 is shown to be connected by the line L2 representing one 'side of the circuit through the untinned metal strip 30.

The roll 10 with the series of properly selected printiIlg nds 17 engages the one si e of he untinned strip 30 and is rotatably supported and preferably driven "to be in synchronism with the surface speed of the upwardly moving strip 30. The printing surface 24 of each of the printing bands on the roll 10 are shown to be supplied with an inker indicated at 32 having an inker supply roll 33 engaging a transfer roll 34 which in turn extends across the entire face of the roll 10 to supply an ink or electrolytic marking liquid which in this case would be a base, neutral solution, or an acid carried on the printing surfaces 24 rotating in the direction of the arrow to print on the surface of the moving strip as it travels upwardly as indicated by the vertical arrow. The inker 32 may be replaced by a foam rubber inker that merely engages the surface of the code printing lines '26 and 28.

After the printing surfaces 24 have engaged the strip they travel around and come in contact with an electrode means such as the electrode roll 35 which in turn is connected to the line L1 to complete the electrical circuit. Current passes from the line L1 which may be considered negative potential, through the body, the cylindrical surface 22 or along the printing surface 24 t0 the arcuate printing positions of the same where they engage the traveling strip 30 and thence travel to the strip 30 to electroplate this surface, and through the same to the electrode roll 31 and the line L2. Thus the current passing to and through the traveling strip is simultaneous with the deposit of a base, or neutral or acid to the strip and thus electroplates or etches the same in the surface of the strip as it travels at a high and fast rate and with and without harm to the surface of the strip. If the strip is previously wetted with an etching liquid as it passes the printing roll only the electrode roll 35 and the backup roll 31 are necessary and the inker 32 is dispensed with.

This electroplating or etching, of course, will be in accordance with the code on the printing bands 17 mounted on the printing roller 10.

As shown in FIG. 3 the printing band 37 is made of elastomer material that is electroconductive and is mounted on an electroconductive roll 36 which is also supplied with the annular radial flanges 11 together with the slot 12. Here the electric current would be allowed to pass through the roll 36 and the whole of the printing band 37 which is of electroconductive material from whence the current passes directly to the printing surfaces 24 for the purpose of etching the code on the surface of the traveling strip 30 which is tangent to the printing surfaces 24 at the printing cylindrical surface 25.

As shown in FIG. 5 the backup roll 31 has the line L2 connected thereto and the traveling strip 30 is engaged between this backup roll 31 and the tangentially offset printing surfaces 24 of the several elastomer dies 17 on the roll 10. The backup roll 31 in this instance is an electrode roll being covered with an elastomer that has current carrying capacity. The second electrode roll 35 as shown in FIG. 5 is made up of a series of sections 38, 39, 40, 41 and 42 which are independent and insulated from each other, there being an insulator 43 therebetween. These elastomer sections 39 to 42 inclusive are electroconductive so that they will conduct current to each one or a selected number of the independent printing bands 17 and these sections in turn are connected by the brush means 44, 45, 46, 47 and 48. Each of these brushes are connected by wires to a corresponding switch S1, S2, S3, S4 and S5 as shown which in turn are connected to the bus line 50, and the DC supply source 51, and the line 52 to L2. Thus the line L1 of FIG. 2 has been replaced by an independent series of switch means to the common line 50 as shown in FIG. 5. In this way one may selectively control the printing of each band or group of bands as the case may be and thereby determine the code to be printed by merely energizing the selected section.

As shown in FIG. 6 the enlarged view of the single band such as illustrated at 17 shows the printing face with the circular or continuous perimeter that is preferably initially formed in a closed loop but may be made in a continuous strip and when pulled around the drum with its opposite ends supplied with a cement may be cemented together for the purpose of completing the band and also for mechanically and electrically connecting the adjacent parts of the body 18 and the upper portion 22 which are respectively of insulating and electroconductive materials. As soon as the ends are brought together in accurate alignment and held for a very few minutes the cement takes hold and permits the band to be released and said band will snap in place on the drum. If necessary, the connected ends may be joined by a conductor.

The printing surface on this band provides a continuous annular line 26 which has, at uniformly spaced positions, the dots 27. This is the reference line 26 with the reference points 27. This is shown in FIGS. 1, 6 and 7. These reference points must be aligned by means of a chart in order to properly read the code. As illustrated the code markings are shown as a line producing printing elements 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58 and 59. The principal elements in this code that may be used independently are every alternate one or 53, 55, 57 and 59. The code may use any one of the principal elements which would provide in itself four distinct code characters. When the code characters or element 53 has 54 formed therewith a long symbol is provided. This long symbol may be used in combination with 57 and 59 or in combination with 56 plus 57 or with 58 plus 59. However, each element and code character when made up should, of course, be spaced from the next code character in order to provide a clear reading of the code. In this manner the code may be expanded and as illustrated in FIG. 6 the code character or element 53 is of the first order whereas the combination of 53 and 54 is of the second order and so on, to the seventh order which represents a continuous line from 53 to 59 inclusive.

It will be noted particularly in FIGS. 6 and 7 that the initial code marking 53 is aligned horizontally with the upper reference dot 27; whereas the last space between the code mark 59 and the lower dot 27 is always maintained vacant or stopped short. In this manner the code may always be readily recognizable and read from this alignment and accordingly on the chart shown in FIG. 8.

Another important feature is the fact that the reference dots 27 and the continuous reference line 26 together with each of the code markings 53 to 59 represent very small or narrow printing surfaces preferably aligned. The reference dots 27 are slightly larger than the reference line and are preferably retained small enough that they will not be distinguishable in case of showing through the tinplate from the strip 30 and in order to read the code it is necessary to remove the tin and check the marking with the chart to determine the identity of that particular piece of material.

In the modification of FIG. 7 two reference lines 26 and 26 are provided on the annular band here shown with their reference dots 27 and 27. Here again the initial mark is similar to that shown in FIG. 6 and is likewise numbered 53 and starts initially in line with the center of the two reference dots 27 and 27'. The next is a small dot which would be similar to 27 although this is a code mark and is marked as 60. The following code mark as indicated at 61 are two sloping parallel lines and the last code character as indicated at 62 is a short arcuate line. These different code characters are merely representative of other types of code marking that can be employed for this purpose.

Referring to FIG. 8, a selected code is printed on a transparent sheet as a comparative chart which is set up to illustrate FIGS. 1 through 9 and 0. Of course, the code employed on each tinplate line may be two or more selected of these numbers or characters to indicate the company; the line of the mill in that company and even a possible date of marking. As illustrated two reference lines 26 are provided for each printing number because this number may occur on either side of the reference. The printing band is not indicated because this is a chart. The characters representing spaces 53 to 59 are also each representative of the first order in seven positions. Any two adjacent positions provide a. character of the second order such as 64 as indicated in FIG. 6. Any three adjacent positions represent a character of the third order indicated at 63 in FIG. 6 and so on to the seventh order. Thus the code combines the order with the position yet only a line with a reference point is required to read the same. The selection here employs the code characters 53 and 57 to indicate numbers one to four and third order characters 63 are employed to indicate numbers six, seven, nine, and zero. A combination of first and third order characters are used to indicate numbers five and eight. Number one employs characters 53 and 57. Number two employs characters 53 and 55. Number three employs character 53 alone. Number four employs characters 55 and 57. Number rfive employs the code character 53 of the first order in combination with the code character of the third order of 55, 56 and 57 combined. Number six employs as the combination two second orders the first being 53 and 54 combined and the second being 56 and 57 combined. Seven in turn employs the combination of the second order being 54 and 55 combined whereas eight employs the combination of the third order combining 53, 54 and 55 taken with the first order of 57. Nine employs the third order combining 55, 56 and 57 and zero employs the third order combining 53, 54 and 55.

It is obvious from the foregoing chart that many combinations such as 58 and 59 have not been employed which in combination with the code characters 53 to 57 would greatly increase the number of characters available. The chief advantage here is that this may be limited only to a lineal or line length and the position thereof with respect to a reference point. By the use of these code characters and code characters such as illustrated in FIG. 7 or any other suitable character a simplified marking may be adopted to give the full history which would be etched on the surface of the strip 30 before it is tinplated and with this line etching it would not show through or be otherwise offensive to the interior or exterior of the container made from the finished tinplate product. It would always be necessary to remove the tinplate and apply the chart to read the code and determine the origin and complete history of the product.

I claim:

1. The method of establishing a code comprising the step of printing on material a series of lineally and uniformly spaced vertical parallel reference lines with limiting space therebetween for letter and character code mark means and uniformly spaced dots on each of said vertical parallel reference lines which limit the vertical extent of each letter and character of said code mark means in each series and vertically aligned lines of different lengths and parallel to and positioned between adjacent of said parallel reference lines for each used letter and character of said code, each dot providing the starting reference for each adjacent code mark means therebelow, the length and position of each letter line relative to its own reference starting dot determining said code.

2. The method of claim 1 which also includes the step of printing on a transparent sheet a series of lineally and uniformly spaced vertical parallel reference lines with limiting space therebetween for letter and character code mark means and uniformly spaced dots on each of said vertical parallel reference lines which limit the vertical extent of each letter and character of the code mark means in each series, and printing vertically aligned lines of different lengths and parallel to and positioned between adjacent of said parallel reference lines and dots for each letter and character depicting a selected code matching the printed vertical aligned lines of different lengths of the printed code, applying the transparent sheet of said selected printed code on the material to read when viewed therethrough each of the superimposed matching characters thereof.

3. The method of claim 2 which also includes the step of inverting the transparent sheet to match-read directly on a code producer to read the characters thereof.

4. An identifying code printed on strip material when manufactured and later read from divided pieces of said material, consisting of a series of lineally and uniformly spaced vertical parallel reference lines limiting the space therebetween for each letter and character code mark means in said series, uniformly spaced dots on each of said vertical parallel reference lines limiting the vertical extent of each letter and character of said code mark means in said series, vertically aligned lines of different lengths and parallel to and positioned between adjacent of said parallel reference lines for each letter and character of said code mark, each dot providing the starting reference for each adjacent code mark means therebelow, the length and position of each letter line relative to its own reference starting dot determining said code.

5. The code system of claim 1 characterized in that said uniformly spaced dots on said parallel reference lines are also printed in lateral alignment on the material.

'6. The code system of claim 1 characterized in that said vertically aligned lines for selected of said letters and characters of said code mark means includes a series of vertically spaced characters of different shapes and sizes in associated relationship with its respective reference dot.

7. A comparative chart to match-read a printed code on material and determine the identity of the same consisting of a transparent sheet having a laterally arranged reference means printed across said tarnsparent sheet to match a selected one of comparable reference means duplicated longitudinally on the material in conjunction with printed code indicia associated with its duplicated reference means on the material when viewed through said transparent chart, and code indicia printed longitudinally on said transparent sheet relative to its associated lateral reference means to translate the representative of each code character by viewing the superimposed match reading of each code character on said transparent sheet with the comparable code character on the material.

8. A comparative chart to match-read a printed code on material and determine the identity of the same consisting of a flexible thin sheet with transparent characteristics, a laterally arranged reference means printed across said transparent sheet to match a selected one of comparable reference means duplicated longitudinally on the material in conjunction with printed code indicia associated with its duplicated reference means on the material when viewed through said transparent chart, and code indicia printed longitudinally on said transparent sheet relative to its associated lateral reference means to translate the representative of each code character by viewing the superimposed match reading of each character on said transparent sheet when flexed to match-read the comparable code character on the material.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,535,066 4/1925 Vahjen 352 1,889,920 12/1932 Hurns et al. 352 2,344,585 3/1944 Bailey 352 2,390,439 12/1945 Johnson 352 X 2,684,853 7/1954 Withers 3535 X 2,784,392 3/1957 Chaimowicz 197-1 X 2,952,080 9/ 1960 Auakian et a1 352 3,211,470 10/1965 Wilson 283-18 3,402,482 9/1968 Rankin 3531.5

EUGENE R. CAPOZIO, Primary Examiner W. W. NIELSEN, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R. 283-47

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1535066 *Apr 4, 1923Apr 21, 1925Vahjen Marie ADevice for secret writing
US1889920 *Nov 22, 1930Dec 6, 1932Remington Rand IncCard interpreter
US2344585 *Aug 28, 1943Mar 21, 1944IbmDevice for analyzing perforated data appearing in adjacent fields of record media
US2390439 *Feb 2, 1943Dec 4, 1945IbmOptical record interpreter
US2684853 *Sep 1, 1950Jul 27, 1954Withers Raymond AChance selection word game
US2784392 *Jan 22, 1953Mar 5, 1957Bull Sa MachinesData recording system
US2952080 *Sep 12, 1957Sep 13, 1960Teleregister CorpCryptic grid scrambling and unscrambling method and apparatus
US3211470 *Jul 2, 1963Oct 12, 1965Gift Stars IncCoded coupon
US3402482 *Dec 8, 1966Sep 24, 1968Joanne S. RankinMathematics teaching device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5321749 *Sep 21, 1992Jun 14, 1994Richard VirgaEncryption device
US5398283 *Nov 3, 1993Mar 14, 1995Krypto Fax Partners L.P.Encryption device
US6373947Oct 13, 2000Apr 16, 2002Aliroo Ltd.Document processing
USRE33610 *Dec 28, 1989Jun 11, 1991Takata Inc.Spring-loaded hinge assembly for vehicle accessories
USRE33631 *Dec 28, 1989Jul 9, 1991Takata Inc.Spring-loaded hinge assembly for vehicle accessories
WO1994007326A1 *Sep 20, 1993Mar 31, 1994Richard VirgaEncryption device
Classifications
U.S. Classification380/54, 283/17
International ClassificationB41M1/26, B41M1/28, B41F17/00
Cooperative ClassificationB41M1/28, B41F17/00
European ClassificationB41F17/00, B41M1/28