Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3543421 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 1, 1970
Filing dateFeb 17, 1969
Priority dateFeb 17, 1969
Also published asCA921252A1
Publication numberUS 3543421 A, US 3543421A, US-A-3543421, US3543421 A, US3543421A
InventorsAder Gary B
Original AssigneeSports Technology
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adjustable stop for pivoted cuff
US 3543421 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' Dec. 1, 1970 a. as. ADER ADJUSTABLE STOP FOR PIVOTED CUFF 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 17, 1969 I INVENTOR.

irrakmsys Dec. 1, 1970 a. B. ADER ADJUSTABLE STOP FOR PIVOTED CUFF 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 17, 1969 United States Patent 3,543,421 ADJUSTABLE STOP FOR PIVOTED CUFF Gary B. Ader, Eden Prairie, Minn., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Sports Technology, Inc., Eden Prairie, Minn., a corporation of Delaware Filed Feb. 17, 1969, Ser. No. 799,572

Int. Cl. A43b US. C]. 36-25 14 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A quick adjustable stop means for a pivoting cuff on a ski boot to prevent rearward movement, and which can be quickly adjusted externally of the boot.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Field of the invention The present invention relates to improvements in ski boots having pivoted cuffs and particularly to a boot utilizing a back stop member to prevent rearward pivoting beyond a predetermined position.

Prior art SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to an external stop for rearward stopping of the pivotal movement of a ski boot cuff. More particularly, the invention provides for a quickly adjustable rearward stop positioned externally of the boot at the rear portions of the cuff. Further, the stop can be released quickly to make walking easier by permitting pivoting of the upper portions of the boot rearwardly beyond the desired skiing position.

The structure as shown has a resilient bumper to prevent hammering of the stop in sudden rearward pivoting. The stop may be used in combination with a resilient element that resiliently resists forward pivoting of the ankle cuff.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of a ski boot utilizing a stop mechanism made according to the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a rear elevational view of the device of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view taken as on line 33 in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view of the rear portions of a ski boot having a modified form of the back stop of the present invention installed thereon;

FIG. 5 is a view of the device of FIG. 4 showing it in a disengaged position to permit flexing of the cuff for easy walking;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a further modified form of the present invention;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the device of FIG. 6 showing the stop in released position; and

FIG. 8 is a sectional view taken as on line 88 in FIG. 6.

"ice

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS A ski boot 10, as shown, is of the type having a lower boot portion 11, and a cuff portion 12 pivotally mounted to the lower portion about a transverse axis 13. The pivot mounting is made with suitable pins or members for permitting the cuff portion 12 to move about axis 13 relative to the lower portion 11 so that the leg of a wearer can bend at the ankle. The boot has a door 14, as shown, for permitting foot access into the interior thereof and the door is attached with a hinge 15 to the main part of the boot. The cuff portion 12 is separate from the bottom portion 11, and its lower outline is shown in dotted lines in FIG. 1, and also fragmentarily in FIG. 3. The cuff portion comprises two parts that separate about the hinge axis of hinge 15 to permit a foot to be inserted into the boot. The door line is also shown in FIG. 1.

A cover member 16 is provided to cover the opening between the lower boot portion and the cuff portion, and the door is held closed with a pair of cables 17 and 18, respectively, that substantially encircle the boot and are fastened with suitable clamps 19 and 20. Cable 18 encircles the cuff and cable 17 encircles the lower portion of the boot. This cable and clamp arrangement is shown in more detail in United States Pat. No. 3,313,046. The boot is lined with suitable padding as shown at 23 to make the boot fit comfortably.

The cuff portion 12 is made so that it can pivot with respect to the lower part of the boot, and the cover 16 permits this pivotal movement. The boot, as shown, includes an elastic or resilient tension member 24 that resiliently urges the cup portion 12 in a rearwardly direction, or in other words in direction as indicated by the arrow 25 in FIG. 1. The elastic member 24 is fastened with a suitable fastener clip 26 to the cuff portion, at the rear of the boot, and also with another clip 27 to the lower part of the boot. The elastic tension member 24 is made of a sufficient stiffness to resist the forward pivoting movement of the cuff so that when the skier leans into the cuff he will feel some resistance to this movement.

When an elastic member 24 is used, in particular, it is desired many times to have a preload on the elastic member. This means that if a skier is to pivot forwardly from a normal position he would have to always overcome the force exerted by member 24. In order to prevent the rearward pivoting of the cuff beyond a predetermined point, stop members have been found to be very effective. Also, in many cases the angular positioning of the cuff should be changed quickly. The present device in its first form includes a stop assembly 28. The stop assembly includes an abutment member 29 fixed to the lower part of the boot, as shown in FIG. 3 and positioned externally of the boot. This abutment member 29 includes a stop or abutment surface 30. A stop device member 31 is fixedly attached to the cuff portion of the boot as shown in FIG. 3 and is positioned externally of the boot. The stop device 31 has an adjustable stop member or bumper 32. The bumper 32 is made of an elastomeric material of relatively hard durometer, but with sufficient resilience so that it does not damage the abutment surface when it stops against the abutment surface. The bumper includes a threaded shank 33 that is threadably mounted in the lower end of the stop device 31. A lock nut 34 is provided so that the bumper 32 can be adjusted to a particular position by threading the shank 33 until the cuff portion is at the predetermined angular position about its pivot axis 13 with respect to the lower part of the boot, and then looking it in position with a knurled lock nut 34. Then, when the cuff portion pivots forwardly to the dotted position shown in FIG. 1, the pumper will be raised from the surface 30, and when the cuff portion moves back it will strike the surface 30 and hold the cuff portion in a predetermined maximum position of rearward pivoting. The bumper can be quickly adjusted While the boots are on the feet, without opening the boot or taking the foot out of the boot. The skier can do this by merely loosening the lock nut 34, threading the bumper to its desired position, and then again tightening the lock nut.

Referring now to FIG. 4, the modified stop of the present invention is shown. The boot again has a cuff portion 12 and a lower portion or shell 11 of the first form of the invention. These are shown fragmentarily. The resilient member can be used if desired. An abutment 29 is fastened onto the shell 11 as in the first form of the invention. The cuff is pivotally mounted to the shell and is made so that it can be pivoted forwardly as previously described. The modified stop assembly illustrated generally at 40 is fastened onto the cuff 12. The cables 17 and 18 and cover 16 have been omitted for the sake of clarity. The modified stop assembly comprises a mounting stud or bolt 41 which passes through the cuff assembly, and is suitably fastened to the cuff assembly in the form shown. A metal liner forming part of the cuff hinge assembly is inside the cuff and the stud is spot welded to this metal liner. It could be adhesively fastened into place, or molded into place as desired. The stud 41 has a shank portion 42 and a threaded portion 43. The shank portion 42 is of larger size than the threaded portion, and is square in cross section, as shown. A back stop member 44 is provided with a socket or receptacle that fits over the stud 41, and in particular mates with the shank portion 42 so that the stop member 44 is held in position with a bumper 45' in line with the abutment member 29 and the abutment surface. The bumper 45 is mounted onto a threaded rod 46 that is threadedly mounted in the stop member 44 for adjustment purposes. The shank portion 42 of the stud 41 could be splined if desired, but should have definite holding positions to prevent rotation of the stop member with respect to the stud when the shank 42 and mating receptacle in the stop member mate.

When the stop member 44 is in place over the stud, and is locked into position by the mating shank 42 and receptacle in the stop member, a nut 47 is threadedly mounted onto the threaded portion 43 of the stud and is tightened sufliciently so that the stop member 44 is held from turning with respect to the stud and is held snugly against the cuff portion 12. The bumper 45 is then positioned so it will strike the abutment surface and hold the cuff in stopped position when the cuff is pivoted rearwardly, but will permit the cuff to be pivoted forwardly from this position. The resilient member is shown schematically in these views.

Referring now to FIG. 5, when it is desired to release the rearward stop, the nut 47 is loosened so that the stop member 44 can be displaced outwardly along the stud until the receptacle in the stop member 44 clears the shank 42. Then the stop member 44 can be rotated, as shown, 180. The shank is again engaged with the receptacle in the stop member to hold the stop member in an upright position as shown. The nut 47 is again tightened to secure the stop member in this position. Then the cuff 12 can pivot about its hinge axis in either direction of pivoting to make walking in the boots more comfortable. The cuff will have no definite stopped position about its pivot axis. When the stop is again to be used the nut 47 is merely loosened, the stop member slid off the shank 42 and rotated 180 back to its original position as shown in FIG. 4. The nut 47 is then again tightened and the stop is ready to function. The cuff will pivot forwardly from its stopped position as in the first form of the invention. It should be noted that in rotating the stop member 44 it is necessary to pivot the cuff forward slightly to provide clearance for the bumper to rotate. If a splined shank is used, the stop can be placed at a number of angular positions about the axis of the stud. Relief grooves may be provided in the stop member 44 and abutment 29 to clear cables 17 and 18 if the cables and cover 16 are to be used.

A still further modified version of a quick release stop member is shown in FIGS. 6, 7 and 8. Here, too, the cables 17 and .18 and cover 16 are omitted, but can be used merely by providing relief grooves for the cables in the mounting members. An abutment member 55 is mounted on the lower boot portion 11, and the stop device assembly 56 is mounted onto the cuff portion 12 of the boot. The stop device assembly in this form of the invention includes a mounting block 57 that is fixed to the cuff portion 12. The mounting block is provided with a vertically extending groove or slot 58. The slot is formed by a pair of spaced apart parallel legs 59, 59. A stop member 60 is mounted onto a cross pin 61 that extends through the legs,59, 59. The pin is mounted through a cross slot 62 in stop member 60 (see FIG. 8), and a coil spring 63 is mounted in a provided hole inside the stop member 60 and abuts against the cross pin 61. The coil spring 63 exerts a resilient upward force on the stop member 60 which urges the stop member in an upward direction. The stop member 60 includes a pair of ears 64- at its lower end that fit within provided receptacles on the legs 59, 59 (only one ear 64 is shown, but there is one on each side of the stop member). The ears 64 fitting within the receptacles keep the stop member in position. The spring 63 holds the ears 64 in the receptacle so that the stop member does not move with respect to the mounting block 57 when it is in working position as shown in FIG. 6. A rubber bumper 65 is mounted on a shank that is threadedly mounted into the lower portions of the stop member 60.

The stop member 60 is used for adjusting the position of the cuff 12 with respect to the base 11 as in the previous forms of the invention, and when the bumper strikes the abutment member 55, the stop will hold the cuff section 12 in its predetermined position about its pivot axis against further rearward pivoting.

When the stop member is not used, as for example when walking in the boot, the cuff 12 is pivoted forwardly by the wearer, and the stop member 60 is moved downwardly in the direction as indicated by the arrow 66 against the action of the spring 63 until the stop member has moved sufficiently so that the ears 64 clear the slots in the legs 59, 59. At that time, the stop member will have moved sufficiently so that it can swing outwardly about the pin 61. It will then be released. The spring 63 will urge the stop member upwardly until pin 61 bottoms in slot 62. The ears 64, 64 will then strike the outer edges of the legs 59, 59 as shown in FIG. 7 and the bumper member 65 will then clear the abutment 55. Then the cuff 12 can pivot rearwardly about its pivot axis past the normally stopped position. When the stop is again to be used, it is merely again moved downwardly against the action of the spring 63 until the ears will clear the bottom of the legs 59, 59 and then the stop member is moved until the ears 64 again engage their receptacles. The stop is then held positively positioned with respect to the abutment in the predetermined skiing position.

All forms of the stop are quickly theadably adjustable. The second and third forms of the invention are shown without locknuts on the threaded shank, but of course such locknuts can be used.

The stop members all can be used on boots having a resilient member 24. Also, the stop member can be used on leather boots as well as synthetic boots, and can be used on boots having conventional foot access openings as well as hinged doors.

Thus, a. quick adjustment is easily made, the devices are relatively inexpensive to manufacture, and the resilient bumper prevents the stop from being hammered out of shape and prevents great rearward shocks from occurring to the skier when the cuff portion pivots rearwardly. The resilient member, of course, exerts a rearward pivoting force so that there is a tendency for the stop members to strike very hard. The resilient bumper prevents any damage to the parts, cushions the shock, and yet provides a positive stop that is easily adjusted.

The abutment member could be formed as an integral part of the boot, for example, molded into the boot base portion to form an abutment surface. In the forms of the invention shown in FIGS. 4-8, the cuff portions are pivotally mounted as in the first form of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. In a ski boot having a boot base portion, an upper boot ankle cuff portion pivotally mounted to the base portion for pivotal movement about an ankle pivot, the improvement comprising stop means for limiting rearward pivotal movement of said cuff portion about said ankle pivot including an abutment member mounted on one of said boot portions, a stop device, means mounting the stop device on the other boot portion, said stop device including a stop member positioned to engage said abutment member to limit rearward pivotal movement of said cuff portion, said stop device and abutment member being mounted at the rearmost portions of the ski boot substantially midway between the lateral sides of the boot, and on the exterior thereof.

2. In a ski boot having a base portion, and an upper boot ankle cuff portion pivotally mounted to the base portion for pivotal movement about an ankle pivot, the improvement comprising stop means for limiting rearward pivotal movement of said cuff portion about said ankle pivot including an abutment member on one of said boot portions, a stop device, means mounting the stop device on the other boot portion, said stop device including a stop member comprising a resilient bumper positioned to engage said abutment member to limit rearward pivotal movement of said cuff portion.

3. The improvement of claim 2 wherein said stop member is threadably adjustable, and locknut means is provided on said threadably adjustable stop member to lock said stop member in position.

4. The combination as specified in claim 2 and a resilient tension member positioned adjacent the rear of said boot on the interior thereof, means attaching said resilient tension member between the base portion of the boot and the cuff portion so that said resilient tension member exerts a resilient force resisting forward pivotal movement of said cuff portion with respect to said base portion.

5. The combination as specified in claim 4 wherein said abutment member includes an abutment surface positioned to interfere with movement of said bumper as the cuff portion pivots in a rearward direction.

6. The combination as specified in claim 4 wherein said bumper is made of an elastomeric resilient material.

7. In a ski boot having a boot base portion, and an upper boot ankle cuff portion pivotally mounted to the base portion for pivotal movement about an ankle pivot, the improvement comprising stop means for limiting rearward pivotal movement of said cuff portion about said ankle pivot including an abutment member mounted on one of said boot portions, a stop device, means mounting the stop device on the other boot portion, said stop device including a stop member positioned to engage said abutment member to limit rearward pivotal movement of said cuff portion, said stop member being adjustable with respect to other portions of the stop device to change the position of said cuff portion about its pivot when said stop member engages said abutment member.

8. The combination as specified in claim 7 wherein said abutment member is mounted on said boot base portion.

9. In a ski boot having a boot base portion, and an upper boot ankle cuff portion pivotally mounted to the base portion for pivotal movement about an ankle pivot, the improvement comprising stop means for limiting rearward pivotal movement of said cuff portion about said ankle pivot including an abuntment member mounted on one of said boot portions, a stop device, means mounting the stop device on the other boot portion, said stop device including a stop member positioned to engage said abutment member to limit rearward pivotal movement of said cuff portion, said means mounting said stop device comprising releasable means to permit moving said stop device to a position wherein the stop member clears said abutment member when the cuff portion is moved rearwardly about the ankle pivot past its normally stopped position.

10. In a ski boot having a cuff portion movable with respect to a base portion to permit movement of the cuff portion when a wearer of the boot moves his lower leg, the improvement comprising stop means to limit rearward movement of said cuff portion, means to position said stop means on the exterior of the boot at the rear portions thereof, said stop means comprising cooperating members positioned to normally stop movement of said cuff in rearward directions beyond a preselected position, said mounting means including disabling means to render one of said cooperating members ineffective to stop rearward movement of said cuff at said preselected position.

11. In a ski boot having a cuff portion movable with respect to a base portion to permit movement of the cuff portion, the improvement comprising stop means to limit rearward movement of said cuff portion, means to position said stop means on the exterior of the boot at the rear portions thereof, said stop means comprising cooperating members positioned to normally limit movement of said cuff in rearward direction, said mounting means including releasable means to permit moving one of said cooperating members to a release position wherein said one member no longer cooperates with the other member to limit rearwardly movement of said cuff.

12. The device of claim 11 wherein said mounting means for said one member comprises a mounting stud, said releasable means holding said one member in a plurality of angular positions about the axis of said stud.

13. The device of claim 11 wherein said mounting means for said one member includes a pin pivotally mounting said one member, said releasable means holding said one member in cooperating position with the other member and being releasable to permit movement of said one member about said pin to said release position.

14. The device of claim 13 wherein said mounting means for said one member includes a housing, said pin pivotally mounting said one member to said housing, and said releasable means comprises interlocking means between said housing and said one member to hold said one member in a desired position with respect to said housing.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,239,952 3/1966 Lange et al. 362.5 3,303,584 2/1967 Werner et al. 36-2.5 3,313,046 4/1967 Werner et al. 36-2.5

PATRICK D. LAWSON, Primary Examiner mg UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION 3,5431421 Dated December 1, 1971 Patent No.

Inventor-(s) Gary B. Ader e above-identified patent It is certified that error appears in th wn below:

and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as she Column 6, line 21 before "means" add -mounting-- Column 6, line 33, before "means" add "mounting",

Signed and sealed this 30th day of March 1971.

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD M.FLETCHER, JR. WILLIAM E. SCHUYIER, JR Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3239952 *Feb 24, 1965Mar 15, 1966Philo B LangeSki boot
US3303584 *Dec 24, 1964Feb 14, 1967Rosemount Eng Co LtdEdging adjustment for ski boots
US3313046 *Mar 31, 1965Apr 11, 1967Rosemount Eng Co LtdSki boot improvements
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3686778 *Dec 15, 1970Aug 29, 1972Rieker & Co JustusSki boot or shoe
US3722112 *Feb 18, 1971Mar 27, 1973RiddellSki boot construction
US3728804 *Jul 9, 1971Apr 24, 1973Hope KkSki boot
US3735508 *Sep 28, 1971May 29, 1973Gertsch AgSki boot having a stiffening sleeve
US4050716 *Mar 19, 1976Sep 27, 1977Tmc CorporationSki binding
US4096651 *Aug 13, 1976Jun 27, 1978Per AnckerSki boot
US4138828 *Jul 5, 1977Feb 13, 1979Tmc CorporationSki boot
US4379370 *May 4, 1981Apr 12, 1983Nordica S.P.A.Device for adjusting the inclination of the cuff or ankle covering portion of a footwear article, in particular a ski boot
US4499676 *Dec 2, 1982Feb 19, 1985Lange International S.A.Ski boot
US4565017 *Oct 26, 1984Jan 21, 1986Ottieri EnterprisesSki boot
US4575958 *Jul 30, 1984Mar 18, 1986Lange International S.A.Ski boot
US4669202 *Sep 28, 1984Jun 2, 1987Ottieri EnterprisesSki boot
US4932143 *Aug 29, 1989Jun 12, 1990Lange International S.A.Ski boot
US4962595 *Sep 11, 1989Oct 16, 1990Koflach Sport Gesellschaft M.B.H. & Co. KgSki shoe
US4991319 *Sep 11, 1989Feb 12, 1991Koflach Sport Gesellschaft M.B.H. & Co. KgSki shoe
US5031341 *Dec 13, 1989Jul 16, 1991Salomon S.A.Rear-entry ski boot
US5136794 *Mar 14, 1991Aug 11, 1992Lange International S.A.Ski boot
US5276982 *Jul 11, 1991Jan 11, 1994Koflach Sport Gesellschaft M.B.H. & Co. KgDevice for adjusting the forward lean of the upper of a ski boot
US5408762 *Nov 30, 1992Apr 25, 1995Dynafit Skischuh Gesellschaft M.B.H.Adjustment system for ski boots having an articulated collar
US5832635 *May 14, 1997Nov 10, 1998Items International, Inc.Highback
US6076287 *Apr 29, 1998Jun 20, 2000Shimano Inc.Stance-support attachment for freestyle snowboard boot
US6178665Jun 12, 1997Jan 30, 2001Macpod Enterprises Ltd.Fit and support system for the foot
US8062243 *Jun 30, 2008Nov 22, 2011Anatomical Concepts, Inc.Orthotic device for a pivoting joint of the human body
EP0149445A1 *Dec 4, 1984Jul 24, 1985Koflach Sportgeräte Gesellschaft m.b.HSki boot with a shell and an upper portion pivoting relatively to this shell
EP0177269A2 *Sep 26, 1985Apr 9, 1986Ottieri EnterprisesSki boot
EP0549558A1 *Nov 26, 1992Jun 30, 1993DYNAFIT SKISCHUH GESELLSCHAFT m.b.H.Adjusting system for ski boots
EP0688510A1May 30, 1995Dec 27, 1995NORDICA S.p.ADevice for adjusting the position of a quarter with respect to the shell of a sports shoe
EP0689777A1Jun 1, 1995Jan 3, 1996Lange International S.A.Ski boot
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/118.8
International ClassificationA43B5/04
Cooperative ClassificationA43B5/0456
European ClassificationA43B5/04E14F1