Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3548160 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 15, 1970
Filing dateAug 25, 1965
Priority dateJun 23, 1965
Publication numberUS 3548160 A, US 3548160A, US-A-3548160, US3548160 A, US3548160A
InventorsWilliam Bradley Welsh
Original AssigneeWilliam Bradley Welsh
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for entering data
US 3548160 A
Abstract  available in
Images(14)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [54] APPARATUS FOR ENTERING DATA 56 Claims, 52 Drawing Figs.

52 05.01 ass/61.6; 197/20;235/61.11,235/145 s11 nn.c1. B4lj5/36; 606k 15/00, G06k 7/10 501 Field olSearch 64/84;

88/24; 178/17, 17.5; 192/84; 197/20; 235/61, 6l.l,6l.l1,6l.6,61.7,61.9, l45;250/219;

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,580,270 12/1951 Badgley et al. 88/24 2,594,358 4/1952 Shaw 88/24 2,658,940 11/1953 Wise et al. 178/17D 2,724,014 ll/l955 Edgar l78/17D 2,792,175 5/1957 Amundsen l78/17DX 2,953,300 9/1960 O'Brian et al... 235/1 6.12 3,023,952 3/1962 Thomas 235/6l.l 3,028,080 4/1962 Schwend 235/61.6 3,035,764 5/ 1962 Beman 235/61.9 3,040,978 6/ 1962 Eng1und.. 235/145X 3,045,905 7/1962 Tarasuk 235/61.12 3,085,746 4/ 1963 Pasinski et a1. 235/145 3,124,674 3/1964 Edwards et al. 235/61.l 3,138,702 6/1964 Heming et a1.... 235/61.6X 3,177,998 4/1965 Rossez 1 92/84 3,197,618 7/1965 Stanley et al. 235/61.6 3,205,989 9/1965 Mantey 192/84 3,234,358 2/1966 Dashew et a1.... 235/6l.l 3,302,877 2/1967 Stuiber et al..... 235/145 3,315,889 4/1967 Thevis 235/145 3,321,748 5/1967 Holland 235/61.11X 3,325,631 6/1967 Onuma et a1. 235/61.1l 3,327,098 6/1967 Riggin 2315/61. 3,353,441 1 H1967 Jonker 88/24 3,390,749 7/1968 Pospisil et al. 192/84 2,063,481 12/1936 Bryce 250/2191CR 2,826,987 3/1958 Eckhoff.... 101/19 2,950,048 8/1960 Luhn 235/6'1.7l 3,039,582 6/1962 Simjian 235/6l.7(B) 3,309,669 3/ 1967 Lemelson 340/ 146.3 3,346,853 10/1967 Koster 340/1463 3,355,576 11/1967 Childels 235/61.7(B) 3 ,394,246 7/1968 Goldman 235/61.7

Primary Examiner- Daryl W. Cook Assistant Examiner-Robert M. Kilgore Attorney- Kenyon & Kenyon, Reilly, Carr & Chapin ABSTRACT: Apparatus is disclosed for entering data into a data processing system comprising means for receiving a record containing fixed data in the form of a code representation thereon. Additionally means are provided for forming a code representation of the variable data in response to a SHEET 02 0F 14 BBBBBEEEB @EEBEEEEE m@ m @EEEEBEEE I 1 7 m m m@ m@@@@ IV @@@@@@@@E BBBBQBEEB m@@ @EMzMEEEEE g S\ PATENTED 0501 51970 INVENTOR. Mum/ BPADLE) l/a-sl/ 2&7 w

ATTOQ/YEYS EATENTEU DEC] 5 I976 SHEET 03 HF 14 INVENTOR.

Byway was w 9%,

Afig/VEYS PATENTEDUEBISIQYU 3,548,160

SHEET 05 [1F 14 INVI'ZNTOR. MLL/AM Synowy [Mas/l A woe/vars PATENTED DEC] 51976 SHEET 0 7 BF INVENTOR. ML L/AM 54M ocfy WELSH m PATENTEnuimslsm 3,548,160

SHEET UBUF 14 i a i U, I! [5% a \55 Z Q, v QED i la. ES \5ba l5bc. g 1

"' HUI:

IIIH {ma Ti 3.15. 87 U UUU U U UU UiU U UUUUUUUUUUU o o o o 03 oo o lbl innnnnm [i] i We] T jiii;

Mw w Bauer Mew/1 BY cum; W

7%M roam s PATENTEDUECISIQYB 3548160 SHEET USUF 14 IN VAN/UR. MAL/4M 5 940.40 Mas/1 APPARATUS FOR ENTERING DATA This application is a continuation-impart of my copending 0.8. application Ser. No. 303,487, filedAug. 21, 1963 and now abandoned.

This invention relates to apparatus for entering data into a data processing system and more particularly to apparatus for entering both fixed data from a code representation stored on a record as well as variable data into a data processing system.

Steps have been taken to apply automatic data processing techniques to business requirements such as those related to accounting, sales audits, credit control, billing, inventory control, and other marketing operations. For example, inconnection with the retailing of articles of apparel, each article is provided with a tag containing printed and punched information related to the description of the garment, size, color, style number, ticketed price, etc. Normally upon-sale of the article a portion of the tag which is generally provided in duplicate form is detached and stored by the clerk in order to have a record of the fixed data which is encoded upon the tag. At the time of the sale there is also a need to make a record of the variable data related to the transaction such as the date, the time of day, the actual sale or cash register price if different from the price on the tag, the identity-of the'store, the department, the clerk, etc. Tags stored by the sales clerk or cashier must later be mailed or transported to a data processing center where the tags are translated into tabulating cards or other media which are then used to process various analytical re ports.

Currently certain items of variable data can be recorded by means of a cash register device, but this results in the variable data being stored in the cash register record while the fixed data remains separately stored on the tag. With such an arrangement it is evident that the fixed and variable data must be subsequently correlated and placed upon a new record in order to be available for the entering of all of the data into a data processing system. The drawback of such an arrangement is not only the increased cost resulting from the handling of the data on a piecemeal basis and the necessary duplication of operations which results therefrom but also the delay in the time at which the correlated data is available for use in connection with the business. Anadvantage of having data related to the identity of the articles being sold available at the end of each business day or other short period of time enables the buyers to maintain asufficient stock of articles at all times and also prevents the undesired accumulation of an excessive quantity of any given article. ,A further advantage is that the quick availability of sales data can be of great value in a flexible pricing system to stimulate sales volume.

. It is one of the objects of the invention to provide a system for entering both fixed data from a code representation stored on a record and variable date into a data processing system.

It is another object of the invention to provide an apparatus for entering fixed data from a tag, ticket or card or the like containing code representations and for manually entering variable data by means of code representations into a data processing system.

It is still another object of the invention to provide an apparatus in which both fixed data from a record and variable data entered manually can be scanned to provide an output signal for inserting data in a data processing system.

It is an additional object of the'invention to provide an apparatus for forming a code. representation of variable data corresponding to the type of code representation employed for fixed data stored on a record. 4

It is a further object of the invention to provide an apparatus for scanningthe fixed data from a code representation on a record and for scanning the variable data from a code representation determined by a manual command in response to radiant energy conditioned by the code representations.

Still a further object of the invention is to provide an apparatus in which the output signal thereof is prevented from being inserted into a data processing system whenever a lack.

of parity occurs in the code representation being scanned.

It is also an object of the invention to provide a system for entering both fixed data and variable data by means of optical or magnetic code representations.

In one embodiment of the invention means are provided for receiving a record containing fixed data in the form of a code representation thereon. In addition, means are provided for forming a code representation of the variable data in response to a manual command. The apparatus further includes means for scanning the code representations of the record as well as the forming means in order to produce an output signal which is to be inserted into a data processing system. Such an apparatus enables the fixed data and the variable data related thereto to be scanned and entered together into a data processing system in order that all of the data pertinent to a transaction is correlated and made available at one time.

In another embodiment of the invention the apparatus ineludes means for accepting a record in the form of a tag, ticket fixed data to be derived from a tag, ticket or card and to be augmented at the time of the transaction by variable data.

In still another embodiment of the invention a single means is provided for scanning the code representations of not only the fixed data on the record but also those of the code representations of the forming means for the variable data in order to produce an output signal. Such a construction enables both forms of data to be entered together into the data processing system in a sequential manner which is well suited for data processing techniques. In addition, the embodiment simplifies the apparatus since a single scanning means is adapted to scan both types of data.

In an additional embodiment of the invention means for forming a code representation of the variable data in response to a manual command provides the same type of code representation that is stored on the record for the fixed data. Thus regardless of the code representation used for the fixed data, the apparatus can be conditioned to provide the same code representation for thevariable data. This construction enables the apparatus to be made compatible to a variety of types of code representations.

In a further embodiment of the invention means are provided for analyzing the output signal from the scanning means to determine whether an error has occurred in order to block the transmission of an erroneous output signal to the data processing system. This embodiment eliminates the possibility of entering incorrect or incomplete data into the; data processing system at the very inception of the error so that not only the processing system is safeguarded from being disrupted but corrective measures can be taken within the shortest possible time.

' In still a further embodiment of the invention the code representation of the fixed as well as variable data can be one of a plurality of representations such as optical or electrical representations.

These and other objects and features of the invention will become apparent from the following description when taken with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a block diagram of the elements of the system of the invention for entering both fixed and variable data;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the keyboard of the console of the apparatus of the invention;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary perspective view showing a portion of the keyboard of the console and a portion of the tape members of the console for forming a code representation of the variable data;

FIG. 4 is a vertical section view taken along the line 4-4 in FIG. 3 and showing a portion of the keyboard and means for moving a tape member for forming a code representation of the variable data;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary substantially horizontal section view taken along the line 5-5 in FIG. 4 and showing the drive to the scanner;

FIG. 6 is a substantially vertical section view taken along the line 6-6 in FIG. 4 and showing the tag and the tape members aligned adjacent to the predetermined position at which they are scanned;

FIG. 7 is an exploded perspective view of a portion of the keyboard of the apparatus;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary vertical section view of a portion of the keyboard showing a key in the actuated position engaging the stud of a tape member;

FIG. 9 is a perspective view showing a tape member moved to the predetermined position adjacent to the line of travel of the scanner;

FIG. 10 is an enlarged vertical section view taken along the line 10-10 in FIG. 9 and showing a clutch for moving a tape member;

FIG. 11 is an enlarged vertical section view taken along the (FIGS. 11-11 in FIG. 9 and showing the optical and light responsive elements of the scanner;

FIG. 12 is a fragmentary vertical section view showing rays of light passing through the code openings in the punched tag toward the scanner;

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary vertical section view showing rays of light passing through a code opening in a tape member;

FIG. 14 is a plan view of a punched tag of the type upon which the fixed data is stored;

FIG. 15 is a schematic representation of the electrical output circuit of the apparatus of the invention;

FIG. 16 is a schematic representation of the electrical circuits related to the drives for the scanner and the tape members;

FIG. 17 is a perspective view of a manually controlled tape device forentering fixed data;

FIG. 18 is an enlarged vertical section view showing another embodiment of the light-responsive elements of a scanner in an inverted position;

FIG. 19 is a plan view of the apertures of the scanner of FIG. 18;

FIG. 20 is an elevational view of a pair of lamps used in conjunction with the scanner of the invention and shows the elongated light pattern of the lamps which is applied to adjacent the code openings;

FIG. 21 is an elevational view of another arrangement of a pair of lamps for use with the scanner of the invention and shows the light pattern of the lamps which is applied adjacent to the code openings;

FIG. 22 shows a further arrangement of a lamp for the scanner of the invention in which the lamp is disposed along an axis perpendicular to the plane in which the code openings are disposed; I

FIG. 23 is a perspective view of an optical readout head having a plurality of thin photoconductive elements;

FIG. 24 is a perspective view ofa photocell which can be in the upper portion used in the scanner of the invention;

FIG. 25 is a schematic vertical section view of the console of the invention and shows the scanning drive for both. the scanner and the light source related thereto;

FIG. 26 is a schematic vertical section view of the console of the invention and showing a common power source connected to the drives for both the scanner and the lamps related to the scanner;

FIG. 27 is a plan view of a mask for supporting a coded ticket of the type shown in FIG. 28;

I of punched code openings for each field;

FIG. 32 is a fragmentary schematic representation of a circuit for connecting correspondingphotocells of a plurality of scanners such as shown in FIG. 3Q in parallel;

FIG. 33 is a perspective view of a, mirror arrangement for directing light energy emitted byeach' of the code openings toward its corresponding photocell;

FIG. 34 is a fragmentary vertical lse ion view showing a ray 1:

reflected of light after passing through a code opening'being by a mirror toward a photocell relatedit othe mirror;

FIG. 35 is a schematic vertical section view of the console of for driving the shaft which in turn actuates the tape members;

FIG. 38 is a vertical section view showing the consoleprovided with means for optically recording the code representations being scanned;

FIG. 39 is a block diagram showing a system including means for producing tone signals from the data being scanned;

FIG. 40 is a fragmentary perspective view of a system for scanning magnetic recordings from tape members and tags, cards or tickets;

FIG. 41 shows the face of a ticket having a plurality of magnetically recorded code data thereon;

FIG. 42 shows the face of a ticket adapted tobe attached to merchandise and containing visual data;

FIG. 43 shows the faceof a ticket adapted to be attached to merchandise and containing visual data;

FIG. 44. shows the face of a ticket adapted to be attached to merchandise and containing a reduced number of code openings; 1

FIG. 45 shows the face of a ticket having-two overlying and interlaced fields of code openings, each of the fields having a reduced number of code openings therein;

FIG. 46 shows a portion of a tape member of the invention having aplurality of columns of code groupings disposed at locations along the length of the tape member;-

FIG. 47 is a fragmentary perspective viewshowing a mask having an adjustable aperture used in connection with the scanning of the tape members;

FIG. 48 is a fragmentary perspective'view showing an adjustable mask which can be aligned with one or more of the plurality of columnsof code groupings on the tape member;

FIG. 49 is a fragmentary vertical section view of an adjustable mask overlying the code openings in the tape member;

FIG. 50 is a fragmentary vertical section view showing an adjustable mask for use in simultaneously scanning a pair of columns of code openings;

FIG. 51 is a block diagram representation of a circuit for interlocking the console of the invention with a paper tape punch device; and

FIG. 52 is a block diagram representation of the system of the invention showing an arrangement forsensing the transmission of data from the console to the recording or data processing means.

The apparatus of the invention for entering fixed data and for entering variable data into a data processing system includes console 20 (FIG. 2). The record having the code representation thereon of the fixed data to be entered into a data processing system can comprise tag 21 of the type shown in FIG. 14. Tag 21 includes portions 21d and 21b which are attached to one another along tear line 210. Each portion which contains a duplicate'of the punch code information of the other portion is provided with guide holes 22 and 23 which are adapted to engage pins 24 and 25 extending from theupper surface of tag support 26 (FIGS. 2 and 3). The tagsupport serves as the means for receiving the record into the console. The pins of the support and the holes in the tag are of dissimilar forms to insure that the tag is properly positioned on the tag support.

Tag 21, for example, is arranged in the form of vertically extending columns 27 and five horizontally extending channels 28 (FIG. 14). Tags with a greater-number of columns, such as 31, can also be employed. Two punched holes or openings 29, each one of which is disposed in different channels of the five channels in a single column, serve as code representations of numerical data, such as a digit, in accordance with a code scheme, for example a two-bit binarytype code. In the case of applying the system of the invention to a business sales operation, tags 21 areprepared in advance for each article which is to be handled within the provisions of the business data processing system. In the case of an article of apparel, tag 21 as shown in in FIG. 14, is encoded to include various items of fixed data such as size-style, season, color, vendor, etc., of the article and its ticketed price. The tag also contains printed or direct reading information corresponding to the coded data such as size 18" and the price of $7.95. Each digit or letter of the items of fixed information is encoded in a single column. Thus three columns are required to encode the digits of the price $7.95. The code scheme shown in the example of tag 21 necessarily requires two openings 29 in each column in order to correctly record the data. In the event that the device which prints and punches the tags fails to punch two bits of code in the form of two openings in any column due to a broken punch pin in the device, thousands of tags can get into the system-each having one or more columns of coded data which cannot be decoded. The absence of one of the two openings in a column of the code causes a lack of parity in the code.

With tag 21 replaced upon tag support 26 and with openings 22 and 23 engaged with pins 24 and 25, respectively, the tag support is rotated about pivot (FIG. 2) until the tag support is moved into its operable position within console 20. In this position solenoid 31 latches the tag support in the operable position against a spring bias force from means not shown which normally urge the tag support to its outermost position (FIG. 3).

In the combined operation of entering fixed data and variable data into a data processing system, it is necessary for the human operator to enter the variable data into the console by manual command. The means for forming a code representation of the variable data in response to a manual command includes keyboard 32 having keys 33. The keys-are arranged in a number of vertically extending columns or decades 34 needed to suit the system. Where the console'is used in conjunction with retailing, for example, a total of nine columns can be used. The five columns at the left of thekeyboard serve as markdown field" or register price 35 into'which variable data representing a marked down or discount price is entered into the apparatus. The marked down or discount price is distinguished from the ticketed or list price which is both printed and punched in tag 21. Thus-as is shown in FIG. 14 at the right edge of the tag as viewed in the drawing, the marked down sale price of $4.90 has been marked on the tag by the Each of decades 34 of keys is formed as a subassembly or module (FIGS. 4 and 7 and includes keys 33 for each of the digits from one to nine and in addition includes keys 38 and 39. Each decade includes means for supporting body portion 40 of the keys for reciprocating motion in predetermined opposite directions, that is, plate 41 containing guide slots 42 through which body portion 40 of a key extends. Stops 43 which are punched from the body portion and extend at an angle thereto form notches 44. Spring 45 biases the key in an upward direction until stop 43 engages the undersurface of plate 41. The keys are additionally supported for movement in the vertical direction by slot 46a in plate 46 which is spaced apart from plate 41 by sleeves 47 through which retaining bolts 48 extend (FIG. 8). Cam member 49 extends adjacent to end portion 40a of body portion 40 which is disposed opposite to end portion 40b of the body portion. Cap 50 is mounted on end portion 40b to receive the manual command or input to the keyboard. End 40a of the body portion adjacent to cam member 49 is adapted to engage an element to be actuated by key 33.

Positioned adjacent to plate 46 and spaced therefrom by spacer 51 is follower member 52 having slots or followers 520. Follower member 52 includes elongated openings 53 which enable follower member 52 to be reciprocated along the axis .of column 34 of keys 33. Thus follower member 52 can reciprocate between sleeve 47 and spacer 51 (FIGS. 4 and 7). Column 34 is supported with respect 'to frame members 54 and 55' of console 20 (FIGS. 4 and 8) by engagement with slots 54a and 55a, respectively, therein, By means of adjustment set screws 56, disposed in threaded holes 54b and 55b of frame members 54 and 55, respectively, and engaged with the opposite end portions of plate 4-1, the relative position of plate 41 and column 34 with respect to the frame members and therefore the relative position of column 34 with respect to the console can be determined by moving the column to the right or left as seen in FIG. 4. After adjustment, each of the set screws are locked relative to the frame members by a nut engaged therewith.

As shown in FIG. 8 upon the application of a manual command by depressing one of the plurality of keys 33, the biasing force of spring 45 is overcome and body portion 40 of the key is depressed. As the key moves downwardly, slot 42 in plate 41 and slot 46a in plate 46 support and guide the bodyportion of the key. As the key is moved downwardly, cam member 49 engages slot or follower 52a of follower member 52. The result of the engagement between the cam member and the follower is to urge follower member 52 toward the left against the biassales-clerk as opposed to the ticketed price of $7.95 which is both printed and punched on the tag. The marked down price is printed. but not also punched on the tag subsequent to its original preparation since only the ticketed price information is known at the time of preparing the tagvAttempts are not made to punch the marked down price in the tag since it is extremely difficult to register a later set of punched data accurately withpreviously applied punched data.

In markdown field 35 of the keyboard, the extreme right two columns can serve for the entry of the'decimal portion of the price, such as for example, $4.90. Thus 90, representing ninety cents, is entered in the extreme right column and the three columns tothe left thereof are arranged to receive the dollar portion of the price, such as 4 of $4.00, which can be entered as 004. further by way of example, the three columns to the right of markdown field. 35 can form clerk identity number field 36. Column 37 'at the extreme right of the keyboard can be employed to enter other data concerning the nature of the type of transaction such as cash, charge, hold, C.0.D., take, send, etc.

ing force of spring 58 as viewed in FIG. 8. As the key approaches its downwardrnost position,-follower 52a is engaged by the high portion of the cam member and is urged to the left as shown in FIG. 8. This movement causes any key engaged with follower 52a to be released upwardly. When the upper end portion of the cam member passes beyond follower 52a, the follower enters notch 44 under the urging of spring 58. At this point stop 43 engages the upper surface of follower member 52 and prevents any further downward motion thereof. Upon the removal of the manual command applied to cap 50 of key 33, the key remains in the downward or actuated position due to the locking action accomplished by the engagement of follower 53a with notch 44. In the actuated position of the key, end portion 40a of the actuated key is sub stantially below those of the remaining keys in the decade and thereby is adapted to engage an element which is to be controlled by the key.

The means for entering variable data into a data processing system further includes tape member or tape 59 (FIG. 9). The tape member can be a resilient metallic tape disposed about idler pulley 60 rotatably mounted on shaft 61. Flanges 60a of the idler pulley serve to maintain tape 59 properly aligned with the pulley as it is wound thereon. The code representation of the variable data to be entered by means of keys 33, 38 and 39 is applied to the tape in the form of groupings 62 of openings or holes 63 disposed at intervals along the length of the tape. Each grouping of openings 63 is disposed along column 64 and in two of channels 65a with the same code scheme as that employed for tag 21. Starting at the portion of tape 59in the right of FIG. 9 the groupings are disposed in an order that is reverse to that of keys 33 in decade 34 (FIG. 2).

the wound form is substantially constant regardless of the extent of the spring which has been unwound. Spring material of this type is manufactured by the Hunter Spring Company under the trademark Negator. Because of the spring nature of tape 59, it maintains itself in a wound position with respect to pulley 60 and clutch 66.

Clutch 66 includes housing 67, the outer portion of which, between flanges 68, serves to receive tape 59 for both storing and moving the tape. Housing 67 is rotatively supported with respect to drive shaft 69 by means ofbearing 70. Within the interior of housing 67 there is disposed. member 71 of permeable material fastened adjacent to the base portion of the housing. Member 72 of permeable material is mounted on support 73 which in turn is attached to shaft 69 and secured thereto by key 74. At least one of members 71 and 72 is permanently magnetized so that the magnetic attraction between the members urges them toward one another. Thrust washer 72a maintains members 71 and 72 spaced apart from one another and thereby establishes an air gap between them. Thrust washer 72acan be formed from plastic material such as nylon. Eddy currents within the facing members in the presence of relative 'motion therebetween is capable of transmitting rotary motion from shaft 69 to housing 67. The strength ofthe magnetic field t and the magnitude of the air gap between members 71 and 72 1 determines the torque which clutch 66 can transmit.

The rotation of shaft 69 is coupled by clutch 66 to tape 59 and advances tape 59 in the direction of the arrow shown in FIG. 9 until stud or stop 75 engages end portion 40a of the body member of the key which has been depressed. This func tion occurs for each of tapes 59 disposed beneath decade 34 when shaft 69 rotates the plurality of clutches 66. After stop 75 engages an actuated key, the tape is held and clutch 66 slips as shaft 69 continuesto rotate. The slipping of clutch 66 applies a tensile force to tape 59 and draws it taut with'respect to stop 75 engaged with the actuated key so that the positioning of the tape can be accurately controlled. The position of the actuated key 'in, each decade determines the extent of travel of the tape so that grouping 62 of openings 63 of each tape is moved toa predetermined position, namely, that overlying window 76 in mask 77. The axial adjustment arrangement provided for decade 34 insures that the tape is accurately located with respect to the predetermined position. Bar 78 by .bearing upon the upper surface of tape 59 urges the tape toward the upper surface of mask 77 so that the tape passes directly over window 76.

Key 38 at the upper end of decade 34 when depressed prevents tape 59 from advancing to engage any of the keys beyond key 38 and thus prevents the length of tape 59 having code openings from being advanced to the predetermined position adjacent mask 77. Thus key 38 effectively locks out a column of keys from causing the entry of data since it maintains an uncoded portion of tape 59 adjacent mask 77 which prevents the developing of an output signal. Key 39 is adapted to clear column 34 of any key which" has been depressed. Since slot 39a is at the opposite side of key 39 as compared to keys 33, key 39 cannot be locked by follower 52. Due to the location of key 39 at a distance from tape 59, key 39 cannot engage stop 75 so that tape 59 can be advanced beneath all of the keys until the stop engages bar 78. The code in tape 59 overlying mask 77 when stop 75 is held by bar 78 is that representing zero. Thus the actuation of key 38 prevents entry of data by the column while actuation of key 39 clears all of the keys and causes a zero tribe entered automatically as in the case where keyboard entry starts with all columns cleared.

When shaft 69 is rotated in a direction which drives tape 59 in a direction opposite to that of the arrow in FIG. 9, stop 75 having screw 79 securing the stop to the tape advances toward bar 80 until a position is reached at which end portion 79a of the screw contacts the bar and prevents further reverse motion of the tape (FIG. 4). With the tape held from moving, clutch 66 slips as shafi 69 continues to rotate. The position of the tape at which end portion 79a contacts bar 80 corresponds to the rest or deactivated condition of the tape. When the tape is in the deactivated position, the portion of the tape overlying window 76 does not contain openings 63. Since tape 59 passes over bar 80 as the tape leaves idler pulley 60, bar 80 can additionally serve as a support or guide for the tape.

The means of scanning the code representations of the record, that is, tag 21, and the code representations .of the forming means, that is, grouping 62 of openings 63 in tapes 59, includes scanner 81 (FIG. 9). Housing 83 .of scanner 81 has bushings 83 mounted on guide rods 84. This arrangement enables the scanner to move with a reciprocating motion, that is, in a back and forth manner, along the guide rods. In an embodiment in which the scanner is to be responsive to radiant energy, the upper portion of the scanner disposed beneath mask 77 contains opening 85 in which is disposed mount 86 supporting lens 87 (FIGS. 9 and 11). Adjacent to the bottom portion of housing 82 of seanner-81 there is disposed means responsive to radiant energy such as a plurality of photosensitive semiconductor devices 88. In the case of a code representation in which there are five channels to a column, such as the code employed for tags .21 and tapes 59, a semiconductor device is provided for each of'the channels. Consequently, the housing contains five semiconductor devices which are spaced apart adjacent to one another. Sensitive portion 89 of the semiconductor devices is disposed in a plane which is substantially at right angles to the plane of tape 59 and extends through the central axis thereof.

The source of radiant energy for the scanning means includes tubular lamp 90 which extends across the console above and adjacent to mask 77 in order to direct radiant energy toward the openings in the tapes passing over window 76 as well as to the openings in tag 21. Where photosensitive semiconductor devices are employed, tubular lamp 90 can be of the incandescent type.

As shown in FIGS. 6 and 7, scanner 81 is adapted to be moved along guide rods 84 from the right side to the left side of console 20. At the starting position of the scan at the-right side of the console scanner 81 is positioned beneath tag support 26. Prior to the beginning of a scan, tag support 26 is moved inwardly by rotating it about pivot 30 to an activated position thereof in which opening 26a of the tag support which exposes the portion of the tag containing the columns and channels of code representation is overlying opening 76a in the mask (FIGS. 3 and 6). In the activated position ofthe tag support, the tag is disposed in a plane spaced at a predetermined distance from lens 87 of the scanner in order that light passing from tubular lamp 90 and through openings 29 in tag 21 can be properly focused by lens 87 upon photosensitive semiconductor devices 89.

In certain instances, tag support 26 can be provided with groupings of code openings adjacent to the location at which tag 21 .is mounted an overlying opening 76a in the mask. These groupings enable fixed data to be entered independently of tag 21. Similarly a semipermanent plate having fixed data code therein can be mounted on support 26 in place of tag 21 where there is no need to vary the fixed data for each transaction. When the console is to be operated to receive variable data only, tag support 26 is left in its outward position (FIG. 2) in which portion 26b of the support overlies opening 76a in the mask and blocks the passage of light therethrough.

Prior to the beginning of a scan, the plurality of tapes 59 is moved in the direction of the arrow in FIG. 9 by the, drive of clutches 66 so that stop 75 of each of the tapes is engaged by end portions 400 of the keysreht ted thereto. In this condition the code representation of each of the tapes which corresponds to actuated keys 33 is moved to the predetermined position overlying their respective window 76 in mask 77. As shown in FIGS. 6 and 13 at the predetermined position above windows 76, tape 59 is supported by guides 77a extending upwardly from mask 77 and having shoulders 77b which maintain the alignment of the tapes. As shown in FIGS. 12 and 13, the spacing between tag 21 and tape 59 with respect to lamp 90 is the same, that is to say, the tapes and tag are disposed in the same horizontal plane overlying the predetermined position above the line along which windows 76 and 76a are disposed in order that light passing either through the openings in tag 21 or the openings in tapes 59 is properly focused by lens 87 upon photosensitive semiconductor devices 88.

As viewed in FIG. 9 when openings 63 in the channel furthest to the right in grouping 62. are disposed at the predetermined position overlying window 76, the semiconductor device of the plurality furthest to the left is subjected to the light passing through the opening in the tape and lens 87. In a similar manner the location of the channel'in which the second opening of a grouping is positioned determines the second semiconductor device that is actuated. Tapered shields 91 form wedge-shaped openings 92 therebetween which forms a slot extending parallel to the line of travel'of the tape adjacent to the semiconductor devices (F IGS; 9 and 11). This arrangement prevents projected beams of light from each successive column 27 being scanned from inadvertently conflicting with the beam adjacent thereto. Thus shields 91' prevent crosstalk of light from one of columns 27 of tag 21 to the next. In order to facilitate the focusing of the light upon the semiconductor devices, lens mount 86 can be selectively positioned in the vertical direction by means of adjusting screw 93 (FIG. 9).

The means for moving scanner 81 during its cycle of operation includes toothed belt 94 which isengaged to housing 82 of the scanner by coupling 95 (FIG. Belt 94 which extends about idler pulley 96 is driven by pulley 97 actuated by scanning motor 98. In order to insure that the scanner move at a predetermined accurate scanning speed, scanning motor 98 may be of the hysteresis synchronous type. As the scanner is moved from the right to the left of the console as seen in FIGS.

5 and 6, the scanner "first scans the fixed data of the code representations in tag support 26, if any, and then that of tag 21. .Ifsupport 26 is positioned outwardly, portion 26b thereof blocks the passage of light to the scanner during the initial portion of the scanning cycle. Thus for each column of opening in the tag, light is admitted through the pair of openings to two of the photosensitive semiconductor devices in the scanner. As the scanner advances beyond any given column of openings in tag 21, there is an interruption in the passage of light to the scanner until it passes beneath the pair of openings in the next adjacentcolumn of the tag. In this manner the scanner scans or reads the tag in a sequential manner from the right to the left of the tag as the scanning process continues. Thus it can be seen that a pair of the semiconductor devices responds for each column of the tag containing a pair of openings.

Subsequently the scanner advances beneath the plurality of tapes 59 and again the semiconductor devices are exposed to the light passing through the pair of openings in the grouping locate at the predetermined position above the-line of travel of the scanner. Since the scanner travels at a uniform speed and since the spacing between tapes 59 is greater than that between columns 27 of openings 29 in tag 21, there are greater time intervals between the response of the semiconductor devices as they pass beneath the tapes as compared to pasing beneath the tag. If desired, the motor can be operated at an increased speed when driving the scanner past the tapes to maintain uniform intervals between the responses of the scannerL'lhe scan is completed when the scanner has passed beneath tape 59 adjacent to the left side of the console as seen in FIGS. 5 and 6.

The manual actuation of switch 99 entitled "Power" (FIG. 2) energizes lines 100 and 101 (FIG. 16) of the apparatus. Indicator lamp 102 marked Power in FIG. 2 can be connected to lines 101 and 102 to show that the console is energized. Prior to a scanning operation, tag 21 is inserted into the console, if fixed data from the tag is required, and the manual commands are inserted into keyboard 32. At this time scanner 81 is at its starting position adjacent to the right side of the console as viewed in FIGS. 5 and 6. The actuation of "Sean" button 103 (FIG. 2) momentarily closes switch 104 connected to line 101 to begin the scan cycle (FIG. 16). The closing of switch 104 energizes relay winding 105 through switch 106 which is connected by terminals 149 and 150 (FIGS. 15 and 16) and normally closed relay switch 1520 of relay 152 to line 101. Switch 106 is connected to relay winding 105 whenever the scanner is at the extreme right position by being operated by engagement with the scanner.

The energizing of relay winding 105 causes relay switch 107, which is connected through line -108 to line 100, to be connected to line 109. The actuation of relay switch 107 to line 109 serves to energize tubular lamp 90, winding 98a of motor 98 through line.ll0, and winding 111a of motor 111 which drives shaft 69 connected to clutches 66. The actuation of relay switch 112 in response to the energizing of relay winding 105 connects switch 112 through line 113 which completes a holding circuit for relay winding 105 after the opening of switch 104.

Motor 111 is selected to have a sufficiently high torque to cause shaft 69 and the clutches engaged therewith to drive each of the tapes to the point at which their respective stops 75 encounter actuated keys 33 of the keyboard prior to the point at which the scanner is driven by motor 98 to a position where the scanner approaches the tape beneath the right column of the keyboard. This insures that the groupings of the tapes corresponding to the variable data are properly advanced to the predetermined position prior to their scanning. At the end of the scan after the scanner has passed beneath the tape of the left column in the keyboard, scanner 81 encounters and actuates switch 106, thereby connecting it to solenoid 31 which unlatches tag support 26. Upon being unlatched, the spring bias of the tag support swings it outwardly. The actuation of switch 106 also deenergizes relay winding 105, thereby releasing switches 107 and 112. The release of switch 107 connects line 108 to switch 114 and line 115 and thereby energizes winding 11lb of motor 111 and reverses it. In addition line 115 energizes line 1l6-connected to winding 98b of motor 98 and reverses it. The reversal of motor 111 serves to drive back all of the plurality of tapes 59 until end portions 790 of screws 79 extending through stops 75 encounter bar 80. The reversal of motor 98 drives scanner 81 toward the right portion of the console.

The release of switch 107 opens the circuit from line 108 to line 109 and results in the deenergizing of winding 98a and 1110 as well as lamp 90. With the lamp deenergized there is no light transmitted to the semiconductor devices during the return motion of the scanner and consequently, no output therefrom. Return of the scanner to the starting position at the right side of the console causes it to engage switch 114 and to open it, thereby opening the connection to line 115 and deenergizing motor windings 98b and 111k. At this point the cycle of operation has been completed and the console is ready for a subsequent cycle. Counter 117 records the number of cycles which have occurred and knob 118 enables the operator to reset the digital reading of the counter. Scan" lamp 119 is illuminated during the scanning cycle.

Output logic circuit 120 (FIGS. 1 and 15) includes the plurality of semiconductor devices 88 in scanner 81. The semiconductor devices are commonly connected to line 121 and each are connected to individual lines 122 in circuit with actuating elements 123, such as the code magnets of a paper tape punch recorder 134. Whenever such a recorder is in an inoperable condition due to a failure therein or due to the exhausting or jamming of the recording paper tape, indicator lamp 1340 marked Tape" is lighted in order to notify the

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3648024 *Apr 28, 1970Mar 7, 1972Philips CorpSensing device
US3674989 *Feb 12, 1971Jul 4, 1972Ncr CoPunch card controlled accounting machine
US3737629 *Jun 9, 1971Jun 5, 1973Addressograph MultigraphOptical code reader
US3755656 *Feb 26, 1971Aug 28, 1973Litton Business Systems IncData processing system
US3760162 *Nov 9, 1970Sep 18, 1973Smiths Industries LtdPhotoelectric readers
US3775594 *Oct 9, 1970Nov 27, 1973Polaroid CorpEncoded identification card system
US3837570 *Apr 1, 1970Sep 24, 1974Standard Oil CoData receiving storing and imprinting apparatus
US4602151 *Dec 21, 1983Jul 22, 1986Erling PerssonTag reader
US4719338 *Aug 12, 1985Jan 12, 1988Ncr CorporationPocket calculator with credit card controller and dispenser
US6312175Mar 31, 1999Nov 6, 2001Logic Controls, Inc.Integrated keyboard input device
Classifications
U.S. Classification708/141, 235/145.00R, 400/366, 400/63
International ClassificationG06F3/06, G06K1/12, G06K1/14, G06F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationG06K1/12, G06F3/002, G06F3/06, G06K1/14
European ClassificationG06K1/12, G06F3/00B, G06F3/06, G06K1/14