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Publication numberUS3549027 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 22, 1970
Filing dateFeb 23, 1968
Priority dateFeb 23, 1968
Publication numberUS 3549027 A, US 3549027A, US-A-3549027, US3549027 A, US3549027A
InventorsBatson Dossie M
Original AssigneeNelson Equipment Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Storage and loading apparatus for elongated loads
US 3549027 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventor Dossie M. Batson Portland, Oreg. [211 App]. No. 707,829 [22] Filed Feb. 23, 1968 [45] Patented Dec. 22, 1970 [73] Assignee Nelson Equipment Company Portland, Oreg. a corporation of Oregon [54] STORAGE AND LOADING APPARATUS FOR ELONGATE LOADS 16 Claims, 11 Drawing Figs.

[52] US. 2 14/38, 214/152; 248/296; 254/45 [51] Int." 865g 67/12 [50] Field olSearch 2l4/38.46, 41, 512, 515, (Log Loading Digest); 254/45; 248/145, 285, 296

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,069,236 2/1937 Fitch 254/45 Primary Examiner-Robert G. Sheridan Attorney-Buckhorn, Blore, Klarquist and Sparkman ABSTRACT: A storage and loading bunk assembly for logs and other elongate loose or containerized loads including two pairs of laterally spaced posts adjustable longitudinally along a reach member. Each post is vertically extendible by hydraulic means, and the extendible portion carries a horizontal load support arm which extends inwardly toward the support arm of the opposed post. The arms of each pair interlock to support one end of a load. The support arms can be swung from their inwardly directed positions horizontally to longitudinal positions so as to avoid obstructing a vehicle driven between the vertical support posts. The bunk assembly is wheelmounted for mobility, and can carry hoisting equipment.

' PATENTEU UEE22I97D SHEET 1 OF 4 DOSSIE M. BATSON INVENTOR BUCKHORN, BLORE, KLARQUIST & SPARKMAN ATTORNEYS YPATENTEB 05222 1970 SHEET U 0F 4 DOSSIE M, BATSON INVENTOR BUCKHOR N, BLORE, KLARQUIST 8- SPARKMAN ATTORNEYS 1 STORAGE AND LOADING APPARATUS I on IMlLMQAL LQ IQSm BACKGROUND or THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention I I The present invention relates to apparatus and systems for loading vehicles with logs of other loose or containerized loads of various sizes and shapes.

2. Description of the Prior Art v The traditional system for'loading logs on vehicles for transport from the woods includes the use of -a heavy duty log loader equipped with a grapplewhichloads each vehicle in turn as it arrives at the landing. .Since each vehicle is dependent on the log loader-for loading, considerable time islost during the loading operation whens'everal-trucks are waiting to be loaded. The log loader is also often inactive during intervals when no vehicles are present for loading. Thus the system results in inefficient use of men and equipment, and low quantity of logs delivered to the mill. This is aparticularly serious problem to drivers of log-hauling vehicles :becausemost are paid by the quantity of Iogshauled.

SUMMARY or THE INVENTION I The present invention overcomes the problems of loading vehicles presented by the prior art in providing apparatus which will enable each truck'to become self-loading at the loading site, thereby eliminating the dependence of each vehicle on a log or other loader. Moreover, the apparatus of the present invention eliminates the need for a log loader altogether and enables a bulldozer, rubber-tired skidder, or other tractor-vehicle equipped with dozer blade, front" end loader or grapple to 'preload the loading .apparatus,-after which the apparatus of the invention loads the vehicle. Furthermore, the'apparatus of the invention is capable of loading a vehicle in far less time than was formerly required with a log or other loader. Theappa'ratus is also useful in unloading vehicles-and in transferring loads fromone vehicle to another. For example, an off-highway vehicle might be loaded at a log landing by one set of loading bunks, then driven to the nearest highway'where another set of loading bunks would transfer the load to a high speed, highway vehicle.

By utilizing the loading apparatus of the invention in multipies, all waiting of vehicles atthe. log landing can be eliminated. The apparatus used in multiples also promotes the' most efficient use of the log-loading'or other loading equipment by enablingthe equipment to operate continuously in refilling empty loading bunks, without waiting for the arrival of empty load-hauling vehicles. Y 1

Primary objects of the invention are to provide:

1. a new and improved method'of loading logs and other elongate loads on a vehicle;

2. a method as aforesaid which enables the use of men and equipment more efficiently than heretofore possible;

3. apparatus forstoring and loading logs andother load members on a vehicle; I

4. apparatus asafore'said within which load members can be loaded and stored with grapple," blade or front-end loader-,equipped tractor vehicles rather than log or other heavy-duty loaders;

5. apparatus as aforesaid which can be operated by one man to load or unload a vehicle, or transfer a load from one vehicle to another;

6. apparatus as aforesaidwhich comprises a stationary but portable storage and loading bunk;

7. apparatus as aforesaid including vertically movable load support arms;

8. apparatus as aforesaid wherein the arms can be swung horizontally from 'a load supporting position to a load l0. apparatus as aforesaid capable of handling both long and short loads because of the variable distance between bunks; and

l 1. apparatus as aforesaid capable of use in log sorting yards in conjunction with rubber-tired log sorters or cranes of the fixed swing type to store preso'rted logs and load trucks with such presorted logs upon their arrival at the yard.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The foregoing and other objects and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent from the follow ing detailed description which proceeds FIG. 3 is a rear end view of the apparatus of FIG. 2 in its load-receiving position; v

FIG. 4 is a side view of the apparatus of FIG. 3 with its hoist attachment removed; H

FIG. 5 is a rear end view similar to FIG. 3 but with the apparatus and load in an elevated position and with a log-hauling trailer positioned within the apparatus;

FIG. 6 is a side view of the apparatus of FIG. 5; FIG. 7 is a side view of the apparatus in an unloaded condition and with the loaded vehicle removed therefrom;

clearing position to enable the quick removal of a loaded v DETAILED DESCRIPTION With reference to the drawings, FIG. 1 illustrates a log storage and loading bunk assembly 10 of the invention having trailing rear wheels 12 mounted on a frame'structure which includes a longitudinally extending reach 14 defining at its forward end a hitch 16 for attachment to a log truck 20 so that the bunk assembly can be towed from place to place. The bunk assembly further includes a laterally opposed pair of rear upright support posts 22 and a corresponding pair of front support posts 24. With reference particularly to FIGS. 8, 9 and 10, the rear and front posts are supportedon base cross members 26, 28, respectively. Longitudinal base members 30, 31 are joined to the opposite ends of the rear and front cross members, and both the lateral and longitudinal base members carry ground-penetrating teeth 32 to prevent shifting of the frame while being loaded with wheels 12. in their retracted, raised positions as shown in FIG. 2.Transverse base members 26, 28 carry at their centers a boxlike frame 34 having a longitudinal opening 36 therethrough for receiving the reach 14, whereby the reach ties together the front and rear post assemblies and also permits longitudinal adjustment of the post assemblies along the reach.

Each wheel 12 is mounted within a forked support arm 38 mounted by pins 40, 41 to a wheel mounting bracket 42 carried by longitudinal base member 30. Pin 40 is removable to permit pivoting of the wheel arm 38, and thus the wheel, about pin 41. A hydraulic power cylinder 44 is'pivoted at its upper end to an upright channel member 46 which protects post 22. Cylinder 44 has a rod 48 attached at '49 to wheel arm 38 for extending and retracting the arm when pin 40 is removed.

The pairs of posts 22, 24 are vertically extendible as shown, for example, in FIGS. 4 and 8, and the extendible portions carry horizontal load support arms 52, 53. In their load-sup- .porting positions the support arms extend inwardly toward one another and, terminate at the vertical median plane between the opposed pairs of posts. The outer end of support 'arm 52 has a horizontal recess 54 which receives a projection 56 of support arm 53. Thus when the arms extend inwardly, the interlocking connection resists downward deflection of the cantilevered arms under load.

Each vertically extendible support post comprises a fluidpowered ram of special construction and includes, with reference to FIGS. 8 and 9, a vertically extendible cylindrical outer sleeve 60 which telescopes concentrically over an inner stationary hollow base cylinder 62. Sleeve 60 is closed at its upper end by an end plate 64 which serves as a crosshead to which the upper end of a piston rod 66 is secured. The lower end of piston rod 66 is attached to a piston 68 which is slidable within a fluid tight vertical power cylinder 70 mounted concentrically within stationary base cylinder 62. Fluid cylinder 70 is closed by a cap 72 at its upper end and by an end wall 74 at its lower end. End wall 74 is suitably ported (not shown) for connection to a source of pressure fluid (not shown) on the frame of the bunk assembly. Such source may supply fluid to the wheel cylinders, to the post cylinders and to the hoist cylinders about to be described. From the foregoing it will be apparent that the ram of FIG. 9 is a one-way ram extendible under power and retractable by gravity.

Load arm 52 is welded directly to outer sleeve 60 and in addition is attached to a vertical load-restraining stake member 78, which in turn is connected to sleeve 60 by plates 76. The stakes are of tubular construction and open at their upper ends for receiving removable upper extensions 79 thereof (FIGS. 3, for accommodating high loads. Load support arms 52 and 53 and the opposed upright stakes 78 together define a log storage and loading bunk within which logs can be piled and supported as shown in FIG. 3. The front pair of posts 24 and their support arms, which are of identical construction to their rear counterparts, define a front bunk which together with the rear bunk support the opposite ends of a load of logs or other load members L.

Cross member 26 mounts a pair of short, upright support members 80, one on either side of box member 34, against which the underside of load arms 52, 53 come to rest to lend additional support to such arms in their lowered load-receiving positions, as shown in dashed lines in FIG. 8. Front cross member 28 carries similar upright supports for the same purpose.

From the foregoing described construction of the extendible posts, it will be apparent that the load arms and their supporting outer sleeves 60 can be swung from their transverse positions 90 degrees in either direction to positions wherein the arms extend longitudinally, as shown in FIG. 7. The utility of this feature will become more apparent in the description of the operation of the apparatus hereinafter. However, referring to FIG. 9, a gusset plate 82 extends between the lower end of each support post 22, 24 and its longitudinal base member 30, 31. The gussets are rigidly affixed to their base memberspand to the stationary inner tube 62 of their respective posts. Each outer sleeve 60 has a vertical slot 83 (FIG. 9) at its lower end which permits the sleeve to be lowered over the gusset 82. This slot is so positioned that when gusset 82 extends through the slot the load arm 52 on sleeve 60 will extend inwardly in its load-supporting position. Thus gusset 82 serves a dual function: first, to help rigidify the post structure, and second, to maintain the load support arms in their transverse load-supporting positions when the posts are fully retracted. However, there is no need for this locking action of the gusset after the load arms have been elevated under load because the load itself then maintains the load arms in their transverse positions.

FIG. 11 discloses a modified post construction indicated generally at 22a including an outer guard channel 46a affixed to a transverse base member 26a, and a longitudinal base section 60a which is open at its lower end and closed by a plate 64a at its upper end. The lower end of outer sleeve 60a in its lower limit position abuts a pad 84 which supports the post structure on cross frame member 26a. Outer tube section 60a is extendible from and concentric about an inner stationary tube section 86 which is fixed to pad 84 and which, unlike the inner post section 62 of FIG. 9, also serves as the ram cylinder for the post. Base pad 84 is ported at 88 for connecting the interiorof the base cylinder 86 to a source of pressure fluid (not shown). A piston 90 is slidablycarried within base cylinder 86 and includes piston rings 92, 93 providing a fluid seal between the inner walls of the cylinder and the periphery of the piston.

A hollow piston rod 95 is connected to the piston 90 by a threaded plug 96 inserted within the lower end of the rod and secured in place by a nut 97. The upper end of the hollow rod extends through end plate 640 and is open at its upper end to provide porting at 99 for connecting the interior of the rod to a source of pressure fluid. The upper end piston 100 of the piston rod is of reduced outer diameter and defines a shoulder at 101.for abutment with an annular washer 102, which in turn is in abutment against upper end plate 64a within an inner recess of the latter. Both the inner and outer surfaces of upper end 100 of the piston rod are threaded, the outer surface for receiving a nut 104 to secure the piston rod to upper endplate 64a and the inner surface for receiving a hydraulic fitting (not shown). The upper end of base cylinder 86 is threaded on its inner face to receive a packing gland 106 which retains chevron packing 108 between the gland and the piston rod. A retaining ring 109 retains the packing within the gland.

At the lower end of the piston rod just above piston 90 porting 112, 113, 114 connects the interior of the piston rod with the interior of base cylinder 86. Piston 90 is provided with a lead plate 116 and a follower plate 118. Carried on the lead plate is an annular piston stop 120 for limiting the upward movement of the piston within the base cylinder by abutment with packing gland 106.

Outer sleeve section 60a mounts a load support arm 52a in exactly the same manner as previously described with respect to the embodiment of FIGS. 8 through 10. When it is desired to raise load support arm 52a, pressure fluid is admitted to the base cylinder 86 through lower port 88 and exhausted through rod port 99 so as to force piston 90 and thus piston rod 95 and connected sleeve 60a, upwardly relative to base cylinder 86. Conversely, when it is desired to lower the load arms, pressure fluid is admitted to the interior of the cylinder rod through upper rod port 99 and thence into the interior of the base cylinder 86 through lower piston rod ports 112, 113 and 114 above the piston. Thus the construction of FIG. 11 provides a double acting hydraulic ram as compared to the single acting ram of FIGS. 8 through 10.

Referring now to FIGS. 1 and 2, the bunk assembly may include an auxiliary hoist attachment indicated generally at 121 for unloading a log trailer indicated generally at 122 from the frame 124 of log truck 20. FIG. 1 illustrates the conventional manner in which an empty log trailer is returned to the log loading site in the woods after delivering a load of logs to the mill. The truck 20 includes a cab guard 126 which maintains the reach 128 of the log trailer out of engagement with the cab of the truck. Tire rides 130, 131 on the truck frame engage the trailer wheels 133. The log trailer is conventional, and in addition to having the reach 128 includes a transversely extending load support member, or bunk 134, and a pair of removable at their lower ends. Member 149 is hingedat its midsection at a double pin connection 150. The upper .end of the A frame has a crossframe member 151 joining together the laterally opposed legs. Cross frame member 151 carries a cable winch 152 and a sheave 154 from which a cable .155 extends downwardlyabout afall block 156. Fall block 156 carries a.

load hook 158 for connection to the log trailer 122. Hoist 152, sheave 154 and fall block 156 are rigged in a manner so that rotation of the winch in one direction elevates the fall block and connected hook, whereas counterrotation lowers the block and hook. The lower ends-of rear legs 142 are connected to theforward ends of horizontal connecting tubes 160, the rear ends of which are hinged to gussets 162 on the longitudinal base members 131 at the front end of the loading bunk assembly. I v

A hydraulic cylinder 164 is connected to front channel guard 166 and has a piston rod 168 pivoted at 169 to hoist connector 160 for swinging the connector from the horizontal to a vertical position as shown'in FIG; 1. A second hoist cylinder 170 extends from pivot connection 169 to rear leg 142 of the hoist frame for swinging the frame rearwardly about its pivot connection l72 with hoist frame connector 160. Thus by retracting cylinders164 and 170 the entire hoist frame can be swung back onto the frame of the bunk assembly as shown in-FIG. l, with rear leg 142 assuming a nearly horizontal disposition. A pin 174v at the double'pin connection 150 of leg strut l49is pulled so that the front leg 144 of the hoist frame can be collapsed to a parallel relationship with 'rear leg 142. Theupper end of the hoistframe carries a rearwardly projecting support member 176 which abuts and is fastenedmto reach 14 of the bunk assembly when the hoist frame is collapsed to its traveling position on the bunkframe.

OPERATION Operation of the log storage and loading bunk assembly is described with reference to FIGS. 7 1 through 6. First, with wheels 12 extended andhoist 121 collapsed, log truck carrying its empty trailer 122 in, the conventional manner tows the bunk assembly to a desired loading site, which might be at a log landing or alongside a main road. In the latter case, logs might be shuttled from a log landing situated in rough terrain and accessible only by rough logging roads by heavy duty, rough-terrain vehicles to the bunk assembly alongside a paved road to save wearand tear on the over-highway log-hauling vehicles, and particularly the tires of such vehicles.

Once at the site, the truck is disconnected from the bunk assembly, and the rear wheels 12 of the assembly are raised to lower the studded base frame members 25, 28, 30 into ground engagement. Hoist 121 is erected by extending cylinders 164 and 170, and by extending front frame legs 144 to their vertical positions and pinning leg struts 174 in their extended position. With the hoist set up, truck 20 is backed between the opposed legs' of the hoist so that the trailer 122 can be lifted from the truck frame on hook 158 by cable winch 152 in the high with a load L of logs, chains or cable'l78, 179 are placed around the load to hold it in'place. I I

The posts then extend to elevate load arms 52, 53, and hence the load. The arms must be raised to a level above the height of the trailer and truck bunks 134, 140 so that the trailer, with its stakes 136 removed or pivoted downwardly as they are commonly capable of doing, can be backed between the pairs of posts 22, 24 in the manner shown in FIGS. 5 and 6. With the trailer in position within'the bunk assembly, with trailer bunk 134 just forwardly of rear posts 22 and with truck bunk 140 just forwardly of front posts '24, trailer stakes 136 and truck stakes 138 are reinserted in their respective bunks, in longitudinal alignment with post stakes 78, 78a.

Thereafter, the pairs of posts 22, 24 retract to lower the load arms until the load comes to rest on trailer and truck bunks 134, 140. Continued retraction of the posts lowers the load arms to their dashed line positions of FIG. 5 wherein they clear the truck and trailer bunks. In such positions, the unloaded load arms are swung forwardly or rearwardly 90 degrees as shown in FIG. 7, thereby permitting removal of the loaded truck and trailer forwardly from between posts 22 and The load arms in, their partially raised, unloaded condition, as shown in dashed lines in FIG. 5, are free swinging. Thus, with the truck andtrailer rig loaded and the arms extending transversely, the trailer may be driven from between the posts without first manually swinging the arms out of the way, since the forward motion of the trailer will swing the arms aside.

Following removal of the trailer and-truck, the arms are swung inwardly to their load-receiving positions, whereupon the posts are fully retracted to place the arms in position for receiving another load. 1

As shown in FIG. 6, the distance between posts 22 and 24 is preferably adjusted so that base cross members 26, 28 serve as stops for indicating to the truck operator the correct position of the truck and trailer longitudinally within the bunk as sembly.

From the foregoing it will be apparent that after the bunk assembly has been preloaded, the truck and trailer can be loaded by the truck operator alone. For this purpose, a control console 182 (FIG. 3) is provided from which all hydraulic cylinders and the winch can be operated.

Having illustrated and described what is presently .a preferred embodiment of the invention it should be apparent to those skilled in the art that the same permits of modification manner shown in FIG. 2. With the trailer suspended on the hook, the truck is driven from beneath the hoist so that the trailer can be lowered to the ground. With the trailer hitched to the truck, the rig can be loaded with logs from a preloaded bunk assembly.

Referring to FIGS. 3 and 4, the bunk assembly is preloaded with logs with the two pairs of posts 22, 24 in their lowered positions and with load arms 5 2, 53 extending inwardly and interlocked. Loads can be placed in the bunk assembly with a conventional log loader, a fork-equipped tractor or a bulldour. In the case of a bulldozer, a ramp of dirt or logs would be built up to the level of the lowered load arms using the bulldozer blades so that the bulldozer could subsequently push in arrangement and detail. This embodiment is intended as illustrative of the principles of my invention rather than as a limitation of its scope.

I claim: 1. A method of loading elongate load objects on a wheeled vehicle having longitudinally spacedload-carrying bunk portions, each bunk portion including a transverse load-supporting member and two upright stakes removably mounted at the opposite ends of said transverse member, said method comprising the steps:

piling a plurality of said load objects in parallel relation on two transversely extending load arms positioned near opposite ends of said objects adjacent ground level and between upright ground stakes; with said load objects supported on said load arms and between said stakes, elevating said load arms vertically to a height above the predetermined level of the transverse load-supporting members of a load-hauling vehicle; driving an empty said load-hauling vehicle with its stakes removed beneath said arms and between said ground stakes to a position such that the vehicle s transverse sup-. port members and stakes are offset longitudinally from the load arms; inserting said vehicle stakes in upright positions at the opposite ends of said transverse load support members; a lowering said load arms vertically until said load objects become supported by the transverse support members of said vehicle;

thereafter continuing the lowering of said load arms until they clear the vehicle load support members; and

then swinging said arms horizontally to clear the lateral extremities of said vehicle and permit the driving of said vehicle from between said ground stakes.

2. A method according to claim 1 including providing a plurality of sets of said ground stakes and support arms and positioning said sets at predetermined sites in a logging area, and then harvesting logs and loading said sets as required with those logs harvested nearest each said set, then depositing the load within each said set on a load-carrying vehicle according to the steps set forth in claim 1.

3. A method according to claim 1 including mounting each said assembly of ground stakes and load arms on wheels and towing said assembly while empty from place to place as required for loading at sites where needed.

4. A method of loading elongate load objects onto a wheeled vehicle having a longitudinally extending load-carrying portion, said portion including a transverse load-supporting member, said method comprising the steps:

piling a plurality of said load objects in parallel relation on two transversely extending load arms positioned near opposite ends of said objects adjacent ground level and between pairs of upright load-centering means on said arms;

with said load objects supported on said load arms, elevating said load arms vertically to a height above the predetermined level of said transverse load-supporting member of a load-hauling vehicle;

driving an empty said load-hauling vehicle beneath at least one of said armsto a position such that the vehicle's transverse support member is offset longitudinally from the load arms and centered with respect to said pairs of centering means;

lowering said load arms vertically until said load objects become supported by the transverse support member of said vehicle;

thereafter continuing the lowering of said load arms until they clear the vehicle load support member; and

then swinging said arms horizontally about pivot axes displaced laterally outwardly from the lateral extremities of said vehicle load support member to clear said vehicle and its load by driving said vehicle longitudinally away from said load arms.

5. A storage and loading apparatus for elongate load members comprising:

at least two pairs of upright laterally opposed support posts,

each pair being longitudinally spaced from the other pair; the posts of each pair being laterally spaced from one another;

a horizontal load support arm on each post;

said arm on each post extending in its load-supporting position from its supporting post transversely inwardly toward the opposite post of the pair;

means for moving said arms vertically on their respective posts;

and means mounting each arm for horizontal swinging movement from its said transverse position to a longitudinally directed position;

frame means interconnecting the laterally opposed posts of each pair and the longitudinally spaced pairs of posts;

said frame means including a longitudinally extending reach member and means mounting said posts for longitudinal sliding adjustment along said reach member; and

said frame means including transversely extending frame portions maintaining each pair of said posts in a predetermined laterally spaced relation to one another and including wheel guide means for centering a vehicle laterally with respect to laterally opposed said posts.

6'. Apparatus according to claim including upwardly retractable wheel means at one end of said frame means and motor means for moving said wheel means downwardly to an operable position whereby said apparatus can be towed from place to place.

7. A storage and loading apparatus for elongate load members comprising:

at least two pairs of upright laterally opposed support posts,

each pair being longitudinally spaced from the other pair; the posts of each pair being laterally spaced from one another;

a horizontal load support arm on each post;

said arm on each post extending in its load-supporting position from its supporting post transversely inwardly toward the opposite post of the pair;

means for moving said arms vertically on their respective posts;

means mounting each arm for horizontal swinging movement from its said transverse position to a longitudinally directed position; and

means for locking said load arms in their transverse loadsupporting positions when in their lowermost positions on said posts.

8. Apparatus according to claim 7 including means operable to release said locking means upon the elevation of said load arms.

9. Apparatus according to claim claim 5 including hoist means on said frame operable to unload load-hauling trailers from their associated tractor vehicles.

10. A storage and loading apparatus for elongate load members comprising:

at least two pairs of upright laterally opposed support posts,

each pair being longitudinally spaced from the other pair; the posts of each pair being laterally spaced from one another;

a horizontal load support arm on each post;

said arm on each post extending in its load-supporting position from its supporting post transversely inwardly toward the opposite post of the pair;

means for moving said arms vertically on their respective posts;

means mounting each arm for horizontal swinging movement from its said transverse position to a longitudinally directed position; and

said arms of each of said laterally opposed pairs of posts forming continuations of one another in their transverse positions and including mutually interlocking means at the outer ends thereof which resist vertical deflection of said arms under load.

11. A load storage and loading bunk for storing a load while awaiting a load-transport vehicle and for transferring said load to a load support portion of said vehicle, said bunk comprismg:

a pair of upright fluid-operated rams including upwardly extendible ram portions;

means interconnecting base portions of said rams for positioning said rams in laterally opposed relationship and maintaining a predetermined spacing therebetween greater than the width of said vehicle, said rams thereby defining a first gate enabling the passage of a vehicle therethrough;

a horizontally extending load support arm mounted on said upwardly extendible portion of each said ram;

said load support arms being movable with said extendible ram portions between a lower limit position adjacent ground level and an upper limit position above the level of the load support portion of said vehicle;

said load support arms being mounted for horizontal swinging movement on their respective rams about upright pivot axes between transverse inwardly extending positions for supporting a load and longitudinally extending positions for clearing a load, the spacing between said axes being greater than the width of said vehicle to enable said arms to clear said vehicle;

an upwardly extending load-centering means on each arm;

said centering means being spaced inwardly of the pivot axis of its supporting arm when said arm is in its load-supporting position;

said centering means and arms together defining a second narrow gate in their load-supporting positions, said second gate being positioned inwardly of said first gate;

said second gate being shiftable through simultaneous extension of said rams from said lower limit position for ground level loading of said arms' to'said upper limit position for elevating said load to a level above said vehicle load support portion and for clearing said first gate to permit a vehicle load support to pass through said first gate and beneath said arms;

said second gate being shiftable downwardly from said upper limit position to transfer a load from said arms to a vehicle load support; and

said second gate being expandable to clear a load transferred to said vehicle through outward swinging movement of said arms about their pivot axes.

12. Apparatus according to claim 11 including wheel guide means on said base means, said wheel guide means defining wheel channels for centering a vehicle load support portion between said rams.

13 Apparatus according to claim 11 wherein said arms when extending inwardly toward one another interengage to resist downward deflection under load and to define a continuous load support beam between said rams.

14. Apparatus according to claim 11 wherein each of said centering means extends upwardly from its supporting load arm to at least a level approximating that of the upper terminus of said upwardly extendible ram portion in a manner such that said centering means are adapted to contain loose loads.

ill,

15. Apparatus according to claim 11 wherein said centering means includes an upwardly extensible portion for use in containing high loose loads.

16. A stationary load storage and loading bunk comprising:

a pair of laterally spaced-apart and opposed upright post members;

base means for supporting said post members on a ground surface and for maintaining said posts in their laterally opposed relationship;

a horizontal load support arm on each post member;

load-centering means extending upwardly from each said load support arm for centering a load on said arms laterally with respect to said post members and preventing lateral shifting of said load on said arms;

means for moving said support arm vertically on its connected post member;

means mounting said support armsfor horizontal swinging movement about upright pivot axes positioned laterally outwardly of their associated said centering means from a transverse position wherein said centering means contain a supported load laterally on said arms to a position wherein said arms and their said centering means clear said load; and

said centering means for each arm having a load-engaging surface portion shaped to provide line contact with a load on said arm so that said centering means will clear said load without binding when said arm is swung from its transverse position.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 549 7 Dated December 22 1970 Inventor(s) Dossle Batson It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 3 line 2 "Figs 4' should read Figs S Column 5, line 55, "25" should read 26 Column 8, claim 9, line 55, "claim claim 5" should read claim 5 Signed and sealed this 11th day of May 1971.

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD M.FLETCHER,,JR. WILLIAM E. SCHUYLER Attesting Officer Commissioner of Pat

Referenced by
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US6338523Nov 23, 1999Jan 15, 2002Happijac CompanySliding mechanisms and systems
US6976721Mar 5, 2004Dec 20, 2005Happijac CompanySlide-out mechanisms and systems
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Classifications
U.S. Classification414/399, 414/401, 414/809, 254/45
International ClassificationB60P3/41, B65G67/12, B65G67/02, B60P3/40, B62D53/00, B62D53/04
Cooperative ClassificationB60P3/41
European ClassificationB60P3/41