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Publication numberUS3548506 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 22, 1970
Filing dateMay 20, 1968
Priority dateMay 20, 1968
Publication numberUS 3548506 A, US 3548506A, US-A-3548506, US3548506 A, US3548506A
InventorsFrancis H Harrington
Original AssigneeFrancis H Harrington
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Finger ring gauges
US 3548506 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1970 F. H. HARRINGTON I 7 FINGER RING GAUGES Filed May 20, 1968 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 I NVENTOR 3W a, ygg wm a Dec. 22, 1970 HARRlNGTON 3,548,506

.FINGER RING GAUGES Filed May 20, 1968 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VE N TO I 4 J FFfl/VOE M H/VRR/A/GM ATTORNEY 1970 F. H. HARRINGTON 3,543,506

FINGER RING GAUGES med May 20, 1968 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 1970 F. H. HARRINGTON FINGER RING GAUGES 4 Sheets-Sheet 6.

Filed May 20, 1968 ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,548,506 FINGER RING GAUGES Francis H. Harrington, 200 Winnacunnet Road, Hampton, N.H. 03842 Filed May 20, 1968, Ser. No. 730,357 Int. Cl. G01b 3/34 U.S. Cl. 33-178 12 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A finger ring gauge comprising a carrying member of either planar card or strip form, and a plurality of gauging rings calibrated in increments of ring sizes mounted on and normally fixedly secured thereto by a readily frangible connection, thus enabling any one of said gauge rings to be removed from the carrying member and worn if desired for a period of time.

This invention relates to improvements in finger ring gauging means and more particularly in a finger ring gauging means of a type enabling a prospective purchaser of a ring to determine the size of ring best suited to his or her finger by an actual Wear test conducted with a socalled dummy ring, i.e. a rang simulating at least generally the ring which he or she desires to purchase but which is in fact a ring gauge.

As is Well known, standard ring sizes are in multiples of one-half size which increase in increments of .016" plus or minus, with rings sizes normally running from 3 to 8 inclusive in womens sizes and from 8 to 13 inclusive in mens sizes. Individual ring size is customarily determined on a trial and error basis by the use of twentytwenty-five round gauges in the form of rings calibrated in finger ring sizes which are usually held together by a circular wire.

Since determination of the particular size suited to a particular finger being fitted for a ring is largely a matter of decision of the person sizing the finger, with interpretation as to proper ring size varying from individual to individual performing the measuring operation, errors in sizing arising from poor judgment on the part of said individual are not uncommon. Another cause of error arising particularly in so-called group sizing, a term applied to sizing of large groups of students in schools for class rings, for example, is the time limitation imposed on the person or persons performing the sizing operation, which is generally necessary so as not to unduly interfere with academic schedules. Obviously, a group sizing conducted on a rush basis is not conducive to determination of proper ring size in all cases. Yet another cause of error is that, through their frequent use, some of the twentytWenty-five individual ring gauges employed become bent or distorted, as results in an improper determination of size. Still another major cause of error which has been long appreciated in the trade but for which no solution has been advanced until the present time is the fact that finger ring size varies with conditions of weather, season of the year, time of day, emotional stress, swelling from body fluids, and physical weight variations.

But whatever the cause of error, it is conservatively estimated that one-fourth to one-third of school rings made to the sizes determined by the ring-sizing procedure and gauges now in current use, when delivered, do not fit properly. And of these, a substantial percentage is 'ice usually so seriously misfitted that re-sizing at the ring manufacturers expense (costing two to five dollars per ring) is required.

Stated broadly, an object of the invention is the provision of simple yet effective, practical and dependable finger-size gauging means serving to enable the prospective purchaser of a finger ring to determine, by actual wear of a chosen one of a plurality of dummy or mockup finger rings supplied to him (or her) by the ring manufacturer and/or its representative for this purpose but which are in fact finger-size gauge rings, of the particular gauge ring which seems best suited to his or her finger.

Another general object of the invention is the provision of finger ring sizing or gauging means, by the use of which the necessity of re-sizing delivered rings is virtually eliminated.

Another important object of the envention is the provision of finger ring sizing or gauging means ideally suited to the sale of finger rings by mail.

Still another object of the invention is the provision of a finger ring sizing or gauging means by which group sizing, as the term is applied to the sizing of a large group of students for class or school rings, for example, may be accomplished in a fraction of the time required in group sizing by the use of standard ring gauges, and thus without any substantial disruption of class or other academic schedules.

Yet another object of the invention is the provision of finger ring sizing or gauging means which is Well adapted to the sizing of rings for persons living in rural areas and/or for students in rural schools who previously paid a premium for delivered rings because of the inclusion in the cost thereof that of their own or the ring manufacturers representatives travel expenses necessary to the proper fitting of said rings.

The above and other objects and features of advantage of finger ring sizing means according to the present invention will be apparent or obvious from the the following detailed description thereof, taken with the accompanying illustrative drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of one form of finger ring gauging means according to the present invention intended for the sizing of womens (girls) rings;

FIG. 2 is a section taken along line 2--2 of FIG 1;

FIG. 3 is a view similar to 'FIG. 1 but illustrating a ring gauging means of the invention intended for the sizing of mens (boys) rings;

FIG. 4 is a section taken along line 44 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary plan view of a ring gauging means of the type shown in FIG 3 but incorporating oval rather than round gauge rings; and

FIGS. 6-10 inclusive are views generally similar to FIGS. 15 but illustrating a modified form of finger ring gauging means according to the invention, of which FIGS. '6 and 7 are plan views of such modified gauging means broken down into two size groups, one (FIG. 6) for gauging girls sizes and the other (FIG. 7) for gauging womens ring sizes, with FIG. 6A being a plan view showing one of the gauging rings broken away from its carrying member and FIG. 7A being a section taken along line AA of FIG. 7; FIGS. 8 and 9 are plan views of the finger ring gauging means of the modified form broken down into two size groups for the sizing of boys, and mens rings, respectively, with FIG. 8A showing one of 3 the rings broken away from its carrier member and FIG. 9A have a section taken along line AA of FIG. 9; and FIG. 10 is a fragmentary view of a ring gauging means of the modified from which incorporates oval-shaped gauging rings rather than the more conventional round gauging rings.

Referring to the drawings in detail, and first considering the form of finger ring gauging means illustrated in FIGS. 15 inclusive, such basically comprises a plurality of finger ring gauging rings mounted on and preferably integral with a carrying member consisting of a stiff, plane card or sheet, and which additionally are so connected to said card or sheet that any one of the rings may be readily broken away therefrom, thereafter to serve as an individual gauging ring. More particularly, reference numeral 12A, FIG. 1, and reference numeral 12B, FIG. 3, designate relatively stiff planar card-form carrying members of rectangular shape which mount a plurality of finger ring gauging rings generally designated 10A and 10B, respectively. It is a feature of the invention that such gauging rings are initially fixedly secured to the cards mounting same so as to form therewith a self-contained finger ring gauging card for use in substitution of the aforesaid twenty-twenty-five individual gauging rings carried on a circular wire as currently used in determining finger ring size.

It is explained at this point that the only difference between the gauging cards shown in FIGS. 1 and 3 is that the FIG. 1 gauging card is intended for use in gauging the ring size of womens fingers, and the gauging card according to FIG. 3 is intended for use in gauging the ring size of mens fingers. While it is possible to fabricate the gauging cards so that one such card incorporates the full range of both womens and mens gauging rings, it is preferred that the gauging cards be segregated according to mens and womens ring sizes, such for the very practical reason that it is contemplated that cards of the one size will be distributed only to women and girls and cards of the other size will be distributed only to men and boys.

The plurality of gauging rings 10A, 10B are suitably held to and in the plane of their respective cards 12A, 12B. preferably by narrow-width, readily frangible connecting webs 14A, 14B which preferably are integral with and extend between the cards proper and the outer edges of said gauging ring at spaced points along the ring periphery, such of course assuming that the gauging rings 10A, 10B and their respective carrying cards 12A, 12B are fabricated from the same material. Preferably, the gauging rings and their carrying cards are so fabricated as by injection molding same from a suitable plastic as facilitates said rings, their carrying cards and the aforesaid connecting webs 14A, 14B being made integral and to the form of a shape-sustaining, generally planar unit capable of being distributed to and handled as such by a prospective purchaser.

It will be further understood from a consideration of FIGS. 1 and 3 that the gauging rings 10A and 10B thereof are calibrated in increments of ring half sizes, with the rings 10A of the card 12A (FIG. 1) being calibrated in girls and womens ring sizes 3-8 inclusive and the gauging rings 10B of the card 12B (FIG. 3) being calibrated in boys and mens ring sizes 8-13. Preferably also, each of the gauging rings as initially incorporated into the gauging cards is clearly marked with its own ring size. Thus, when any one or more of the gauging rings are broken away from their carrying card proper, the ring size thereof may be readily ascertained merely by visual inspection of the size marking inscribed thereon.

Further, the gauging rings 10A, 10B are preferably fashioned to have an overall configuration at least generally simulating that of the ring or rings to be purchased. Thus, as best seen in FIGS. 2 and 4, the gauging rings have axial dimension, i.e. axial thickness, which substantially greater than the thickness of the card proper carrying same, and a radial dimension corresponding to that of an actual finger ring. Illustratively, the gauging rings are provided with radially outwardly extending formations designated 16A and 16B (FIGS. 1 and 3) which simulate the crown or the fitting for the stone or equivalent of class or school rings. Such formations may be usefully employed in providing the relatively small gauging rings 10A, 10B with the space necessary for the inscription of the aforesaid ring size marking thereon.

The ring-gauging card designated 12C partially shown in FIG. 5 is generally similar to that shown in FIG. 3, differing therefrom only in that the gauging rings incorporated therein are of oval rather than round or circular form. In explanation, very few ring fingers are truly round or circular in section but instead they have oval configuration of varying degree. While no recognition is usually given to ovally configured as distinguished from substantially round fingers when sizing (including group sizing) for the relatively inexpensive ringe, it is well known, when sizing for the more expensive rings, for example, college rings and high-price rings sold by jewelry stores, to determine proper ring size by the use of oval, rather than true circular or round, gauging rings. Thus, FIG. 5 may be taken as illustrative of ring-size gauging cards constructed according to the present invention and which incorporate oval rather than round gauging rings, with the term oval as herein used meaning gauging rings which have vertical diameter substantially equal to the uniform diameter of the round gauging ring, but whose transverse diameter is less by a few thousandths of an inch than said vertical diameter. In short, the invention provides a finger ring gauging card suitable to the determination of finger ring size for the more expensive as well as for the less expensive rings.

Referring now to FIGS. 6l0, which illustrate a modified finger ring gauging means according to the invention, such differs in no substantial way from the earlier described ring-gauging cards except as respects the structural form and configuration of the carrying member. Thus, whereas the earlier described form of ring-size gauging means employs a planar card or sheet-type carrying member, the ring-size gauging means according to the FIGS. 6-10 form employs a ring-carrying and mounting member of elongate strip or bar form. More particularly, the gauging rings designated 20A and 20A are mounted on baror strip-form carrying members designated 22A 22A FIGS. 6 and 7, and the gauging rings 20B 20B are similarly mounted on baror strip-form carrying members designated 22B 22B FIGS. 8 and 9. Illustratively, the means providing connections between the individual gauging rings and their strip-form carrying members are shown to take the form of projections 24 FIGS. 6 and 7, and 24 FIGS. 8 and 9, which extend integrally from a longitudinal side edge of said strip-form members and terminate in sharply pointed ends which integrally connect with the outer edges of the ring gauging rings. Said projections also provide sufficient face area for the inscription of the size number of each gauging ring.

As best seen in FIG. 9A, the overall configuration of the individual gauging rings 20A 20B may more closely approach that of a class or school ring than does the gauging rings of the FIGS. 1-4 form. Hence, when worn for a few days, for example, the prospective ring purchaser (student) is able not only to determine if the selected one of the gauging rings provides his proper ring size, but also to acquaint himself with the feel of the ring to be purchased.

It is further explained that FIGS. 6 and 7 illustrate ring gauging means according to the invention broken down into sizes suitable for girls rings, on the one hand, and womens, on the other. Similarly, FIGS. 8 and 9 show ring gauging means as herein contemplated broken down into boys sizes (FIG. 8) and mens sizes (FIG. 9). It is to be understood that such size grouping of gauging rings is optional and that it may be varied without departing from the scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

FIG. illustrates that the gauging rings therein designated C employed in the stripor bar-form of gauging means shown in FIGS. 6-9 may also be made oval rather than truly round, thus to satisfy the need of a ring-gauging means designed for gauging or sizing fingers for the more expensive rings.

Finger ring gauging means according to the invention are designed and admirably suited for distribution as a self-contained unit, preferably by hand together with an instruction and order form, to the students of a class or school to be fitted for a class or school ring, or by mail to students of rural schools and/or to persons living in rural areas who are desirous of being or required to be fitted at home for a ring to be purchased from a mail order house or a city jewelry store. Thus, each student or prospective purchaser of a ring (for convenience referred to as the buyer) will receive a full set of actual gauging rings in plastic, metal or other suitable material incorporated as an integral part in a card or mounted on a stripor bar-type carrying means, but which,can be readily broken away from said card and/or strip. By inserting the ring finger into the graduated size-openings provided by the series of gauging rings, the buyer is able to select the particular gauging ring which he considers to best fit his ring finger. Since all gauging rings are so attached to their carrying member that they may be easily broken away therefrom for a wear test, the buyer may now wear the selected gauging ring until satisfied that such is his proper size. On the other hand, if the buyer finds it necessary to change to another size of gauge ring, due possibly to variable conditions influencing his size, he will have in his possession the additional gauging rings enabling him to change his first selection to one more properly fitting his finger. Upon the determination of proper ring size being made as in the foregoing, the buyer completes the order form and sends it to the source from which he obtained the gauging card or strip in the first instance or directly to the ring manufacturer or store selling the rings.

It may sometimes happen that the half size (.016") between ring sizes may be too great for the proper fitting of a ring to a particular finger. In such case, the buyer can readily be supplied with one or more gauging rings made up in one-quarter size increments upon his giving indication that his ring size appears to be between a one-half size and the next full size. Of course, for the more expensive rings, the gauging rings may be initially made up in one-quarter size rather than in half-size increments, such in addition to being of oval shape rather than round or circular shape.

From a consideration of the above description and accompanying drawings, it will be appreciated that ringgauging means of either of the forms according to the invention provides numerous advantages. From the standpoint of the ring manufacturer, the proper use of finger ring size gauging means as herein proposed virtually eliminates expensive resizing of delivered rings, and for the manufacturers representative it substantially reduces the time and labor involved in sizing for group orders, as compared to the time required when using the conventional finger-sizing gauge rings.

For the school or college whose students or classes are to be fitted for school or class rings, the ring-fitting procedure employing the finger ring gauging means of the present invention is of advantage because it may be practiced without disturbing academic schedules, since each student in effect performs his own ring-sizing operation on his own time. In this connection, it is explained that, historically, the taking of large orders for school and class rings necessitated a substantial disruption of academic schedules because of the substantial time required for inlonger necessary by the use of ring-gauging means according to the invention.

From the standpoint of the student buyer, use of the ring-size gauging means as herein provided is of advantage because not only is no substantial amount of his time is required for a ring fitting, but also he may perform same on his own time and when convenient to him. Even more important is the fact that the overall cost of the delivered ring per student is reduced inasmuch as the time and expense of each ring fitting made by the conventional procedure was of necessity reflected in the cost to him of the ring. Again, students of rural schools and persons living in rural areas paid a premium price when buying rings, due to travel time and the cost previously necessary to a proper fitting. Such travel time and costs are virtually eliminated through the use of the ring-gauging means as herein contemplated, since such enables the rural buyer to conduct his own fitting.

As many changes could be made in carrying out the above constructions without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

I claim:

1. Finger ring gauging means enabling a prospective purchaser of a finger ring to determine his or her proper ring size comprising: a planar carrying member and a plurality of gauge rings having ring-body section and overall configuration generally corresponding to that of an actual finger ring and being calibrated in increments of finger ring sizes and each being normally fixedly secured to said carrying member so as to lie in the general plane thereof by a readily frangible connection; said planar carrying member, gauge rings and frangible connections being fashioned complete from a suitable plastic to the form of an integral shape-sustaining, generally planar unit capable of being distributed to and handled as such by a prospective purchaser; and said frangible connections between said gauge rings and said carrying member enabling a selected one of said gauge rings initially considered by said prospective purchaser to represent his or her proper ring size to be readily broken away from said carrying member and, if desired, worn for such period of time as provides confirmation of or the need to revise said selection.

2. Finger ring gauging means according to claim 1, wherein said plurality of gauge rings are included within the area limits of said carrying member.

3. Finger ring gauging means according to claim 2, wherein said carrying member has strip form and said gauge rings extend from one longitudinal edge thereof.

4. Finger ring gauging means according to claim 1, wherein one of said carrying member and said plurality of rings has a ring-size designating numbers inscribed thereon so as to be readily visible.

5. Finger ring gauging means according to claim 1, wherein said gauge rings have round finger-receiving openmgs.

6. Finger ring gauging means according to claim 1, wherein said gauge rings have oval finger-receiving openings.

7. Finger ring gauging means according to claim 1, wherein said gauge rings have axial thickness exceeding that of the material of the carrying member.

8. Finger ring gauging means according to claim 1, wherein the plurality of gauge rings carried by said carrying member are arranged in the order of their sizes.

9. Finger ring gauging means according to claim 1, wherein the gauge rings carried by said carrying member are calibrated in increments of girls and/or womens finger-ring sizes.

10. Finger ring gauging means according to claim 1, wherein the gauge rings carried by said carrying member 7 8 are calibrated in increments of boys and/or mens finger- 1,781,529 11/1930 Shulman 2O656(A ring sizes. 2,350,415 6/1944 Paulsen 33-178(B) 11. Finger ring gauging means according to claim 2, 2,884,150 4/1959 Weichselbaum 20656(A wherein said carrying member has rectangular card form. 3,136,416 6/ 1964 Goldenrosen 20656(A 12. Finger ring gauging means according to claim 11, 5 3,206,017 9/1965 Williams 20656(A wherein each gauge ring is slightly spaced from the carry- OTHER REFERENCES ing member throughout the major arc of its periphery but is connected to said carrying member by areuately spaced webs providing the aforesaid readily frangible connections.

Ring Size Card, copy in group 280, 33/178B.

LEONARD FORMAN, Primary Examiner 10 References Cited DENNIS A. DEARING, Assistant Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS US. Cl, X.R 146,974 2/1874 Allen 33178(B) 206-56 1,212,279 1/1917 Stone 33178(B)

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US146974 *Jul 2, 1873Feb 3, 1874 Improvement in ring-gages for jewelers
US1212279 *Oct 15, 1915Jan 16, 1917Baird North CoBook or catalogue.
US1781529 *Jan 20, 1930Nov 11, 1930Shulman IsidorGame
US2350415 *Feb 16, 1943Jun 6, 1944Northern Tool & Die CoGauge holder
US2884150 *Apr 5, 1956Apr 28, 1959Biolog Res IncHematocrit closures
US3136416 *Nov 22, 1961Jun 9, 1964Dapol Plastics IncPackage for plastic articles
US3206017 *Jan 9, 1962Sep 14, 1965Sweetheart PlasticsCluster of container covers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4203515 *Aug 10, 1978May 20, 1980Henry KahnDental cap package
US6279244 *Mar 29, 1999Aug 28, 2001George Thomas KelleyFancy sizers
US6279245 *Apr 16, 1997Aug 28, 2001Erling JohnsenBall controller for checking the diameter of a golf ball
US7845077 *Oct 25, 2007Dec 7, 2010Alulis Eric BMethod of manufacturing a sizing ring
Classifications
U.S. Classification33/555.2, D10/64, 206/305, 206/303, 206/820
International ClassificationG01B3/34
Cooperative ClassificationA44C9/02, Y10S206/82, A44C27/00, G01B3/34
European ClassificationG01B3/34, A44C27/00, A44C9/02