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Publication numberUS3543484 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 1, 1970
Filing dateMay 24, 1968
Priority dateMay 24, 1968
Publication numberUS 3543484 A, US 3543484A, US-A-3543484, US3543484 A, US3543484A
InventorsEdwin R Davis
Original AssigneeEdwin R Davis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fuel vapor adsorbing apparatus
US 3543484 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 1, W70 E. R. DAVIS FUEL VAPOR ADSORBING APPARATUS Filed May 24, 1968 United States Pate O 3,543,484 FUEL VAPOR ADSORBING APPARATUS Edwin R. Davis, 2020 Beverly Plaza 213, Long Beach, Calif. 90815 Filed May 24, 1968, Ser. No. 731,758 Int. Cl. B0111 39/00 U.S. Cl. 55-387 ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A fuel vapor adsorbing apparatus to prevent emission to the atmosphere of residual fuel vapors from a service station storage tank when such tank is filled. The adsorbing apparatus includes a hydrocarbon adsorbing means having its inlet connected with the upper portion of the storage tank whereby vapors expelled during filling of the storage tank will be passed through the adsorbing means to remove hydrocarbons therefrom to prevent emission to the atmosphere.

This invention relates to a vapor emission prevention and conservation system for motor vehicle fueling stations which will prevent the emission of hydrocarbon vapors to the atmosphere from such stations.

The emission of unburned hydrocarbon vapors to the atmosphere is known to be an undesirable source of air pollution. When hydrocarbon fuels are pumped into servvice station fuel supply tanks or into motor vehicle fuel tanks the liquid displaces vapors within such tanks which are customarily vented to the atmosphere. These vapors contain considerable amounts of hydrocarbon.

The object of this invention is to pass all vented vapors from such fueling operations through an adsorber wherein the hydrocarbon constituents are adsorbed in a suitable adsorbent material, thereby preventing their emission to the atmosphere.

Other objects will be apparent from the description, drawings and appended claims.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a schematic view of a fuel vapor adsorbing apparatus embodying the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a detailed view, partially broken away, of a modification of the adsorbing means included in the apparatus shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view, in enlarged scale, of the outlet of the adsorbing means shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a vertical sectional view of a coupling means for installation on the spout of a motor vehicle fuel tank; and

FIG. 5 is a vertical sectional view of a second embodiment of a coupling means for installation in the fuel spout of a vehicle fuel tank.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In the drawing, FIG. 1 is a diagram of one arrangement of a fuel receiving, storing and dispensing system which provides for adsorption of displaced hydrocarbon vapors. To fill the fuel supply tank 1, the delivery truck tank 2 is connected to tank 1 by line 3 containing pump 4 and valve 5. Liquid fuel entering tank 1 via line 3 displaces vapors containing hydrocarbons some of said vapors flowing via line 6 to tank 2 and excess vapors, which are generated due to agitation of the liquid fuel, flowing via lines 7 and 8 to adsorber 9, thence via line 10 to adsorber 11, thence via line 12 to the atmosphere. Valve 13 in line 7 is normally closed, but for emergency use or to provide for maintenance may :be opened thereby permitting flow to or from the atmosphere via line 7 and 3 Claims Too pressure/vacuum relief valve 14. Vapors passing through identical adsorbers 9 and 11 contact granulated charcoal or other suitable material, which will adsorb hydrocarbon vapors while permitting air to pass through the adsorbent bed 15.

To fill a motor vehicle fuel tank 16, liquid fuel flows through line 17 containing pump 18 and terminating in a suitable vapor-recovery type fuel tank connection '19. Vapors displaced from fuel tank 16 flow via line 20 to line 7, thence via line 7 to fuel supply tank 1. Excess vapors generated by agitation, thermal changes, etc. flow via lines 20, 7 and 8 to adsorbers 9 and 10 wherein hydrocarbons are adsorbed as described above.

When the adsorber material in adsorber 9 is saturated, the cannister 21, which contains the saturated adsorbent material, is replaced with identical cannister from adsorber 11 and a cannister containing fresh or regenerated adsorbent material is installed in adsorber 11. This procedure provides a 2-stage adsorber wherein the second stage adsorber 11 always contains a less saturated adsorbent material than the first stage adsorber 9. This arrangement represents two stages of counter-current action, thereby providing for efficiency.

Cannisters containing saturated adsorbent material may be collected from many locations and taken to a centrally located facility for regeneration of the saturated adsorbent material, regeneration being accomplished by stripping hydrocarbons from the adsorbent material by passing superheated steam through it, with subsequent recovery of condensed hydrocarbon liquids.

FIG. 2 shows an alternate construction of adsorber wherein the adsorber consists solely of a removable cannister 22 filled with an adsorbent material. Canisters like 22 can be used in place of cannisters 9 and 11 to provide a similar multistage arrangement.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged view of the inlet 23 or outlet 24 of cannister 22 showing a screen 25, which may be arranged in a conical or other suitable configuration, and which serves to retain the adsorbent material within the cannister.

FIG. 4 shows a motor vehicle fuel tank cap 25 with integral vacuum/pressure relief valve 26 and gasket 27 assembled and attached to the motor vehicle fuel tank inlet nozzle 28. This fuel tank cap prevents over or underpressurizing fuel tanks which have no open vent to the atmosphere, such tanks being desirable to facilitate displacement of vapors only to the vapor recovery system. This fuel tank cap also serves to maintain a vapor pressure slightly above atmospheric pressure in the fuel tank, thereby reducing the amount of vaporization of hydrocarbons during operation of the motor vehicle and/or when it is at rest.

FIG. 5 shows a vapor recovery type motor vehicle fueling connection wherein a normally open-to-atmosphere vent hole 29 in the motor vehicle fuel tank inlet nozzle 30 is blocked and effectively closed by the flexible insert 31, which is integral with the connector 32 when during fueling operations, said connector 32 is attached to the nozzle 31 in line of a fuel tank cap. During fuel operations, liquid fuel enters the tank via fuel hose spout 33 and displaced vapors exit from the tank to a vapor hose attached to hose connection 34 via holes 35, annular passage 36, and hole 37.

I claim:

1. Fuel vapor adsorbing apparatus comprising:

a fuel storage tank;

fuel vapor adsorbing means having an inlet and an exhaust port;

a conduit connecting said storage tank with said vapor adsorbing means inlet;

an automobile filling hose connected on one end with said storage tank and including coupling means on its opposite end for being coupled with the filling spout of an automobile fuel tank; and a vapor return line connected on one end with said coupling means and on its opposite end with the upper portion of said storage tank whereby the vapor expelled from the automobile fuel tank during filling thereof may be returned to said storage tank and passed through said adsorbing means to adsorb the hydrocarbons therefrom to prevent emission into the atmosphere. 2. Fuel vapor adsorbing apparatus as set forth in claim 1 for use with an automobile including a fuel tank spout having a vent port near the mouth thereof and wherein:

said coupling means closely interfits said spout to seal said vent port to prevent escape of vapors therethrough.

3. Fuel vapor adsorbing apparatus comprising:

a fuel storage tank;

fuel vapor adsorbing means having an inlet and an exhaust port;

a conduit connecting said storage tank with said vapor adsorbing means inlet;

a fuel transfer line connected on one end to said storage tank and adapted to be connected on its opposite end to a truck tank;

a vapor return line for connecting the upper portion of said storage tank with the upper portion of said truck tank; and

an automobile filling hose connected on one end with said storage tank and including coupling means on its opposite end for being coupled with the filling spout of an automobile fuel tank whereby vapor may be communicated between said storage tank and truck tank and any excess vapor may be passed through said adsorbing means to adsorb the hydrocarbons therefrom to prevent emission into the atmosphere.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,789,654 4/1957 Zurit 387 3,257,773 6/1966 Connors et a1. 55-33 3,289,711 12/1966 Hall 55-387 3,352,294 11/1967 Biller et al. 55387 REUBEN FRIEDMAN, Primary Examiner C. N. HART, Assistant Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R. 141-286

Patent Citations
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US3257773 *Apr 29, 1963Jun 28, 1966Phillips Petroleum CoDehydration of gas for recovery of helium therefrom
US3289711 *Dec 13, 1965Dec 6, 1966Walker BrooksDevice for controlling the hydrocarbon evaporation losses from automotive vehicles
US3352294 *Jul 28, 1965Nov 14, 1967Exxon Research Engineering CoProcess and device for preventing evaporation loss
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3776283 *Jun 15, 1972Dec 4, 1973Gulf Research Development CoVapor recovery system
US3815327 *May 14, 1973Jun 11, 1974C VilandMethod and apparatus for preventing loss of hydrocarbons to atmosphere
US3854911 *Apr 13, 1971Dec 17, 1974Walker BPressure fuel tank evaporation control
US3863687 *May 4, 1972Feb 4, 1975Phillips Petroleum CoReturn of vapor condensate formed in dispensing vaporous liquid
US3867111 *Aug 29, 1973Feb 18, 1975Shell Oil CoVapor recovery system
US3880317 *Mar 2, 1973Apr 29, 1975Ford Motor CoInlet insert
US3897193 *Sep 27, 1973Jul 29, 1975Shell Oil CoVapor recovery and disposal system
US3902874 *Dec 13, 1973Sep 2, 1975Shell Oil CoVapor recovery and disposal system
US3918932 *Mar 6, 1974Nov 11, 1975Environics IncMethod and apparatus for collecting and disposing of fuel vapors
US3926230 *Jun 12, 1974Dec 16, 1975Edward L BrownRecovery of flammable vapors
US3979010 *Jul 12, 1974Sep 7, 1976Daimler-Benz AktiengesellschaftFuel tank for a motor vehicle
US4025324 *Sep 8, 1975May 24, 1977Texaco Inc.Hydrocarbon vapor control unit and system
US4138880 *May 27, 1977Feb 13, 1979The United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator Of The U.S. Environmental Protection AgencyVapor emission recovery and measuring method and vapor recovery collection boot
US4276058 *Aug 26, 1980Jun 30, 1981John Zink CompanyProcess and apparatus for recovering hydrocarbons from air-hydrocarbon vapor mixtures
US4331456 *Jun 27, 1980May 25, 1982John Zink CompanyProcess for recovering hydrocarbons with air-hydrocarbon vapor mixtures
US4338101 *Aug 3, 1981Jul 6, 1982John Zink CompanyProcess and apparatus for recovering hydrocarbons from inert gas-hydrocarbon vapor mixtures
US4343629 *Feb 5, 1981Aug 10, 1982John Zink CompanyProcess and apparatus for recovering hydrocarbons from air-hydrocarbon vapor mixtures
US4598741 *Sep 21, 1984Jul 8, 1986D. C. Johnson & Associates, Inc.Barrier vapor control system
US4770677 *Mar 31, 1986Sep 13, 1988Stant Inc.Vapor recovery system
US4795050 *Jan 12, 1987Jan 3, 1989Stant Inc.Two-stage fuel cap
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Classifications
U.S. Classification96/131, 141/392, 141/285, 96/145, 141/52, 141/286
International ClassificationB65D90/30, B65D90/22, B67D7/04, B67D7/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D90/30, B67D7/0476
European ClassificationB65D90/30, B67D7/04C