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Publication numberUS3545684 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 8, 1970
Filing dateSep 22, 1967
Priority dateSep 22, 1967
Publication numberUS 3545684 A, US 3545684A, US-A-3545684, US3545684 A, US3545684A
InventorsJames R Hilmanowski, James G Ruspino
Original AssigneeWhirlpool Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Food waste disposer
US 3545684 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1113,545,684

[72 1 Inventors James 0. a ino 2,832,574 4/1958 Homberger 241 /36X St, Joseph, Michigan; 3,010,662 11/1961 Johnson 241/36 James R, l'lllmmowski, St, Paul, Minnesota 3,1 12,079 1 l/ 1963 Niekamp et a1... 241/36X [21 1 Appl. No. 669,776 3,204,879 9/1965 Reckers et a1. 241/36X [22] Filed Sept. 22,1967 3,210,014 10/1965 Nauman et a1.... 241/36X [45] Patented Dec. 8, 1970 3,291,399 12/ 1966 Shepherd 241/36 [73] Assignee Whirlpool Corporation 3,401,892 9/ 1968 Meyers 241/36 acm'porafion ofnglaware 3,415,378 12/1968 Fukuda 24l/46X [54] FOOD WASTE DISPOSER 5 Claims, 10 Drawing Figs.

[52] 11.8. C1 241/33, 241/36, 241/46 [51] Int. Cl. B02c 25/00 [50] Field ofSearch 241/36, 33, i 34, 46, 35; 146/251 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,551,395 5/1951 Rimann 241/36X 2,678,775 5/1954 Simmons 241/36X Primary Examiner-Frank T. Yost Attorneys-William Houseal, James S. Nettleton, Charles D. Putnam, Thomas E. Turcotte, Gene A. Heth, Burton H. Baker, Francis L. Snyder, Donald W. Thomas and l-lofgren, Wegner, Allen, Stellman and McCord ABSTRACT: A food waste disposer having a control for automatically controlling the operation of the disposer. The control includes structure for reversing the grinding means in the event the grinding means becomes jammed, and for terminating the operation of the grinding means of the disposer automatically upon completion of the grinding of food waste thereby.

PATENTEU on: 8 19m 5 2 SHEET 2 BF 2 1. FOOD WASTE DISPOSER This invention relates to control means and in particular to control means for use with apparatus such as a food waste disposer. v

In the conventional food waste disposer, means are provided for grinding food waste and flushing the ground food waste to a discharge. Conventionally, the grinding means is driven by a suitable electric motor, and switch means are provided for operating the motor to effect a grinding operation. The switch means conventionally comprises manually operable switch means arranged to be manipulated by the user to effect the desired grinding operation. In another form, means are provided responsive to the delivery of water from a suitable supply to the disposer for initiating and terminating operation thereof. The present invention comprehends an improved means for controlling the operation of such a food waste disposer providing an improved disposing operation with effectively minimum involvement by the user.

Thus, a principal feature of the present invention is the provision of a new and improved control means for use with a food waste disposer and the like.

Another feature of the invention is the provision of such a control means which is responsive to a condition of the grinding operation for terminating the operation of the disposer.

A further feature of theinvention is the provision of such a control means wherein the control means includes means for delivering flushing liquid to the grinding means for a preselected period of time.

Still another feature of the invention is the provision of such a control means wherein the control means includes means for delivering flushing liquid to the grinding means for a preselected period of time, and means for initiating operation of the grinding means after a preselected period of time of delivery of the flushing liquid.

A yet further feature of the invention is the provision of such a control means wherein the control means includes means for reversing the grinding means in the event the grinding means becomes jammed.

Yet another feature of the invention is the provision of such a control means including valve means controlled by said control means for controlling the delivery of flushing liquid to the grinding means.

Another feature of the invention is the provision of such a control means including valve control means for allowing flushing liquid to continue flowing for a predetermined time aftertermination of the grinding operation.

A yet further feature of the-invention is the provision of such a control means comprising means for sensing the presence of ground waste in the effluent being conducted from the grinding means.

Another feature of the invention is the provision of such a control means comprising means for sensing the noise level of the grinding operation and means for terminating the grinding operation upon a drop in thenoise level to a predetermined low level indicating completion of the grinding of the food waste.

A further feature of the invention is the provision of such a control means comprising means for sensing vibration generated during the grinding operation and means for terminating the grinding operation upon a drop in the vibration to a predetermined low level findicating completion of the grinding of the food waste.

Still another feature of the invention is the provision of such a control means wherein the control means is manually adjustable for presetting the length of the grinding operation as desired by the user.

Yet another feature of the invention is the provision of such a control means wherein photocell means are provided for sensing the presence of food waste material in the discharge liquid to control termination of the operation of the disposer.

A further feature of the invention is the provision of such a control means comprising a solid-state circuit means.

Other features and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing wherein:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary schematic elevation of a food waste disposer provided with a control means embodying the invention;

FIG. 2 is a schematic wiring diagram illustrating the electrical circuit of the control means;

FIG. 3 is a schematic wiring diagram of one alternate subcircuit which could be used with the basic electric circuit of FIG.

FIG. 4 is a schematic wiring diagram of another alternate subcircuit which could be used with the basic electric circuit of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary side elevation of a food waste disposer having another form of control means embodying the invention;

FIG. 6 is a schematic wiring diagram illustrating the electrical circuit of the control means of FIG. 5; 7

FIG. 7 is a schematic wiring diagram of one alternate subcircuit which could be used with the basic electrical circuit of FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is a schematic wiring diagram of another alternate subcircuit which could be used with the basic electrical circuit of FIG. 6;

FIG. 9 is a schematic wiring diagram of yet another subcircuit which could be used-with the basic electrical circuit of FIG. 6; and

FIG. 10 isa schematic wiring diagram of still another subcircuit which could be used with the basic electrical circuit of FIG. 6.

In the exemplary embodiment of the invention as disclosed in FIGS. 1 through 3, a domestic food waste disposer such as disclosed in US. Pat. No. 2,679,981 generally designated 10 is shown to comprise a grinding chamber 11 having an inlet 12 for introduction thereinto of food waste material. Thus, the disposer may comprise a disposer adapted to be installed in a kitchen sink having a bottom wall 13. Flushing water may be delivered from a suitable cold water supply line 14 into the grinding chamber 11 for flushing the ground waste material outwardly through a discharge 15. A grinding device (not shown) located within, grinding chamber 11 may be operated by a suitable electric motor 16. The invention comprehends the provision in the food waste disposer 10 of an improved control generally designated 17 for controlling the operation of the grinding device within grinding chamber 11 by motor 16 and the delivery of the flushing water thereto.

More specifically, control 17 comprises an electronic RC timer controlled by a manually settable switch 18 for adjusting the time of operation of the disposer 10 as desired by the user. In the illustrated embodiment, the control 17 operates a valve 19 for controlling the delivery-of the flush water from supply 14 through an inlet duct 20 to the grinding chamber 11 permitting the user to utilize the water tap (not shown) of the sink notwithstanding the operation of the disposer 10. The control 17 permits the user to set the time of operation of the disposer 10 corresponding to the amount of food waste material to be disposed of and thereby permits completion of the disposing operation without further attention by the user. More specifically, control 17 provides for automatic operation of the disposer 10 wherein delivery of flushing water to the grinding chamber 11 is first effected, after a predetermined period of time the motor 16 is energized to initiate a grinding operation, after a further period of time preselected in accordance with the setting of switch 18 the motor 16 is deenergized, and after a further predetermined period of time the delivery of flushing water to the disposer 10 is terminated.

Referring now more specifically to FIGS. 2 and 3, the electrical circuitry of the control 17 is shown to include a singlepole master switch 21 connected to one AC power supply lead L As shown in FIG. 2, the circuit elements are connected between switch 21 and the other AC power supply lead L After switch 21 is closed, the cycle of operation for the disposer is initiated by depressing a push-to-start switch 56. Current now fiows from lead L through switch 21, a resistor 58, and switch 57 to the gate electrode of a silicon controlled rectifier 25 having its anode connected through a relay coil 27, to switch 21, and having its cathode connected to lead L A diode 26 is connected across coil 27 to prevent chattering. With gating current supplied to controlled rectifier 25, it fires early in each positive half cycle of AC power. This energizes coil 27 to open its normally closed relay contact 56 and close its normally open relay contact 55, and the moving contact 46 associated relay switch 36 is transferred from a fixed contact 47 to a fixed contact 51. The closing of contact 55 bridges switch 57 which may now be released without interrupting gating current to controlled rectifier 25. The transfer of contact 46 to contact 51 allows current to flow to the gate electrode of a silicon controlled rectifier 43 from line L through switch 21, a resistor 37, contact 46, a resistor 54, a diode 56, and a diode 50. Thus, controlled rectifier 43 fires early in each positive half cycle of AC power and allows energization power to flow to a water valve solenoid S from line 1. through switch 21. A diode 45 is connected across solenoid S to eliminate chatter. Valve 19 (see FIG. 1) is now open and cold water flows into chamber 1 1 through inlet 20.

Current flowing from contact 51 also begins to charge a capacitor 380 through a diode 38c and a timing resistor 38b. After approximately 2 seconds, the voltage level on capacitor 38a reaches the zener voltage level of a zener diode 38. Current will now flow through diode 38 into a terminal of a control generally designated 60.

As shown in FIG. 3, terminal 39 is connected to the gate element of a triac 40 which is connected in series with the grinder motor 16 to a terminal 41connected to switch 21. Triac 40 is also connected to a terminal 42 which (see FIG. 2) is connected to power supply leadL With current passing through zener diode 38 to the gate of triac 40, it fires to energize motor 16 and initiate the grinding operation.

In order to terminate the grinding operation after a time preset by switch 18, a variable RC timing circuit is provided. Referring to FIG. 2, note that a moving contact arm 35 of a selector switch 18 maybe preset to any one of the fixed contacts 28, 29, 31 or 33. With arm 35 set to contact 29, 31 or 33, a timing resistor is respectively connected in series with either capacitor 30, 32 or 34. The capacitance values of capacitors 30, 32 and 34 are different to provide differing time periods before terminating the grinding operation. If arm 35 is connected to contact 28, the grinding operation will continue until terminated by the opening of switch 21.

Assuming that arm 35 has been preset to the position shown in FIG. 1, capacitor 32 will charge from line L through switch 21, diode 24 and resistor 22. After approximately seconds, the voltage across capacitor 32 reaches the breakover voltage of a unijunction transistor 22c and it fires a pulse through the base of a transistor 22c since contact 56 is open. This creates a voltage drop across a resistor 22b to drive a transistor 22d into conduction and shunt gate current away from controlled rectifier 25. Controlled rectifier 25 is now prevented from firing and relay coil 27 is deenergized This causes contact 55 to open and terminate the flow of any further gate current to controlled rectifier 25. Contact 56 also closes and shunts the charge on capacitor 32 to ground. Contact 46 moves from contact 51 to contact 47 to terminate the flow of gating current to triac 40 which deenergizes motor 16 and the grinding operation stops.

However, current will now flow to the gate of controlled rectifier 43 from contact 47 through a parallel connected capacitor 49 and bleed resistor 49 and through diode 50. This insures that solenoid S will remain energized for a predetermined time after the grinding operation stops to completely flush out chamber 11 and the drain line. After approximately 5 seconds, capacitor 49 charges to a level sufficient to block further gate current flow to controlled rectifier 43. The solenoid S is now deenergized and the disposers cycle of operation is complete.

The operating condition of the control 17 may be indicated by suitable neon lamp 52 connected in series with a suitable resistor 53.

Referring to FIG. 4, a modified control l40.which may be substituted for control 60 to provide for automatically terminating power to the start winding of the grinding motor 116 after it comes up to speed and automatically reversing it in the event of jamming during operation of the disposer is illustrated. As shown, the control may be connected between terminals 39, 41 and 42 in lieu of control 60 in the control 17. Thus when contact 46 of switch 36 is transferred to deliver power to terminal 39, as shown in FIG. 2, the connection of terminal 39 to the control element of a triac permits current to flow through themain winding 161 of a reversible motor 116 and the primary 162 of a low impedance transformer 163 from temrinal 41 and through a thermostatic safety switch 164 to terminal 42. The secondary winding 165 of transformer 163 is provided with a center tap lead 166 and the secondary winding voltage is fully rectified by diodes 167 and 168 connected in parallel across the secondary winding 165 and in series with a filtering capacitor 169 connected to lead 166. The filtered direct current immediately gates on a transistor 170 having its base connected through a network consisting of parallel connected capacitor 171 ad resistor 191 in series with a resistor 172 to a lead 173 connected between diodes 167 and 168 and capacitor 169..The base of a second transistor 174 is connected through a network consisting of parallel connected capacitor 175 and resistor 192 in series with a resistor 176 to lead 173. The current to the base of transistor 174 is shunted initially to lead 166 through a parallel connected capacitor 177 and resistor 193 thereby insuring that transistor 170 will saturate first. As transistor 170 is in saturation, a voltage drop is developed across resistor 176 to charge a capacitor 178 connected in parallel with resistor 176 through a resistor 179. This causes a unilateral breakover diode to break over and deliver a voltage pulse to the primary winding 180a of a pulse transformer. This voltage pulse initiates a corresponding voltage pulse across the pulse transformer secondary winding 18 0bconnected between the gate and cathode electrodes of a triac 181 connected in series with the clockwise auxiliary winding 182 of the motor 116 and triac 181 goes into conduction. Preferably the ohmic values of the resistors 176 and 179 and the capacitance of capacitor 178 are such as to insure that the diode 180 fires several times during each half-line cycle to assure the conducting condition of triac 181 early in each positive and negative half-line cycle.

As the motor 116 reaches normal operating speed, the voltage developed across its main winding 161 rises and the voltage across the primary 162 of transformer 163 drops correspondingly. The secondary voltage of transformer 163 correspondingly drops so that capacitor 178 charges insufficiently to fire the diode 180 and triac 181 becomes deenergized to prevent further current flow through the auxiliary, start, winding 182 of motor 116 to drop this portion of the motor winding out of the circuit.

However, in the event that the disposer motor 16 becomes jammed during the grinding operation, the stalling thereof causes an elimination of the back EMF across the main winding 161 whereupon the voltage across transformer primary 162 rises. After a period of time a capacitor 183 becomes charged through a resistor 184 thereby to apply a firing potential to a firing diode 185 connected through a resistor 186 between resistor 184 and capacitor 183. The firing of diode 185 delivers a pulse to the emitters of transistors 174 and 170 thereby driving the transistor 170 out of conduction and the transistor 174 into conduction. The collector of transistor 174 is connected through a capacitor 196 and a resistor 187 to lead 173 whereby capacitor 196 becomes charged and breaks over a firing diode 188 connected from between resistor 187 and capacitor 196 to provide a voltage pulse to a pulse transformer primary 188a which then transmits the voltage pulse to the pulse transformer secondary 18% connected from the gate to cathode electrodes of a triac 189. Triac 189 connected between a counterclockwise auxiliary drive winding 190 of the motor. 116. Assuming that the reversal of the motor 116 effectively unjams the. grinder, back EMF will again be generated in main winding. 161 and the voltage between lead 173 and lead 166 again drops thereby rendering triac 189 nonconductive and dropping out the auxiliary winding 190. However, if the grinding motor 116 remains jammed, the windings 182 and 190 will be alternately energized each time a triggering pulse is delivered through the firing diode 185, The attempted reversals of the motor will continue until the temperature condition of thernotor 116 sensed by switch 164 is sufficient to open the switch and thereby discontinue further operation of the disposer l0. 1 v i As shown in FIG-.4, a resistor 194 is connected between the base of transistor 170 and lead 166. The resistor-195 is connected between the emitters of transistors 174 and 170 and to lead 166. l 7

Thus control 17 may be-utilized with a unidirectional motor 16 with control elem nts 60 .to provide a unidirectional operation of the grinder 11. As indicated above, the grinder will be operated to have the motor 16 energized fora preselected period of time where the switch 18 is set to have the moving contact 53 engage selectively contacts 29, 31 or 33 and will operate under the manual control of the user where the switch 18 is set 'to have the moving contact 35 engage contact 28.

The delivery of the flushing water to. the disposer will be continued automatically after the motor is deenergized to provide a final flush of the grinderl Where the control circuitry 140 is used in lieu of control circuitry'6 0, the motor 116 comprises a reversing motor wherein-current to the motors start winding is electronically terminated after the motor comes up to speed and an automatic unjamming operation is effected in theevent that the grinder becomes jammed during the operation thereof otherwise the control 17 functions similarly with either control circuitry 60 or control circuitry 140.

Turning now to FIG. 5, a modified from of disposer, generally designated .210, is shown to comprise a grinding .chamber 211 containing a grinding device (not shown) driven by a suitable motor 216 and having an inlet'212 opening through a sink 213.. A control.214 is provided in the discharge line 215 for controlling the operation of the disposer 210 as av function .of a condition of operation thereof. lllustratively the condition may comprise thenoiselevel of the grinder operation, the opacity-of the effluent being discharged through the discharge-line 215, or the amount of vibration of the disposer. Referring more specifically to FIG. 6, power is delivered to control 214 from a first power supply lead L and a second power supply lead L A silicon controlled rectifier 218 .is energized upon the closing of switch 217 through the water valve solenoid 219, resistors 220,221, a capacitor 222, a breakover diode 223, and a diode 224 connected to the control element of the control rectifier 218. An antichatter diode 219a may be connected across the water valve solenoid 219.

Thus, the water valve 225 is opened to provide flushing water 7 from the supply 226 into the grinding chamber 211.

On positive half-cyclescurrent flows from terminal L, through a resistor 227, a diode 228, a resistor 229 and a resistor 230 to a capacitor 258. After a period of approximately 2 seconds, capacitor 258 charges to the zener voltage of a zener diode 232. Current now flows through a capacitor 231 and diode 232 to the gate electrode of a silicon controlled rectifier 234. The controlled rectifier 234 is connected between diode 228 and a diode 272 to a terminal 235 of a circuit, generally designated 236'. As shown in FIG. 8', terminal 235 is connected to a triac 260 which is connected between a terminal 237 and motor 216 which in turn is connected to a terminal 238 connected to switch217. The connection of the controlled rectifier 234 between lines L and L rendered conductive as above described, begins to provide firing current to the triac 260 during positive line cycles 2 seconds after water valve 225 opens. On negative half-line cycles of alternating current, power is delivered to the gate electrode of controlled rectifier 234 from terminal L through a resistor 227a, a'diode 239, resistor 230, capacitor 231 and diode 232. The triac 260 is fired by current flowing from terminal 237 to terminal 235 from power supply lead 1 through terminal 237 and thence through a diode 239, controlled rectifier 234 and a diode 240 and resistor 227 to switch 217.

'Controlled rectifier 218 may become nonconductive after approximately 2 seconds due to the charging of capacitor 222 to block the current flow to its gate. However, conduction of controlledrectifier 218 is maintained by a photocell 241 connected in parallel with capacitor 222 and illuminated by a neon lamp 242 (FIG. 8) connected in series with a resistor 243 across motor 216. Thus once motor 216 is energized neon lamp 242 is correspondingly energized to illuminate photocell 241 and maintain controlled rectifier 218 conducting by shunting sufficient current around capacitor 222 to the gate of controlled rectifier 218 maintain it conductive.

Controlled rectifier 234 will become nonconductive after approximately 5 seconds from the time current begins flowing through diode 232 (this represents 7 seconds after controlled rectifier 218 was first rendered conductive) to its gate due to the charging-of capacitor 231 to block current flow to its gate.

As indicated briefly above, the invention comprehends the control of the operation of the'grinder by means of the noise produced by the grinding operation. For this purpose, control 214 is provided with a conventional speaker 244 (FIG. 7) which is placed in sound-receiving relationship to the grinding chamber 211 and having its coil connected to a suitable transformer 245. A capacitor 246 is shunted across the transformer 245 and one lead of the transformer is connected to a terminal 247 and theother lead of the transformer is connected to a terminal 248 through a diode 249. A silicon control rectifier 250 is connected in parallel with silicon control rectifier 234 and has its gate connected to terminal 247. A capacitor 251 is connected between terminals 247 and 248. Thus speaker 244 will transmit gating pulses to control rectifier 250 as long as sufficient sound is received by the speaker as. a result of the audible grinding action in the grinding chamber 211. Thus rectifier 250 is maintained in conduction and effectively shunts control rectifier 234 which, as indicated above, goes out of conduction when the capacitor 231 is sufficiently charged. Thus current. is delivered through controlled rectifier 250 to terminal 235 at this time maintaining the energization of the motor 216.

. to a preselected low level, insufficient voltage is applied to the gate of controlled rectifier 250 to maintain it in conduction. Thus the gating pulses are no longer delivered to terminal 235 connected to the gate of tn'ac 260 thereby deenergizing the motor 216. At the same time, neon lamp 242 is deenergized thereby preventing further shunting of capacitor 222 by photocell 241 and permitting the capacitor to charge and thereby after a preselected period of time to discontinue conduction of controlled rectifier 218. The preselected time delay before the discontinuation of conduction of the rectifier 218 permits sufficient water to flow through the grinder 211 by the maintained energization of solenoid 219 to completely flush the grinder and the discharge line'215. As in control 17, a neon light 253 is connected in series with a suitable resistor 254 between resistor 220 and power supply lead L to indicate the operation of the grinder. As shown in FIG. 6, a capacitor 255 is connected between resistor 221 and power supply lead L to prevent sporadic turn on of controlled rectifier 218. A second neon lamp 256 is connected in series with a resistor 257 from resistor 229 to terminal 248 to regulate voltage to the gating circuit for controlled rectifier 234.

If it is desired to provide in the control 214 the unjamming circuitry selectively utilized in control 17, the circuitry As shown in FIG. 9, a modified control circuitry 261 may be employed in connection with control 214 to sense the termination of the disposing operation as a function of the presence of food waste material in the efiluent flowing through discharge line 215. To sense the presence of food waste in the effluent flowing through line 215, a neon lamp 262 is positioned on one side of a transparent window (not shown) in line 215. Diametrica1ly across from lamp 262, a photocell 266 is positioned adjacent a second window (not shown) in line 215. With food waste passing through line 215, light from lamp 262 will be blocked from photocell 266. However, when grinding is complete and only clear water flows in line 215, light from lamp262 will strike photocell 266. Lamp 262 is connected in series with a resistor 263. The series connection of the lamp and resistor may be effected between a terminal 264 connected to switch 217 and a terminal 265 connected to power supply lead L Photocell 266 is connected in series with a resistor 267. The resistor may be connected between a terminal 268 connected between rectifiers 228 and i v '23 9 a'nd the terminal 247 of FIG. 6. The photocell 266 may be connected between terminals 247 and 248. Thus, the photocell 266 maintains a relatively high voltage when the food waste material blocks sufficient light from lamp 262 to indicate the continuing grinding of the food waste material in the grinding chamber 211. This high resistance permits the gating current to be delivered through resistor 267 to the gate of control rectifier 250 (FIG. 6). When, however, the effluent becomes relatively clear so that a relatively large amount of light from lamp 262 impinges on photocell 266, the photocell becomes relatively conducting shunting the gating signals from resistor 267 to power supply lead L thereby terminating the operation of the disposer in the manner as aforedescribed.

Referring now to FIG. 10, a further modified control circuitry 270 for use in sensing the termination of operation of the disposer for use in control 214 is shown to comprise a vibration sensitive switch 271 which may be connected between terminals 268 and 247 in lieu of the control circuitry shown in FIG. 7. The switch 271 is a conventional switch which closes upon the sensing of a vibration such as is effected by the presence of the food waste material in the grinding chamber 211. The grinding of the food waste material produces sufficient vibration to maintain the switch 271 closed during the grinding operation and thereby maintains gating current to the silicon control rectifier 250. However, upon completion of the grinding operation, the switch 271 opens as a result of the drop in the vibration and the gate power to control rectifier 250 is removed thereby terminating the grinding operation as aforedescribed.

Thus, control 214 differs from control 17 in providing an automatic termination of the grinding operation in response to a sensed condition of operation thereof whereas control 17 provides an automatic termination of the grinding operation as a function of time which may be preselected by the user. In

the illustrated embodiments, a number of different transducers are shown for determining different conditions of operation of the disposer. As will be obvious to those skilled in the art, other suitable transducers may be employed for providing a suitable signal to indicate the termination of the grinding operation and thereby provide the desired control of the termination of the disposer operation.

While we have shown and described certain embodiments of our invention, it is to be understood that it is capable of many modifications. Changes, therefore, in the construction and arrangement may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

' lclaim:

1. In a food waste disposer having electrically operable means for grinding food waste in a flushing liquid and means for conducting the resultant food waste-containing effluent to a discharge zone, means for controlling the operation of the disposer comprising means responsive to a condition of the grrnding operation for terminating the operation of the rsposer, said electrically operable means including a dnve motor having an auxiliary start winding and a main run winding and said controlling means including means disconnecting the start winding when the motor reaches a preselected operating speed, said motor being reversely operable and said controlling means further including means for automatically reversing the motor in the event the grinding means becomes jammed, said start winding being energized upon each reversing operation, and means for deenergizing the motor as an incident of a continuous seriatim reversing of the motor resulting from a high temperature condition of the motor as a result of repeated energizations of the start winding due to failure of the reversing to unjarn the grinding means.

2. The food waste disposer of claim 1 wherein said controlling means comprises means for sensing the presence of ground waste in the effluent being conducted from the grinding means. 3. The food waste disposer of claim 1 wherein said controlling means comprises means for sensing the noise level of said grinding means for terminating the grinding operation upon a drop in the noise level thereof to a preselected low level indicating completion of the grinding of the food waste.

4. The food waste disposer of claim 1 wherein said controlling means comprises means for sensing vibration of the grinding means for terminating the grinding operation upon a drop in the vibration thereof to a preselected low level indicating completion of the grinding of the food waste.

5. The food waste disposer of claim 1 wherein said controlling means comprises means for sensing the presence of ground waste in the effluent being conducted from the grinding means including photocell means confronting said conducting means and means for passing light through the effluent to said photocell means.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3797762 *Jul 24, 1972Mar 19, 1974Eng ProdSewage comminutor
US3980241 *May 27, 1975Sep 14, 1976Prab Conveyors, Inc.Crusher and control circuit therefor
US4026480 *Jun 24, 1976May 31, 1977Hobart CorporationJam breaking method for comminuting device
US4373676 *Nov 24, 1980Feb 15, 1983Salvajor CompanyWaste food disposal system
US5308000 *Apr 8, 1993May 3, 1994Emerson Electric Co., Inc.Water saver control for disposers
US7066415 *Jun 10, 2003Jun 27, 2006Emerson Electric Co.Touch pad control information system for a food waste disposer
US7360729 *Apr 26, 2005Apr 22, 2008Emerson Electric Co.Food waste disposer shredder assembly
US7448563Apr 27, 2005Nov 11, 2008Emerson Electric Co.De-jamming device and method
US7815134Oct 14, 2005Oct 19, 2010The Salvajor CompanySystem and method for controlling water flow in a food waste handling system
US8579217Dec 3, 2010Nov 12, 2013Emerson Electric Co.Flushing water control for a food waste disposer based on visual detection of food waste
CN1968755BApr 27, 2005Jun 16, 2010艾默生电气公司De-jamming device of food waste disposer and method
EP1347836A1 *Nov 28, 2001Oct 1, 2003Emerson Electric CompanyFood waste disposer having variable speed motor and methods of operating same
WO2005105313A1 *Apr 27, 2005Nov 10, 2005Emerson Electric CoDe-jamming device of food waste disposer and method
WO2011071779A1 *Dec 3, 2010Jun 16, 2011Emerson Electric Co.Flushing water control for a food waste disposer based on visual detection of food waste
Classifications
U.S. Classification241/33, 241/36, 241/46.13
International ClassificationB02C25/00
Cooperative ClassificationB02C25/00, B02C2018/164
European ClassificationB02C25/00