Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3545008 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 8, 1970
Filing dateMay 27, 1968
Priority dateMay 27, 1968
Publication numberUS 3545008 A, US 3545008A, US-A-3545008, US3545008 A, US3545008A
InventorsKarl F Bader Jr
Original AssigneeKarl F Bader Jr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tendon prosthesis
US 3545008 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 8, 1970 UER; JR 3,545,008-

TENDON PRQSTHESIS Filed May 27, 1968 i .v awn roe.

iw/ F 491; /l:

United States Patent O 3,545,008 TENDON PROSTHESIS Karl F. Bader, In, Chicago, Ill. (2300 N. Rockton Ave., Rockford, Ill. 61101) Filed May 27, 1968, Ser. No. 732,404 Int. Cl. A61f 1/24 US. Cl. 3-1 6 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A tendon prosthesis for use in tendon surgery particularly where there is complete or extensive loss of the tendon, structurally including an elongated member made from a flexible, chemically inert material having at least one flap at each end adapted to overlap the tendon and means for firmly anchoring the prosthesis to the tendon providing a strong, functional anastamotic union.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION 14 at each end adapted to overlap a repaired or reconstructed tendon 16. In addition a suture material 18 is incorporated within the elongated member 12 and each flap 14 has a mesh or netting 20 on its inner surface as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2.

As shown in the figures the tendon prothesis 10 is preferably an elongated member 12, however, it may be fabricated to any desired size and shape. The elongated member 12 is preferably fabricated from a sheeting material and may be reinforced as shown in FIG. 2 by a Dacron mesh 15 or similar material. The reinforcing increases the strength of the elongated member and prevents stretching during suture attachment. In addition, the elongated member 12 may be modified by the doctor sculpturing it to any desired size and shape at the time of surgery.

It is extremely important that the material used to form the elongated member 12 be substantially inert to prevent foreign body reactions. In addition the material must be compatible with the physiological processes of the human body and preferably has nonwetting surfaces which minimize sticking or encrustation. Further the material A further object is a full-function tendon prosthesis which is able' to withstand full Weight bearing capacity without separation or deformity.

Another object is a tendon prosthesis which is chemically inert and demonstrates a very low order of reactivity eliminating any incapacitating foreign body reactions.

Another object is a versatile tendon prosthesis which is adaptable to a variety ofclinical situations including instances of soft tissue avulsion, severe infection, electrical burn and surgical resection.

Another object is an improved tendon prosthesis which substantially eliminates adhesions and allows the patient to regain full range of motion including the ability for full active extension and flexion.

Another object is a tendon prosthesis which may be easily positioned and one positioned moves through the surrounding tissue with little resistance.

Another object is an improved method of constructing a strong and durable tendon prosthesis which necessitates no further surgical operations.

Other objects and advantages will be apparent from the ensuring specification and drawing for this invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring to the drawing in more detail it will be seen that this invention basically includes an elongated member 12 made from a substantially inert material having flaps should contain the quality of nonadherence to tissue and is preferably resistant to adsorption, hardening and degeneration. A flexible silicone elastomer manufactured by Dow Corning sold under the trademark Silastic has been found to substantially meet the above mentioned qualifications. In addition other medical-grade silicone elastomers, or material similar to Silastic or equivalents thereof have been found as satisfactory material for the elongated member 12.

As best shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 a suture material 18 may be fabricated within the elongated member 12 by bonding two or more layers of sheeting material around the suture material. The ends of the prosthesis 10 are then spread apart to form a pair of flaps 14 for overlapping the repaired or reconstructed tendon. On the inside surface of each flap 14 there is secured a mesh or netting 20 formingsuitable end plates for tendon anastamosis. The flaps 14 with the mesh or netting 20 are devised to facilitate rapid and accurate areas of anastamosis with minimal exposure.

It is important that the mesh or netting 20 be made from a material or materials that cause fibroblastic infiltration to occur between the severed ends of the tendon 16 and the mesh 20 therebyfirmly anchoring the prothesis 10 With a strong, functional anastamotic union. One such material is polyester, however, similar materials or equivalents thereof have been found as a satisfactory mesh materal.

FIGS. 3 and 4 show how the suture attachment is performed in more detail. The flaps 14 overlap the tendon 16 with the mesh material resting against the outer surface of the tendon while the suture material 18 may be attached to each end of the tendon as shown in these figures. It should again be noted that the suture material 18 runs the full-length of the prosthesis 10 providing a strong durable means for attaching the prosthesis. The fibroblastic infiltration which occurs between the severed tendon 16 and the mesh 20 of each flap insures a strong, functional anastamotic union.

The use, operation and function of this invention are as follows:

The results from experiments and clinical use of this invention have been very favorable. The tendon prosthesis 10 allows the patient to regain essentially full range of motion within a short time after cast removal. In addition the prosthesis does not cause restrictive adhesions, infections or extrusions. Further, the tendon prosthesis can withstand full weight bearing capacity with no gross deformity including the ability for full active extension and flexion.

On reexploration of experimental uses of this inven tion each of the tendon prostheses were in good position and completely covered with a layered fibroblastic membrane. This delicate membrane was vascularized and substantially resembled normal synovial tissue. In fact the appearance of the entire tendon prosthesis is very similar to a normal tendon.

Functionally, the tendon prosthesis, and to a lesser degree its fibroblastic membrane, were found to move through the surrounding tissue with very little resistance. When the membrane was dissected, the respected tendon ends were noted to be firmly anchored to the prosthesis by the mesh material of the end flaps 14. In addition the membrane encasing, caused by the material of the elongated member, extended distally and around the normal tendon to reinforce the anastamosis.

It should be emphasized that the tendon prosthesis 10 was designed primarly as a full-function tendon after only one surgical procedure. Further surgical operations such as revision or replacement are not contemplated with this invention. However, it may be noted that if separation of an anastamosis did occur, it could be removed easily and the reactive membrane formed around the prosthesis could be utilized as a sheath for an autologous graft.

I claim:

1. A tendon prosthesis for replacement of the damaged portion of a tendon as a full-function tendon including:

an elongated member made from a flexible substantially inert material that is compatible with the physiological processes of the human body;

a pair of flaps in opposed relationship at each end of the elongated member, said flaps being integral withv the elongated member and having an inside surface for enveloping the severed ends of the tendon and an outside surface designed for movement in the surrounding body tissue;

a mesh material secured to the inside surface of each flap adapted to contact only the severed ends of the tendon to form .a strong, functional anastamotic union, said mesh material being separated from the surrounding body tissue by the flaps; and

suture means running longitudinally the full-length of the prosthesis and extending beyond the end flaps for initially attaching the prosthesis to the tendon.

2. The structure of claim 1 further characterized in that the elongated member including the end flaps is made from a nonwetting, nonreactive material.

3. The structure of claim 1 further characterized in that the elongated member including the end flaps is made from a medical-grade silicone elastomer.

4. The structure of claim 1 further characterized in that the elongated member including the end flaps is reinforced with a mesh material to increase its strength.

5. The structure of claim 1 further characterized in that the mesh material is made from a polyester adapted to cause fibroblastic infiltration therethrough, thereby anchoring the prosthesis to the severed ends of the tendon.

6. In a tendon prosthesis for use in repairing a damaged tendon, the process of making the prothesis including the steps of:

bonding together a plurality of layers of medical-grade silicone elastomer sheeting over a suture material ex tending length-wise therein;

fabricating an elongated member from the medicalgrade silicone elastomer sheeting;

separating the distal ends of the prosthesis to a desired length to form end flaps having an inner surface and an outer surface, said inner surface being adapted to overlap the severed tendon;

placing a polyester mesh on the inner surface of each end flap for contacting only the severed ends of the tendon and thereby being separated from the surrounding body tissue by the end flap; and

bonding the polyester mesh to the inner surface of each end flap.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,176,316 4/1965 Bodell 3-1 3,197,788 8/1965 Segger 31 OTHER REFERENCES RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner R. L. FRINKS, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3176316 *Jan 7, 1963Apr 6, 1965Bruce R BodellPlastic prosthetic tendon
US3197788 *Apr 23, 1962Aug 3, 1965Inst Of Medical SciencesProsthetic valve for cardiac surgery
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3665520 *Oct 7, 1970May 30, 1972Medical Eng CorpSurgically implantable breast prosthesis
US3745590 *Jun 25, 1971Jul 17, 1973Cutter LabArticulating prosthesis with ligamentous attachment
US3805300 *Jul 28, 1972Apr 23, 1974Cutter LabTendon prosthesis
US3882551 *Jan 9, 1974May 13, 1975Battelle Memorial InstituteArtificial muscle
US3886600 *Sep 26, 1973Jun 3, 1975Cutter LabJoint prosthesis
US3971670 *Jul 17, 1974Jul 27, 1976Homsy Charles AImplantable structure and method of making same
US4128100 *Oct 8, 1976Dec 5, 1978Wendorff Erwin RSuture
US4246660 *Dec 26, 1978Jan 27, 1981Queen's University At KingstonArtificial ligament
US4255820 *Jul 24, 1979Mar 17, 1981Rothermel Joel EArtificial ligaments
US4469101 *Jun 7, 1982Sep 4, 1984Battelle Memorial InstituteSuture device
US4578080 *Sep 8, 1983Mar 25, 1986Helal Basil HJoint prostheses
US4605414 *Jun 6, 1984Aug 12, 1986John CzajkaReconstruction of a cruciate ligament
US4775380 *Oct 16, 1986Oct 4, 1988Seedhom Bahaa BSurgical replacement of ligaments
US4979956 *Jul 10, 1989Dec 25, 1990Pfizer Hospital Products Group, Inc.Device and method for tendon and ligament repair
US5049155 *Aug 16, 1990Sep 17, 1991W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc.Prosthesis for tensile-load-carrying tissue and method of manufacture
US5061283 *Nov 15, 1990Oct 29, 1991Pfizer Hospital Products Group, Inc.Method for tendon and ligament repair
US5197983 *Aug 20, 1991Mar 30, 1993W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc.Ligament and tendon prosthesis
US5258040 *Feb 28, 1991Nov 2, 1993W. L. Gore & AssociatesProsthesis for tensile load-carrying tissue and method of manufacture
US5586545 *Oct 2, 1995Dec 24, 1996Mccaslin; John A.Compressed gas gun
US5800544 *Dec 4, 1995Sep 1, 1998Omeros Medical Systems, Inc.Tendon and ligament repair system
US6080192 *May 28, 1998Jun 27, 2000Omeros Medical Systems, Inc.Tendon and ligament repair system
US6106556 *Oct 29, 1998Aug 22, 2000Omeros Medical Systems, Inc.Tendon and ligament repair system
US6322571Apr 5, 1999Nov 27, 2001Brian D. AdamsApparatus and method for placing sutures in the lacerated end of a tendon and similar body tissues
US6342060 *Aug 20, 1999Jan 29, 2002Brian D. AdamsTendon passing device and method
US6592622 *Oct 24, 2000Jul 15, 2003Depuy Orthopaedics, Inc.Apparatus and method for securing soft tissue to an artificial prosthesis
US6872227 *Dec 11, 2000Mar 29, 2005Ethicon GmbhStrip-like implant
US6986751Oct 31, 2003Jan 17, 2006Cabg Medical, Inc.Grafted network incorporating a multiple channel fluid flow connector
US6991615Aug 2, 2004Jan 31, 2006Cabg Medical, Inc.Grafted network incorporating a multiple channel fluid flow connector
US7001429Jun 17, 2003Feb 21, 2006Depuy Orthopaedics, Inc.Method for securing soft tissue to an artificial prosthesis
US7011643Aug 5, 2003Mar 14, 2006Cabg Medical, Inc.Grafted network incorporating a multiple channel fluid flow connector
US7229453 *Dec 31, 2002Jun 12, 2007Ams Research CorporationPelvic floor implant system and method of assembly
US7691114 *Nov 9, 2000Apr 6, 2010Renaud DucheDevice for protecting nerves after surgical procedure
US7972360 *Oct 2, 2007Jul 5, 2011Dean John CMethod for use in repairs of injured soft tissue
US8226716 *Jan 14, 2010Jul 24, 2012Depuy Mitek, Inc.Method and apparatus for fixing a graft in a bone tunnel
US8333803 *Nov 19, 2009Dec 18, 2012Lifecell CorporationReinforced biologic material
US8465515 *Aug 29, 2007Jun 18, 2013Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Tissue retractors
US8808301Aug 7, 2009Aug 19, 2014University Of South FloridaRapid custom intra-articular ligament reconstruction guide
US9351719Oct 31, 2013May 31, 2016Zone 2 Surgical, Inc.Self locking knotless suture
US9421306Sep 14, 2012Aug 23, 2016Lifecell CorporationReinforced biologic material
US9539004Mar 7, 2014Jan 10, 2017Zone 2 Surgical, Inc.Collapsible locking suture
US9642661Dec 2, 2013May 9, 2017Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcMethod and Apparatus for Sternal Closure
US9649189 *Aug 11, 2011May 16, 2017Arthrex, Inc.Reinforced biological construct and method of reinforcing biological construct
US20030004580 *Dec 11, 2000Jan 2, 2003Raimo SumpStrip-like implant
US20030216809 *Jun 17, 2003Nov 20, 2003Ferguson Joe W.Method for securing soft tissue to an artificial prosthesis
US20040228411 *Sep 16, 2003Nov 18, 2004Sony CorporationMethod and system for decoder clock control in presence of jitter
US20050033218 *Oct 31, 2003Feb 10, 2005Villafana Manuel A.Grafted network incorporating a multiple channel fluid flow connector
US20050033219 *Aug 2, 2004Feb 10, 2005Villafana Manuel A.Grafted network incorporating a multiple channel fluid flow connector
US20080058867 *Oct 2, 2007Mar 6, 2008Dean John CMethod for use in repairs of injured soft tissue
US20100106254 *Oct 9, 2009Apr 29, 2010Delsignore Jeanne LSurgical implantable stabilizer sling for basal joint arthroplasty
US20100121448 *Jan 14, 2010May 13, 2010Depuy Mitek, Inc.Method and apparatus for fixing a graft in a bone tunnel
US20100161054 *Nov 19, 2009Jun 24, 2010Jason ParkReinforced Biologic Material
US20100286775 *Oct 12, 2008Nov 11, 2010Tavor [I.T.N] Ltd.,Ligament and Tendon Prosthesis
US20120046746 *Aug 11, 2011Feb 23, 2012John KonicekReinforced biological construct and method of reinforcing biological construct
US20130144310 *Jun 6, 2012Jun 6, 2013Core Essence Orthopaedics, Inc.Method and apparatus for repairing a tendon or ligament
US20140094913 *Dec 3, 2013Apr 3, 2014Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcScaffold For Spring Ligament Repair
US20140277447 *Dec 3, 2013Sep 18, 2014Biomet Sports Medicine, LlcScaffold For Spring Ligament Repair
EP0080510A1 *Jun 8, 1982Jun 8, 1983Kenneth Z KurlandBioprosthesis.
EP0080510A4 *Jun 8, 1982Jun 6, 1985Kenneth Z KurlandBioprosthesis.
EP0172279A1 *Aug 13, 1984Feb 26, 1986John Augustin JurgutisHuman ligament replacement
Classifications
U.S. Classification623/13.15, 128/DIG.210
International ClassificationA61F2/08
Cooperative ClassificationA61F2/08, Y10S128/21
European ClassificationA61F2/08