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Publication numberUS3545469 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 8, 1970
Filing dateJun 7, 1968
Priority dateJun 7, 1968
Publication numberUS 3545469 A, US 3545469A, US-A-3545469, US3545469 A, US3545469A
InventorsCissell Harry L
Original AssigneeCissell Harry L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid proportioner
US 3545469 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Harry L. Cissell 46705 No. 70th E., Lancaster, Calif. 93534 [21] Appl. No. 735,353 [22] Filed June 7, 1968 [45] Patented Dec. 8, 1970 [54] LIQUID PROPORTIONER 10 Claims, 4 Drawing Figs.

[52] US. Cl ..137/101.27, 119/78,137/386,137/412, 137/428, 137/446, 222/57 [5] Int. Cl ..G05d 11/00, F 16k 31/18 [50] Field of Search 1 19/78 (Medbery):137/99.5,101.25,l01.27,386, 412; 222/57(Lane); 210/121 3,181,731 5/1965 222/57 3,353,549 11/1967 Walker et al. 137/10l.25 FOREIGN PATENTS 567,242 12/1958 Canada l37/l0l.25

Primary Examiner-William F. ODea Assistant Examiner-David .l. Zobkiw Attorney-William H. Maxwell ABSTRACT: This invention relates to improvements in the proportioning of liquids wherein one fluid is the vehicle and the other fluid is the concentrate having special utility by virtue of its chemical and/or biological properties. A continuously operating batching apparatus is involved and the improvements reside in the positive control over the concentrate fluid as it is measured and added to the vehicle fluid that is gauged, the fluids being measured and gauged accurately and 1 References Cited adjusted as circumstances require. Generally, the concentrate UNITED STATES PATENTS fluid of known values is added by measure to a gauged 1,577,157 3/1926 Averill 137/101.25 volume of vehicle fluid and the admixture is contained in a 2,578,387 12/1951 Albertsonm. 137/99.5X reservoir from which it is drawn as circumstances require. 2,758,716 8/1956 Oswald l37/101.27 It is the new and positive and adjustable admixture control 2,944,560 7/1960 Vis 137/10l.25 over both fluids which is provided.

36 X s A; 7

fl p a 28 s M -71 lz and chemicals in general, by employing water, for example, as t the vehicle. Therefore, in large poultry raising facilities the waterer systems are employed to distribute medication designed to aid in the health and well being of the poultry throughout a ranch. For example, one or more liquid proportioners of the type here under consideration is installed at the water source and operated to administer medication or the like evenly throughout the entire waterer system. The poultry drink from the common ,waterer, system and are thereby furnished with a discriminate dosage, all of which is predetermined by the person setting up the apparatus. For example, sanitizing fluids for improving poultry water are obtainable in different concentrations with certainrequirements for its further dilution into the drinking water or vehicle fluid. Therefore, it is an objective and function of the apparatus to measure the additive concentrate fluid while simultaneously gaging the water vehicle fluid.

I-Ieretofore, difficulty has been experienced with this type of liquid proportioner for the reason that flooding can and does occur. That is, the reservoir containing the admixture can and is often filled beyond capacity, resulting in an unwanted deluge and/or with an improper mixture, all as the result of a nonpositive correlation between measurement of the concentrate fluid and gaging of the vehicle fluid. Therefore, it is a pri} mary object of this invention to provide a positive correlation between said measurement andsaid gaging, the gaging means being alternately operable to start and stop the mixing of a gaged volume of the vehicle fluid in timed relation to the dispensing of a measured volume of the concentrate fluid.

A universal condition with water supplies for operations of the type under consideration is that the pressure or volume, or both, is in excess of the use requirement. Consequently, a flow control must be provided, and such a control is ordinarily a valve with a suitable operating mechanism that is sensitive to the use requirement. It has been experienced that the success of the liquid proportioner being considered hinges greatly upon the operation of this valve as related to gaging the vehicle fluid and measuring the concentrate fluid admixed thereto. Therefore, another object of this invention is to combine the positive correlative action of said measurement and gaging with the starting and stopping of the vehicle fluid, all of which is accomplished in a direct and reliable manner eliminating all possibility of flooding and avoiding the risk of improper ratios of fluid admixture.

The various objects and features of this invention will be fully understood from the following detailed description of the typical preferred form and application thereof, throughout which description reference is made to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. I is a vertical sectional view of the apparatus as it appears during operation, with the reservoir of liquid at the high level.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged detailed view of the measure and gaging means, as it is shown at the top of FIG. 1

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken as indicated by line 3-3 on FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a view similar to a portion of FIG. 1, showing the measure in its dumping position as a result of the reservoir liquid reaching the low level.

Thisliquid proportioner is applicable to poultry operations and the like and is intended for the dissemination of material through the waterer systems that are usually employed, or through any like systems. It is general knowledge, for example, that poultry must be supplied with drinking water and it is usual practice to supply troughs and/or drinking cups by means of suitable piping (not shown). Thus, and in order to supply the above-mentioned troughs and/or cups, the water must be pumped or otherwise directed into the piping and this function is ordinarilyperformed at acommon water source. Therefore, it is thissource of supply water, under a substantially sufficient supply pressure, that is to be treated and admixed with the required concentrate fluid, the admixture being delivered into the piping of the waterer system per se.

The liquid proportioner involves, generally, a reservoir R, a concentrate tank T, a frame A, a measure M, a float F, a supply valve V, and a measure and gaging means X correlating these foregoing elements. Briefly, the reservoir R is a tank into which the vehicle fluid and concentrate fluid are charged for admixture, the tank T being provided for containing a supply of concentrate fluid. The frame A is adaptable to the reservoir R and tank T to support the gaging means X that operatively carries the float F and measure M and which combines operation thereof with operation of the supply valve V, a positive relationship which will be hereinafter described.

The reservoir R that is charged with the two fluidsis advantageously formed of a commercially available drum from which the top end is removed. As shown, the drum is concentrate and is vertically disposed. Thus, transported fluids are received into the top of the reservoir, and a discharge line 10 emanates from the bottom of the reservoir. A pump P is indicated for discharging a uniform volume per time flowof processed fluid from the reservoir.

The concentrate tank T'that contains the useful fluid to be admixed to the vehicle fluid is located at or next adjacent to the reservoir Rso that the concentrate fluid therefrom can be easily transported into the reservoir. It is preferred that the concentrate tank T be dropped into the top open end of the reservoir R and suspended by the rim of the reservoir to occupy half the cross-sectional area thereof, and to this end the tank T is an upwardly opening half-cylinder having a transverse diametrically disposed wall 11. The capacity of tank T is limited as compared to the size of reservoir R, as permitted by the concentration of fluid contained therein, and can be substantially shallow with a bottom 12 that remains above the high level of fluid contained in reservoir R. As will be seen with the means M, itis advantageous to provide the tank T with a depending and imperforate well 13 centrally located adjacent to the wall 11, the wellbeing of sufficient depth to fully accommodate the measure M and guiding tracks for the same.

The frame A guides the measure M and supports the gaging means X which operatively carries both the float F and measure M. The frame A can vary in form and is preferred to be an open framework rested upon the rim of the reservoir R. As shown, the frame extends transversely across the center of the reservoir R at a right angle to the wall 11 and thereby extends over the concentrate tank T and its well 13, there being vertically disposed and parallel tracks 14 depending from the frame and into the well 13. Theframe carries a notched part that locates over the wall 1 1 to properly position the tracks 14. Projecting vertically from the frame there is a header 15 that supports the gaging means M, the header 15 being centered to project centrally above the wall 11. In practice, the header 15 is alined with the plane of the wall 1 1, and the end of the frame remote from the portion overlying tank T is adapted to carry the supply valve V.

As shown in the drawings, the supply valve V is a normally closed, electrically operated solenoid valve actuated to open by means of electrical energy supplied through lines 16. As indicated, the supply valve V is connected to a source of clean water under pressure and it has a downwardly open discharge fitting 17 that profusely distributes water downwardly and into the reservoir R.

The measure M is a small vessel of predetermined volume and which is vertically disposed when lowered into the well 13, and mounted to turn to a horizontal disposition when raised to the top of the tank T. The measure M is weighted so that it will submerge when pennitted to fall by gravity. The tracks 14 slideably guide a carriage 20 which embraces the measure M and which pivotally supports the measure M on an axis 21 parallel to the wall 11. The carriage has a connecter 22 at its upper end and the axis 21 is spaced away from the wall 11 and center of measure M so that the measure is overbalanced to fall away from said wall. A strap 24 on the carriage receives and stops the weighted side of the measure M when it is erect and positions it free of walls 13 and 11. The top edge of wall 11 has a lip projecting toward the measure M, and the bottom of the measure is provided with a finger 18 to engage the lip and thereby overbalance the measure so that it falls onto the rim of the wall 11 in order to dump its contents into the reservoir R.

The float F is a controlling element of the apparatus and is weighted so as to exceed the weight of the measure M when it is filled. However, the float F is sufliciently bouyant to rise with facility when the level of fluids and/or liquid rises in the reservoir R. As shown, the float F is a cylindrical cell with ballastat its lower end and with a connecter 23 at its upper end.

In accordance with the present invention, 1 provide the measure and gaging means X that correlates the action of the above described elements, namely the action of the float F and measure M, and the operation of the supply valve V. It is the measure and gaging means X which operatively carries the float F and measure M and which combines operation thereof with operation of the supply valve V. As shown, the means X is rotatably journaled on a horizontal axis by the frame header and comprises generally, a control disk 25, drive means 30 revolving the disk and elevating the measure M in response to the position of the float F, and limit means 35 opening and closing the valve V in response to the low and high positions of the float respectively. For instance, a normal variation between low and high levels of fluid admixture or liquid in the reservoir R can be 1 1 inches, in which case the float F falls and rises that distance. However, this distance can be adjusted to more or less as circumstances require, through selective adjustment of the limit means 35. It is the maximum fall and rise of the liquid level which determines the lift motion on the measure M, the header extending to sufficient height so as to rotatably carry the control disk 25 out of reach of any contamination from concentrate fluid in tank T which could be transferred by wetting of the drive means 30.

The control disk 25 and drive means 30 are characterized by their combined positive function of following the position of float F for the positioning of limit means 35 and simultaneous lifting of the measure M. In practice, a sprocket and chain drive is employed, in which case the control disk 25 is a sprocket and the drive means 30 is a chain, it being feasible to engage the sprocket disk 25 and chain drive means 30 at a; predetermined invariable relative positioning. That is, the rotative position of the sprocket disk 25 and the reciprocal position of the chain drive means 30 are matched, as by locat ing a marked link 31 of the chain at an indicator mark 26 on the sprocket. With the relationship of parts as described, and with a given length of chain drive means 30 coupled at one end to the connecter 23 of the float F, and trained over the sprocket disk 25, and coupled at the other end to the con necter 22 of the carriage 20, the drive means 30 is operative to positively revolve the control disk 25 in response to the liquid level in reservoir R.

The limit means 35 that is operative to open and close the valve V is responsive to the low and high positions of the float F, and comprises spaced stops 36 and 37 moving with the control disk 25 and/or drive means 30. In the preferred form, the stops 36 and 37 are carried by the sprocket disk 25 to move with the invariably engaged elements 25 and 30, being mounted radially inward of the toothed perimeter to project from one face of said disk. In practice, a normal placement of the stops 36 and 37 is on radials that are angularly spaced to intersect the pitch diameter of the sprocket with an intermediate arc of said normal 1 1 inches. The two stops 36 and 37 are thereby accurately spaced to oppose each other, there being an electrical switch 38 in the line 16 to the solenoid valve V and operable to alternate positions through alternate operative engagement of the stops therewith. Switch 38 is a toggle switch with a projecting lever 39 that is reciprocably operable between on and off positions. Snap switches of this general description are commercially available in many forms,

and it is a simple matter to place the lever 39 in the path of the stops 36 and 37 so as to be alternately moved into on and off positions, the on position responsive to engagement by the stop 36 and the off position responsive to the stop 37.

In accordance with the invention, the stops 36 and 37 are selectively adjustable so that the normal ll inch rise and/or fall of liquid in the reservoir R can be gaged and for the accurate dispensing of concentrate from the measure M. Therefore, the stops 36 and 37 are mounted to the control disk 35 by means of circumferentially slotted tabs, with set screws, that permit accurate adjustment thereof. It is a simple matter to place the stops to best advantage, thereby calibrating the apparatus to the fluids that are admixed and effecting most efficient dumping of the measure M.

In order to place the apparatus into operation it is merely necessary to establish the combination of elements as hereinabove set forth, connecting the supply pipe of the valve V to a source of vehicle fluid or water, and filling the concentrate tank T with the desired concentrate containing the materials to be proportioned into said vehicle. It will be apparent that the consistent rise and fall of liquid in the reservoir R determines batches of exacting volume, while each dumping of the measure M is also of an exacting volume. Therefore, the required admixture of vehicle and concentrate can be readily predetermined and maintained through the positive action of the measure and gaging means X which reliably senses the liquid levels in the reservoir R and correspondingly lifts and dumps the exacting amount of concentrate from the measure M. It is the positive action of the sprocket disk 25 and chain drive means 30 as combined with the limit means 35 that actuates the valve V and which makes for a reliable and practical liquid proportioner.

1 claim:

1. A liquid proportioner for the continuous batching admixture of a measure volume of concentrate fluid with a gaged volume of vehicle fluid and including, a reservoir open for the reception of vehicle fluid and concentrate fluid, said reservoir having an intake line for delivering the vehicle fluid into said reservoir and a discharge line for delivering the liquid admixture of said two fluids from said reservoir, an open concentrate tank for holding a supply of concentrate fluid, a weighted measure with a connecter guided to submerge into the concentrate tank, and means to dump the contents of the measure into the reservoir when lifted, a weighted float with a connecter, said float being located in a said reservoir, said float being substantially heavier than the measure and responsive to the level of the admixture of fluids, a measure and gaging means comprising a control disk with a drive element trained thereover to depend and couple to the connecters of the measure and the float respectively for reciprocal elevation of the measure upon movement of the float, and spaced stops moved with the control disk and drive element and alternately engageable with means opening a valve in said intake line to charge the reservoir with vehicle fluid when the float is lowered and closing thevalve when the float is raised.

2. The liquid proportioner as set forth in claim 1, wherein the control disk and drive element are positively interengaged and wherein the spaced stops are carried upon the control disk to alternately engage with the means opening and closing the valve when the float is lowered and raised respectively.

3. The liquid proportioner as set forth in claim 1, wherein the control disk and drive element are a sprocket and chain respectively and wherein the spaced stops are carried upon the control disk to alternately engage with the means opening and closing the valve when the float is lowered and raised respectively.

4. The liquid proportioner as set forth in claim 1, wherein the control disk and drive element are positively interengaged and wherein the spaced stops are circumferentially adjustable on the control disk to alternately engage with the means opening and closing the valve when the float is lowered and raised respectively.

5. The liquid proportioner as set forth in claim 1, wherein the control disk and drive element are positively interengaged and wherein the means opening and closing the valve is a switch engaged by the spaced stops carried upon the control disk to alternately open and close the valve when the float is lowered and raised respectively.

6. The liquid proportioner set forth in claim 1, wherein the control disk and drive element are positively interengaged and wherein the means opening and closing the valve is electrical with a solenoid operating the valve and an electrical switch engaged by the spaced stops carried upon the control disk to alternately open and close the valve when the float is lowered and raised respectively.

7. The liquid proportioner as set forth in claim 1, wherein the control disk and drive element are positively interengaged and wherein the means opening and closing the valve is electrical with a solenoid operating the valve and an electrical toggle switch having a lever engaged by the spaced stops carried upon the control disk to alternately open and close the valve when the float is lowered and raised respectively.

8. The liquid proportioner asset forth in claim 1, wherein the control disk and drive element are positively interengaged sprocket and chain elements respectively, and wherein the spaced stops are carried upon the control disk sprocket to alternately engage with the means opening and closing the valve when the float is lowered and raised respectively.

9. The liquid proportioner as set forth in claim 1, wherein the control disk and drive element are positively interengaged sprocket and and chain elements respectively, and wherein the means opening and closing the valve is a switch engaged by the spaced stops carried upon the control disk sprocket to alternately open and close the valve when the float is lowered and raised respectively.

10. The liquid proportioner as set forth in claim 1, wherein the control disk and drive element are positively interengaged sprocket and chain elements respectively, and wherein the means opening and closing the valve is electrical with a solenoid operating the valve and an electrical toggle switch having a lever engaged by the spaced stops carriedupon the control disk sprocket to alternately engage with the spaced stops to alternately open and close the valve when the float is lowered and raised respectively.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3870076 *Mar 26, 1973Mar 11, 1975Dacmont IncAutomatic liquid medicament mixer for treating animals
US4715398 *Oct 30, 1986Dec 29, 1987Cobe Laboratories, Inc.Liquid level control
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/101.27, 137/446, 119/78, 222/57, 137/412, 137/428, 137/386
International ClassificationG05D11/00, A01K39/00, A01K39/02
Cooperative ClassificationG05D11/001, A01K39/02
European ClassificationA01K39/02, G05D11/00B