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Publication numberUS3545762 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 8, 1970
Filing dateJan 8, 1968
Priority dateJan 8, 1968
Publication numberUS 3545762 A, US 3545762A, US-A-3545762, US3545762 A, US3545762A
InventorsRobert H Atkinson
Original AssigneeRobert H Atkinson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Political campaign game apparatus
US 3545762 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Primary Examiner-Delbert B. Lowe Attorney-Addams & Ferguson [72] Inventor Robert H. Atkinson ABSTRACT: A political campaign game apparatus compris- Washington, District ofColumbio (3220 ing a board having a main course marked thereon. The main Dunster Court, Cambridge Station Fairfax course includes a plurality of spaces where some of the spaces VA 22030) correspond to voting units, such as one or more states of the [2 1] Appl. No. 696,227 United States of America. Further. the voting units are divided [22] Filed Jan. 8, 1968 into groups or coalitions. A spinner is used to determine the [45] Patented Dec. 8, 1970 number of spaces a player moves. When a players piece moves to one of the voting units, he consults a vote calculator which indicates the percentage of the total unit vote which is POLITICAL CAMPAIGN GAME APPARATUS won or lost in that voting unit as a result of a position that l3 chlmia9blawilll 8 player took on a particular issue. Each voting unit space, in 52 us. CI. 213/134 addition 10 containing indicia corresponding to the total unit [51] hm CL H A633"); vote, also contains indicia identifying the unit, which typically 501 Field ofSearch 273/134 is a We of United States; a number indicating the numerical order of the position of the unit with respect to other units on the main course; and a number indicating 10 percent of the 56] References Cited electorate of the unit. v

UNITED STATES PATENTS The main course of the game board also includes other spaces such as Decision and Running Mate spaces which 678,824 7/i90l Carney 273/130 p i y correspond to Decision and i g M cards 8222:: et piled, face-downward, in the central portion of the game 330, 3/1960 Gross et a 273/134 board. Upon landing upon such a space, a player must select one of these cards and follow the instructions thereon. A Party Preference Survey space is also provided to allow a player landing thereon to select a particular coalition favoring him.

'IEHOIATIG GAMPAION NIAUQUAIrlI- UNIONIM RUNNING mm:

no. W S I D Mil. OOALIYDON PATENTED DEC 8 I976 SHEET 2 OF 3 IINVENTUR firm 60w ATTORNEYS POLITICAL CAMPAIGN GAME APPARATUS BACKGROUNDOF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a novel political campaign game. The game is designed to simulate the conditions which affect a political campaign. The game basically involves the winning and losing of votes as the campaign progresses in various voting units (one or more states, for example). In order to do this, the candidate-player must take a position on several issues and thereby arrive at his platform. And, based on this platform, a players fortunes rise and fall as he encounters various voting units which must be for, against, or undecided about the platform upon which he is running. The players can take a conservative, progressive, or indecisive position on each of the issues involved in the campaign in accordance with their own political leanings or in accordance with a strategy which they feel affords them the greatest chance of winning the election.

Prior art relating to this invention is as follows: U.S. Pat. Nos. 1,714,546; 2,209,117; 3,058,747; 2,930,621; and

SUMMARY It is therefore a primary object of this invention to provide a game which accurately simulates and recreates a political campaign.

Another object is to provide a game which simulates the election of the President of the United States either by the electoral vote method or by the popular vote method.

A further object is to provide a political campaign game which permits the players to take positions on the issues and thereby form a platform upon which the players hopes rise and fall.

A further object is to provide a political campaign game in which the players are provided with a game board having a main course divided into a plurality of areas, which respectively represent voting units such as one or more states of the United States of America. 1

A further object is to provide a political game ofthe above type wherein some of the spaces of the main course are associated with cards having game-affecting instructions thereon and wherein some of said cards permit the player to decide which of two alternative choices he will take with respect to the conductof his campaign.

For further comprehension of the invention, reference should be made to the following detailed description, drawings, and claims, in which the various novel features are more particularly set forth.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a plan view of a playing board for a board game apparatus constructed in accordance with an illustrative embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a plan view of one side of an illustrative embodiment of a vote calculator employed in playing the game, a portion of the circular dial being broken away to show parts of the annular chart underneath the dial.

FIG. 3 is a side view of one of the playing pieces employed in the game.

FIG. 4 is a plan view of a spinner employed in the game.

FIG. 5 is a plan view of a token employed in the game.

FIG. 6 represents certain ones of Electoral" cards used in the game.

FIG. 7 represents certain ones'of Ballot. cards used in the alternative method of playing the game.

FIG. 8 represents certain ones of a set of cards identified as Decision" cards which are included in the game.

FIG. 9 represents certain ones of a set of cards identified as Running Mate" cards which are included in the game.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION Referring now to the drawings, and to FIG. 1 in particular, the game apparatus of the invention includes a playing surface which is preferably in the form .of a board designated generally by the numeral 10in FIG. 1. In the preferred embodiment, the board 10 is substantially square-shaped as shown and contains an upper surface 12 on which is provided, by printing or the like, suitable indicia and graphic illustrations in accordance with the invention, as will be explained hereinafter.

In order to provide a playing field for the players, a playing path or main course, designated generally by the numeral 14,

is provided. The main course 14 is divided into a series of spaces or areas, some of which are numbered, for the purpose of this description, 1 through '36, and others of which are numbered 40-58 as shown, Some of the last mentioned numbers being applied to groups of spaces representing coalitions. The numerals 1-36 are imprinted as indicia on the playing surface and respectively correspond to 36 voting units, most of which are single states (such as space 36 which corresponds to New York) and some of which are two or more states (such as space 9 which corresponds to North and South Dakota). Note that it is possible to provide 51 voting units corresponding to the 50 states and the District of Columbia; however, the choice of 36 voting units is preferred. Further although the more or less random arrangement of the voting units along the main A course as shown in FIG. 1 is-preferred, one possible different arrangement would be to space the voting units from the Election Central space 40 in accordance with each units rank in the voting age population or size of the electorate.

Within each space 1-36 is also included the number of electoral votes (preferably based on the most current decennial census) corresponding to the voting unit represented by that space. This number is employed in the preferred method of playing the game and is printed preferably in the left-central portion of the space, and thus New York is indicated as having 43 electoral votes while the North and South Dakota voting unit is indicated as having eight electoral votes. Also included in each of the spaces 1-36 at the right-central portion thereof is an alphanumeric representation indicating 10 percent of the electorate of the voting unit corresponding to the space. This representation is used with an alternate method of playing the game and, accordingly, 10 percent of the electorate of New York is indicated as 1,000,000 yoters while 10 percent of the electorate of the North and South Dakota voting unit 'is indicated as 75,000 voters. a

As is shown in FIG. 1, the voting units are divided into si coalitions and, thus, the North and South Dakota voting unit is grouped into the Great Lakes coalition 39 with Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Indiana. The remaining coalitions are: 1 the Yankee coalition 37, 2 the Dixiecrat coalition 41, 3 the Rural Heartlands coalition 43, 4 the Pacific Northwest coalition 45, and 5 the Big City coalition 47. The purpose of these coalitions will be explained in more detail hereinafter.

The main course 14 also includes a variety of additional spaces 40-58 which lends further interest to the game and which intensifies the competitive play between the participants. These additional spaces are preferably less in number than the voting unit spaces 1-36. In the specific embodiment illustrated in FIG. 1, the additional spaces include 1 the corner spaces: Election Central" space 40, Republican Campaign Headquarters space 44, Party Preference Survey" space 50, and Democratic Campaign Headquarters space 54; and 2 spaces positioned along the four legs of the main course: Decision spaces 42, 48 and 56, and Running Mate spaces 46, 52 and 58. The purposes of these additional spaces will be described in more detail hereinafter. The main course is continuous, with the Election Central space 40 constituting the starting point, so that the players may move through the course 14 continuously during the play until the termination of the game. The board surface 12 also contains marked off indicate for convenience that portion of the surface on which sets of cards identified as Decision and Running Mate cards 90 and 92 (see FIGS. 8 and 9), respectively, are piled, face downward, as will be described in more detail hereinafter. Also printed on the playing surface 12 is a Political Platforms chart 63 which includes the issues on which each of the players takes a position, the issues being numbered 1-12 as shown. The particular issues (such as the United Nations, Farm Subsidies, etc.) are preferably printed on the playing surface. In other embodiments of the game apparatus, it may be desirable not to print the issues on the playing surface but rather on a separate sheet of paper. It can be seen that this modification facilitates keeping the issues current since the game owner would only have to purchase a new set of issues together with a vote calculator (described hereinafter) each time a change of issues was required. However, as can be appreciated, the issues shown in FIG. 1 are ones of general continuing interest. And, thus, it is not contemplated that a change of the FIG. 1 set of issues would be required for a long period of time. Further, in this regard, however, it may be desirable to use a set of issues which are rather specific thereby probably necessitating fairly regular changes in the issues. For example, the issues may be restricted on a geographical basis, for example, to those of interest in a particular state or geographical region, such as the Far West. However, when the set of platforms is so restricted, it can be appreciated that the designations on the voting unit spaces l-36 would have to be changed to correspond to the smaller geographical region.

The game according to the invention also includes a vote calculator shown in FIG. 2. The calculator preferably includes a circular disk 64 on both sides of which is printed a circular array of numerals 136 at the periphery thereof. Only one side of the calculator is shown for purposes of clarity; however, a description of one side will be sufficient inasmuch as the two sides are substantially the same. The numerals l-36 respectively correspond to the voting unit spaces 1-36 along the main course I4 of the playing surface 12. An annular chart 66 containing numeric indicia 68 is printed on both sides of the disk 64 within the circle of numerals l-36. Thus on both sides of the disk are printed substantially similar indicia, the only difference being the particular indicia printed within the circle of numerals 1-36. For each of the voting units 1-36, there are l2 issues l-IZ on which the players take a position in that voting unit as will be described in more detail hereinafter. These issues have been generally discussed hereinbefore and respectively correspond to the issues listed in chart 63 of FIG. 1.

In FIG. 2, there is shown a circular dial 70 including a notched sector 72, the dial 70 being rotatably held by appropriate means such as an eyelet 74 to the disk 64. On the opposite side of disk 64 is also rotatably held another notched dial (not shown) by the eyelet 74. Printed adjacent the notched sector 72 along a radial line are the numerals 1-6 which respectively correspond to the issues 16 listed in chart 63 of FIG. I. The numerals 7-12 (not shown) are rinted adjacent the notched sector of the dial attached to the opposite side of disk 64. The indicia 68 of the annular chart 66 are disposed in 36 radial columns which respectively correspond to the voting units l-36. The column corresponding to voting unit 9 is shown in FIG. 2, it being exposed by the notched sector 72. Portions of the radial columns corresponding to voting units 2731 are also exposed in FIG. 2. For each of the issue numerals I6 disposed along the notched sector 72, three concentric rings are provided and within each of these three rings for a given radial column (voting unit) there is printed a number, which may have a plus, minus or zero value. Thus, the complete annular chart 66, as seen in FIG. 2, comprises 36 radial columns and l8 concentric circles. Briefly, the numeric indicia 68 represent the percentage of the popular vote of a particular voting unit which a player either gains or loses for having taken a particular position on a given issue in that unit. In other words, the numeric indicia 68 represent the percentage change of the vote of a particular voting unit controlled by a player because of the position he has taken on a particular issue within that unit. Three of the percentage change indicia 68 are disposed adjacent each of the platform numerals 1-6 for each voting unit. Thus, for voting unit 9 (North and South Dakota), the percentage change indicia 20, 0 and 20 are listed adjacent the Civil Rights Issue 4, shown in FIG. 2. The upper percentage change indicia 20 indicates that a player will lose 20 percent of the vote of voting unit 9 if he has previously announced his position as being for Civil Rights. If undecided, his control of the votes remains unchanged, and if against, he gains 20 percent of the vote. It should be noted that a player can gain or lose votes even though undecided on a particular issue. Thus, if a player were undecided about Farm-Subsidies in unit 9, he would still gain 10 percent of the vote for that voting unit. Whenever the percentage change indicia 68 indicate a loss of vote control, they may be colored red while for a gain or no change in vote control, they are colored black. The particular percentage change indicia 68 have been chosen to reflect the actual, long-range feelings about the various platforms within the respective voting units.

Each of the players (preferably two through six in number) represents the presidential candidate of a political party. Six typical parties would be Liberal Democrat, Independent Democrat, Conservative Democrat, Liberal Republican, Independent Republican, and Conservative Republican. Each of the players is represented by a piece or token for registering movement through the course 14, one of which is shown in FIG. 3 and is designated by the numeral 80. The pieces are of different colors so that each players movement through the course 14 may be readily identified without confusion.

Any suitable means involving the element of chance may be included in the game for indicating the extent of a players movement through the course 14 as each player takes his turn. Preferably a spinner 82, as shown in FIG. 4, having a rotatable pointer and twelve sectors marked 1 through I2, is employed thereby equalizing the probability that any of the numbers 1- -12 will result after the spinner is hit. The resulting number determines l the number of spaces in the main course 14 through which the player's piece is to be moved and 2 other important matters which will be discussed hereinafter.

Each player attempts to gain control of the vote of as many voting units as possible in the preferred method of playing the game. To indicate the extent of each players control of the various voting units, tokens are provided, one of which is shown in FIG. 5 and designated by the numeral 84. Each player is provided with a plurality of these tokens (preferably 100), the color of the tokens corresponding to the color of the piece selected by the player. The playing surface 12 of the board preferably has printed thereon lines which extend beyond the lines defining the voting units 136 as shown at 86 and 88, for example. Preferably, each player places between the lines 86 and 88 the number of tokens corresponding to the extent of his control over the voting unit 9 (North and South Dakota). Each of the tokens, in this embodiment of the invention, represents 10 percent of the vote and, thus, if player A has 40 percent of the vote of unit 9, four tokens of his color will be placed between lines 86 and 88 while if player B has 10 percent of the vote of unit 9, only one token of his color will be placed between the lines. Although it is preferred that each token represent 10 percent of the vote, any round FIG. from I to percent can be used. This could necessitate several denominations" of voting tokens.

In the preferred embodiment, the number of tokens cannot exceed 10 or 100 percent of the available vote from a voting unit. when 100 percent of the vote is controlled for a particular voting unit, no further change or shift of the vote for or against any of the players is permitted for this unit and the space corresponding to this unit becomes a free space upon which all players can land with impunity. The manners by which the players gain or lose control over the votes of the voting units are several. The most important way is via the vote calculator, discussed hereinbefore. However, practically every feature. of the game apparatus has as its purpose, either directly or indirectly, to affect the extent of vote control each of the players has over the respective voting units and thereby effectively simulate a political campaign.

The player controlling the greatest number of votes for a particular voting unit is given an Electoral Vote card 94, in the preferred. method of playing the game (Electoral Vote), as shown in FIG. 6. As the play of the game progresses, the Vote card 94 may change hands many times as different players assume control of the votes for a particular unit. However, as long as a player holds an Electoral Vote card, he is entitled to all of the electoral votes of the voting unit corresponding to that card. Further, if and when 100 percent of the vote for a particular unit is controlled, the player having a majority, if any, at that time is conceded that voting unit by the other players and he retains possession of the card 94 corresponding to that unit for the remainder of the game. If two or more players control an equal number of the votes of the unit, the tie is broken at the end of the game in an appropriate manner, preferably governed by an element of chance, as will be described in more detail hereinafter.

In the alternate method of playing the game (Popular Vote), each player is given one or more of the Ballots96 shown in FIG. 7 for each 1.0 percent of the vote of a particular voting unit that he controls. Preferably, there are six denominations of Ballots: 25,000; 50,000; 100,000; 500,000;

1,000,000 and 5,000,000 votes. Since the number of votes a player controls in a particular voting unit contributes to his grand total at the end of the game, even if he doesnot control the majority of votes for that unit, there is no exchange of Ballot cards 96 between the players as is the case with the Electoral Vote cards 94 in the preferred method of playingthe game. Rather, an exchange occurs with the representative of the Electoral College (a player so appointed prior to play of the game) who gives toand receives from the players the Ballot cards as they gain and lose control of the votes of the various voting units. This representative also is employed in the preferred. method of playing the game as a caretaker of the tion has been chosen by or assigned to a player,the tokens preferably being placed off the playing surface 12 and adjacent the assigned coalition.

When a players' piece 80 lands, on one of the Decision spaces 42, 48 or 56, or one of the Running Mate spaces 46,52

or 58, the player is required to select the top card from a piled set of Decision cards 90 (preferably green), which are shown in detail in FIG. 8, or the top .card from a piled set of Running Mate cards 92 (preferably'y'ellow), which are shown in detail in FIG. 9. The cards 90 and 92 are appropriately stacked in the regions 60 and 62, respectively, on the board surface 12 and impose upon the player a decision which must be-made, dictate a movement on" the main course, or affect the players control of the vote in one or more of the voting units. Typical inscriptions on theDecision and Running Mate cards are tive is chosen, the player must payanypenalties that may result from advancing to that unit before following the additional instructions relating to the advancementQWhile any number of cards 90 and 92 may be provided, in the preferred embodiment of the invention twenty of the Decision cards and twenty of the Running Mate cards are employed and any suitable play-affecting information such as shownon the drawings may be inscribed on the cards.

' Further important features of the game are derived from the corner areas 40, 44, and 54. Besides serving as a starting point for play of the game, the Election Central space 40 serves as a point which when passed by a player permits that player to increase his control of the voting unit of his choice by 10 percent. If a player stops on space 40 and then moves away therefrom on his next turn, this counts only as one passing of the Election Central space.

Whenever one of the Republican and Democratic Campaign Headquarters spaces 44 and 54 is landed upon by a player, he is permitted to increase by 10 percent his control over the vote in the voting unit of his choice if the party he represents corresponds to the Campaign Headquarters upon which he landed; if not, he either I must select for each of the players representing the party different from his (for this pur-' pose of these Campaign Headquarters spaces all shades of Democrats are considered to be of the same party and different from all shades of Republicans which are also considered to be of the same party) the voting unitsof his respective choices in which he will lose 10 percent of the vote and they will gain 10 percent of the vote or 2 lose three turns.lf he decides to surrender votes in the voting units of his choice to the candidates of the opposite party, he has the power to designate which of these candidates gain votes in which voting units.

Whenever the Party Preference Survey space 50 is landed upon by a player, that player is. permitted to select one of the coalitions 37-47 depending on his particular preference. This results in a reassignment of the coalitions to the respective players, the players successively to the left of the player who landed on space50 being assigned the coalitions successively to the left of the selected coalition. The initial selection and assignment of the coalitions will be described hereinafter.

When play is to be engaged in utilizing a novel game constructed in accordance with the invention, preferably two to six players may participate, each one choosing a playing piece 80 of FIG. 3. As'previously discussed, the pieces are readily distinguishable from the standpoint of color where the pieces respectively represent the*followingpolitical parties: Liberal Democrat, Independent Democrat, Conservative Democrat, Liberal Republican, Independent Republican, and Conservative Republican.

One of the players acts as representative of the Electoral College and this player handles the Electoral Vote cards 94 or the Ballots 96 prior to the beginning of and during the game. This player also participates in the game in the manner of the other players.

In the preferred method of playing the game, a player may win the game in either of two ways, that is, I byobtaining the largest number of the electoral votes within a predetermined periodof time 60 minutes for two or three players and minutes for four, five or six players), or 2 by being the first one to obtain a predetermined number of the electoral votes (225 votes for two or three players and I75 votes for four, five, or six players). Thus, in this preferred method of playing the game, there is a continuing struggle among the players to obtain a plurality (no matter how slight) of the votes of a suffi cient number of the voting units to insure victory at the end of the game or campaign.

The next step is to determine which of the players goes first.

The spinner 82 is hit by each of them and the one getting the highest number takes the first turn. The remaining players take their turns in accordance with their position successively tothe left of the first player. An advantage accorded to the player going first is the selection of the coalition of his choice. This advantage exists because, in the event of a tie at the end of the game between two or more players astothe control of a particular voting pnit, the tie may be broken it any of the players is favored by the coalition within which that voting unit lies. Otherwise, the tie is broken by having each of the players hit the spinner, the one with the highest number winning. The remaining players have no choice in the selection of the remaining coalitions, the order of the assignment being determined by the successive positions of the remaining players to the left of the player who obtained the highest number on the spinner. As explained hereinbefore, the coalition assignments can change whenever one of the players lands upon the Party Preference Survey space 50. In addition to selecting the coalition of his choice, the player with the highest number also chooses the party of his choice and the remaining players proceed with their party selections, in order, to the left of this player. Each player indicates his party preference on a separate sheet of paper (not shown). The selection of a party is final and the player is considered that party's presidential candidate.

Next each player takes a position on each of the issues by writing on the above-mentioned sheet of paper whether he is for, against or undecided about each of the 12 issues. Thus, for example, player A's position 'may be that he is for the Civil Rights issue 4 while Player B may decide that he is against this particular issue. As stated hereinbefore, it may be possible to gain votes by being undecided on a particular issue but usually the greatest number of votes is gained or lost, respectively, by being for or against a particular platform. At no time can a player change his stand on any of the twelve issues during the preferred method of playing the game. However, the game could also be played in such a way that the players would be permitted to change their platforms at various stages of the game. Thus, a Decision card might permit a change on a particular issue.

After the above preliminaries have been completed, all of the pieces are placed on Election Central space 40 and the player who spun the highest number commences the campaign. He hits the spinner and advances the number of spaces indicated. If he lands on a voting unit space, the number he spun also indicates the issue on which he will campaign in that voting unit although another hit on the spinner may be employed to determine the issue to be campaigned upon. The calculator is then employed to determine the percentage of votes won or lost in the voting unit landed upon. For example, if a player was on voting unit space 5 (Maryland, Delaware, District of Columbia) and spun five, he would advance to voting unit 9 (North and South Dakota) where he would campaign on issue number 5 (that is, Farm Subsidies). Using the calculator, the circular dial 70 is rotated until the notched sector '72 is aligned with the numeral 9 at the periphery of the disk 64, as shown in FIG. 2. If the player were for Farm Subsidies, the calculator indicates that the voters of North and South Dakota would reward him with 30 percent of that unit's votes. If undecided, he gains 10 percent and if against, he loses percent. If prior to landing on voting unit 9 the player controlled less than 20 percent of the vote of that unit, he would lose only that amount which will reduce his percentage of vote control to zero, that is, negative vote control percentages are not provided for. For each 10 percent of the vote won or lost, respectively, the player either places or removes one of his tokens 84 (see FIG. 5) on or from the space provided above the voting unit. If he has gained majority control (that is, he has more tokens than any other player for that voting unit), he is given the Electoral Vote card 94 by the representative of the Electoral College or the player from whom he wrested control.

When a player accumulates 60 percent or more of the votes of a voting unit, he earns a special bonus to aid him in the conduct of his political campaign. Thus, if player A lands on the voting unit wherein at least 60 percent of the vote iscontrolled by player B, player A must, before taking his turn at the calculator, surrender 10 percent of the votes he already possesses on that unit to player B. Further, player B is permitted to increase his control of the voting unit by 10 percent. Thus,

player A removes one of his tokens 84 from the unit while player B adds another token to that unit to further increase his control over that unit.

As stated hereinbefore', when the total percentage of controlled vote equals percent, for a given voting unit, the polls for that unit are considered closed. If a Running Mate or Decision card relating to that unit is drawn, it is ignored and another card is drawn. Any player, regardless of whether he controls votes within that unit or not, who lands on that unit takes no action. Thus, the unit becomes, in effect, a free resting space. Any player landing on such a space would, of course, not take a turn at the vote calculator.

If the beforementioned player A (who has landed on a voting unit wherein at least 60 percent of the votes are controlled by player B) does not control 10 percent of the votes of that unit, he must surrender 10 percent of his votes from any other unit in which he controls votes, the selection of the unit where player A will lose votes being made by player B. However. in this situation, player B does'not substitute one of his tokens for the one surrendered by player A. Once whatever required penalty has been levied against player A, he then takes his turn at the calculator in an effort to wrest control of the voting unit from player B.

If player B controls at least 60 percent of the votes in several or all of the units within one of the coalitions 37-47, further tactical advantages are given to him. Thus, if player A lands on one of such units, he must surrender 10 percent of the votes controlled by him in each of the voting units of the coalition wherein player B controls at least 60 percent of the vote. If player A does not control 10 percent of the vote in one or more of those units controlled by player B in the coalition, the procedure is the same as that stated above where player B controls only one voting unit within a coalition. However, if player B is given more than one opportunity to penalize player A, he can only demand that player A surrender 10 percent per voting unit. Hence, if player B is given three opportunities, they must be 10 percent of three different voting units and not 30 percent of one unit. Further, player 8 cannot demand that player surrender 10 percent of the vote in any unit in which the polls have closed.

To illustrate the above assume player B controls at least 60 percent of the votes in New York, New Jersey and Ohio, all in the Big City coalition 47. Player A controls 10 percent of the vote in New York and none in New Jersey and Ohio. If player A lands on New Jersey, the-following'occurs before player A can take his turn at the calculator of FIG. 2. In New York, player A removes his token 84 and player B adds another of his tokens. In New Jersey and Ohio, nothing occurs since player A has no control whatsoever over these states. Thus, player B requests that player A remove two tokens respectively from two other voting units of player Bs choice. However, player B cannot replace these latter'tokens with ones of his own. Further, player B cannot force player A to remove two tokens from one voting unit.

The effect of landing on the spaces 40 through 58 has already been described in detail hereinbefore. It can now be seen that the players have many opportunities to employ various aggressive, holding, or defensive strategies which are characteristic of the decisions made during an actual political campaign. Illustrative of a situation where various types of strategies could be employed is as follows:

Assume that:

l. there are no tokens 84 on Ohio, which has 26 electoral votes;

2. player-A has one token on New York which has 43 electoral votes while none of the other players has any tokens on this state;

3. player B, the game leader at the moment has two tokens on California which has 40 electoral votes while none of the other players has any tokens on this state;

4. player C has six tokens on Michigan which is worth 21 electoral votes while none of the other players has any tokens on this state; and

I 5. player D has five tokens on Pennsylvania which has 29 ,CICCOIQI votes. Assuming that player D has just passed Election Central and he now has the opportunity to gain state. This would, for themoment, give him Ohios Electoral card which is worth 26 electoral votes; 7 he could place his token on New York and tie for majorit'y control of that state-As a result, player A would have to return New Yorks Electoral Vote card to theElectoral l College. This would mean that player'D might have a f betterchance for eventuallygaining' majority controlof New York for himself, and regardless of this fact he has already caused the subtraction of 43 electoral votes from" player Afs total; l j I he could place his token on California. Since player Bis the current leader it might be wise to stay close on his heels in such a big state,- in order to possibly obtain majority control at a later time;

tor. Since player C contr'olsl) percent of the'vo'te in that state it might be wise to protect himself. For if helahdson Michigan'and hasnotoken' there, thenplayer C'may force him to give up 10 percent of 'hisvotes in a valuable state he cannotaiford to lose; and e he could place the token on"Pennsylvania. Since he" already has tokens thereihe would be giving himself-the advantages that accrue from controlling 60 percent or more of the votes in a state: 1 Having describedin detailIthe' preferred method of playing the game, an alternate method will now bedescribed wherein the player obtaining (l the most popular votes withina' predetermined period of time (60 minutes for two or three players and 90 minutes for'four, fiv e' or six players) or 2 20,000,000 popular votes (two or three players) or 14,000,000 popular votes (four, five or six players) wins-The 1 equipment employed is the same as in the preferred method except that the Ballot cards 96 oi- FIG. 7 are used ratherthan' the Electoral Vote cards of FIG. 6. The remaining difingthe game are'few andare'as follows: 4 I e I. A player'is desig fatejd as representative of-the'State Else non Board and he l1olds"the Ballots.'He performs'the same duties as the representative for the Electo'ral'College' in the preferred method only he is dealing with Ballots and notElectoral Vote cards; j

2. Players are not concerned in any way with'Electdral' Votes and as'a' result are concerned only with the number on the right in eachstate square;

3. Every time a player wins votes he rcceivesthat equivalent amount in Ballots from the State Election Board. If he loses votes he returns that 'equivalentiback to the State Election Board. Note that Ballots are never transferred from player to player as' are Electoral Vote cards in h the preferred method;

4.Therc' is no such thing'as breaking a tie on'a particular state. If both Players A and B have percent of the vote in New York, then each is entitled to 1,000,000 votes (in Ballots) in his possession; and

ferences between the preferred'and alternate methods of play 5. If one player has more votes than another'in astate, he 60' does n o't'gain all the votes for that state. Each player is en titled to the number-ofvotes he has won; w i Everything else remains the same,'includirlg the'method of setup, selection of party and political issues, use of the "calculator, coalition bonuses, rules concerning possession of 60 per cent ormore of a states votes, rules for corner squares, etc.-

After the game is over=ancl the winner has been determined there may remain some voting units which are unclaimed either in the electoral or popular vote method of playing the game. In order to add a final notcof authenticity to the game, 70

the votes of these unclaimed voting units may be added tothe vote total of the winning player thereby correspondingly increase his total. This increased total has no bearing on the game outcome. However, as'stated above, it does add a final note of authenticity to the game. t

. he could place'his token on Michigan as player safety fae- Manyrpossible modifications of the invention have been discussed hereinbefore. Still numerous other modifications will become apparent upon reading the foregoing disclosure. During such a reading, it will be evident that this invention has provided'a unique political'campaign game for accomplishing the advantages and objects herein stated.

I claim: 1. A political campaign game apparatus for a plurality of players'comprisingt e I a game board having a main course'thereon divided into a plurality of spaces and constituting a playing path for the players;

N of said spaces having marked thereon distinctive indicia to identify which one of N voting units is represented thereby; 1

a vote calculator including a matrixof M rows corresponding to M issues of a political campaign and N columns 'corre sponding to said N voting units, said calculator having marked thereon (l the same indicia as that marked on the game board spaces to identify saidN columns and thereby distinguish the voting units from one another and 2 numerical indicia to identify said M rows;

each cell defined by the intersection of one of said M rows with one of said N columns having marked thereon a plurality of change indicia, each of which is indicative of the percentage of change in the number of votes the voting unit corresponding to the cell will give or withdraw on the issue corresponding to the cell;

individually distinctive playing pieces respectively corresponding to the plurality of players for indicating the movement of the player s through said main course; and

means for selecting. by chance a number which is used to determine the extent ofmovement of said playing pieces through said course and for determining which of said M issues is to be campaigned upon.

2. A political campaign game apparatus as in claim 1 where at least one of said main course spaces has marked thereon indicia indicating the number of votes available from the voting unit named thereon. l

I 3. A political, game apparatus as in claim 1 where N equals .A political game apparatus as in claim 1 where M equals said N columns extend radially and said M rows are concentric.

rings, and said circular dial having a notched sector for expos5 ing one of said N radial'columns;

7. A political campaign game apparatus as in claim 1 includ ing: a set'of Decision cardsy'which have inscribed thereon at least two game-affecting instructions, said board having designated thereon a space in which said cards may be stacked.- 8.'A-po'litical campaign game apparatus as in claim 7 including a set of Running Mate cards, which have inscribed thereon game-affecting instructions relating to the hypothetical running mates of the respective political candidate represented by the playing pieces.

9. A political game apparatus as in claim 8 including aplurality of distinctive. sets of tokens respectively visually corresponding to said playing pieces for positioning on the playing board adjacent each of said main course spaces, said tokens being of a size suitable for said positioning.

10-. A political game apparatus as in claim 9 including a set of Electoral Vote cards respectively designating one of said N spaces representing voting units.

11. A political game apparatus as in claim 9 including a set of Ballot cards g respectively indicating a predetermined number of votes.

13. A political game apparatus as in claim I wherein said chance selection means comprises a spinner.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3756604 *Nov 22, 1971Sep 4, 1973A LaszloPolitical science board game construction
US3889955 *Jul 5, 1974Jun 17, 1975Dreama B HintonLegislative board game apparatus
US3977680 *Jan 15, 1976Aug 31, 1976Lavine Matt PBoard game apparatus involving criminal justice
US4046381 *Jul 26, 1976Sep 6, 1977Comeaux George EBoard game with selector die
US4299390 *Oct 15, 1979Nov 10, 1981Raul DelgadoElection board game with campaign promise markers
US4410181 *May 29, 1981Oct 18, 1983Mattel, Inc.Electronic board game
US4643429 *May 13, 1985Feb 17, 1987Crandon Peter DEducational board game
US4709926 *May 15, 1986Dec 1, 1987Diegidio Leo CElectoral college game
US8313102 *Jun 16, 2009Nov 20, 2012Yolanda Gail ThorntonCurrent affair, political game apparatus and method engaging role play
US20110136559 *Dec 9, 2009Jun 9, 2011Glyn Mason OttofyPolitical Persuasion Rating System, Politico: Liberal, Conservative, Evil Ranking
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/257
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00138, A63F3/00006
European ClassificationA63F3/00A22