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Publication numberUS3552471 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 5, 1971
Filing dateJul 7, 1969
Priority dateJul 7, 1969
Publication numberUS 3552471 A, US 3552471A, US-A-3552471, US3552471 A, US3552471A
InventorsHurst Raymond M, Hurst Richard
Original AssigneeHurst Raymond M, Hurst Richard
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Window and screen assembly
US 3552471 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Richard M. Hurst and Raymond M. Hurst, R. D. 3, Lititz, Pa.

845,637 July 7, 1969 Jan. 5, 1971 Continuation of application Ser. No. 669,189, Sept. 20, 1967, now abandoned.

Inventors A p]. No. Filed Patented WINDOW AND SCREEN ASSEMBLY 13 Claims, 7 Drawing Figs.

[51] 1nt.CI E06b 9/08 [50] Field of Search 160/26- [56] References Cited UNlTED STATES PATENTS 1,016,413 2/1912 Jenkins 160/28 1,471,534 10/1923 Smythe 160/28X Primary Examiner-J. Karl Bell Attorney-Donald D. Schaper ABSTRACT: A window having a slidably mounted sash and a stool which is mounted on the window sill and carries a roll of screen. The screen extends through a passage in the stool and is detachably connected to the lower rail of the sash.

{PATENTED JAN 5 I97! SHEET 1 BF 2 INVENTOR RICHARD M. HURST BY RAYMOND M. HURST ATTORNE Y PATENTED JAN 5 I971 I SHEET 2 UF 2 III. I III I III II I! III III. III. Ill

R m N W WH W 0 W WY m ATTORNEY WINDOW AND SCREEN ASSEMBLY This application is a continuation of US. Pat. application I Ser. No. 669,l89,filed Sept. 20, l967,now abandoned.

. BACKGROUND OF THEINVENTION A still further object of this invention is to provide an attachment for windows which can readily be adapted to different size windows.

the elements at all times, they must be pe'riodicallycleaned and maintained. v

In recent years, screen panels substantially half the size of the window have been providedwith commercially available storm windows. Thus, a clear view was possiblethrough a portion of the window. However, the use of double pane. windows has eliminated the need for storm windows.-

The roller-type screen, which remains concealed except when the window is open,overcomes many of the objections to the screens described above. The roller-type screens developed heretofore, however, havefnot received wide acceptance. The main reason for this is the relatively complicated and expensive mounting arrangements used on these screens. in the known prior art devices, extensive modification,

of the window sash or window frame is necessary to install the screen.

It is normal for the builder of today to purchase window frames and sashes fromcompanies specializing in this type of product. The builder then installs the window units in the wall structure of the building, and'the window stool and trim strips are added to complete theinstallation. Because of labor and material costs, the builders cannot perform costly niodifrcations in the purchased window units. .Thus,'roller-type screens which mount on the frame or in the modern building methods.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION This invention is' directed to .a window and screen assembly in which a roller-type screen is mounted in the window stool.

The window stool is formed with a cavity in the interior sash are not practical with thereof, and a mounting cylinder is'rotatably mounted in the cavity. The-screenis coiled onthe mounting cylinder, and

Other objects reside in the novel combination and arrangement of parts and in the details of construction hereinafter illustrated and/or described.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a fragmentary perspective view of a window with the center portion broken out to show the roller screen in the stool and the position the screen assumes when the window is partially raised.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged sectional view, taken on line 2-2 of FIG. I, and showing the end plates which support the stool on the sill. FIG. 3 is a view of the window stooL-as seen from the bottom, and before the stool is mounted on the sill.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged bottom plan view with a portion of the cover plate and screen broken away to show a sectional view ofthe roller structure.

- FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken on the line 5-5 in FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged perspective view of the screen attaching means.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the window stool.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawings by numerals of reference and particularly to FIG. I, numeral 10 designates the lower portion of a double hung window. Window 10 comprises a window frame 12, a lower sash l4, and a window stool I6.

- Window frame 12 comprises vertical frame members 20 I connected together at their upper ends by means of a header,

not shown, and at their lower ends by means of the usual window sill 22. Frame 12 is adapted to be set into an opening in a building and attached to the studding thereof in the usual manner.

Lower sash 14 is slidably mounted'in frame 12 and is carried therein by a pair of channel members 24. As shown in FIG. I,

grooves are provided in the channel members 24 for both the lower sash and upper sash, not shown. Sash 14 comprises a pair of vertical stiles 30, an upper rail, not shown, and a lower springs in the interior of the cylinder serve to maintain the screen in roll form. The screen extendsfrom the cavity through a passage in the rear of the stool and is detachably connected to the lower rail of the sash.

When the window sash is raised, the screen unrolls and closes the open space between the sill and. the lower rail of the sash. When the sash is lowered to close the window, the screen is automatically rolled back on the mounting cylinder, and the screen is hidden from view.

The roller screen unit is completely contained in the window stool. A complete window unit, with exception of the stool, can be installed in a building using standard purchased parts. The stool containing the roller screen unit is mounted on the sill to complete the window installation.

A main object of this invention is to provide a screen for a window of the type described which can be installed on the window without modification of the window frame or window sash.

Another object of this invention is to provide a screen for'a slidably mounted window in which the screen is completely concealed except when the window is open.

A further object of this invention is to provide a screen attachment which is particularly suitable for double pane windows. Y

A further object of this invention is to provide a roller-type screen for a window in which the screen can be easily and quickly installed or removed. Y

rail 32. The various stilesand rails are recessed to receive a window pane 34, preferrably of the double-pane type. Handles 36 are mounted on lower rail 32 to provide a means for manually raising and-lowering the sash. A guide strip 37 and a trim strip 38 are mounted to frame members 20 at each side of the window to conceal the front edges of channel members 24 and enhance the appearance of the window.

Window stool 16, as shown in FIGS. 1-4 and 7 is formed with a flat top surface 40, a rounded front surface 41, and a cavity, or opening, 42 in the interior thereof. With reference to FIG. 3, the end portions 44 of the stool are solid, and flat 'surfaces 48 are provided to abut against the sill 22 when the stool is mounted in the window. End plates 50 are mounted on the ends of stool l6 and horizontal portions 52 on the plates 50 are adapted to rest on the upper surface of sill 22 to support the stool thereon. Stool 16 is held in place in frame 12 by means of screws 54 which extend through tabs 56 on plates 50 and into frame members 20.

A roller screen assembly 60 is mounted in the cavity 42 in stool 16. Screen assembly 60 comprises screen 61 which is adapted to be rolled on a mounting cylinder 64. It has been found extremely advantageous to make the screen 61 from fiberglass because of the flexibility of this material; however, other well known screen materials may be used.

Mounting cylinder 64 is rotatably mounted in cavity 42. One end of the mounting arrangement is shown in FIG. 4. it being understood that the mounting elements are the same for both ends. As cylinder 64 rotates to feed out screen 6i, it winds coil springs 66 fixed to a disc 67 on cylinder 64 and to elements 69 which are fixed against rotation. Elements 69 exbrackets 72. Brackets 72 are fixed to the end walls of cavity 42 by screws or other means. A cover plate 73 (FIG. 2) is rcmovably mounted to the stool to cover cavity 42.

Screen 61 is detachably connected to the lower rail 32 of the sash 14 by means of hooks 75 (See FIG. 6) which are .pivotally mounted in a strip 76 fixed to the free end of screen 61. Hooks 75 are adapted to extend around pins 78 extending from-handles 36. A groove 80 is formed in strip 76 for receiving the hooks 75 when the screen is detached from the windowv It will be apparent from the foregoing description that applicants have disclosed a simple and efficient means for mounting a roller screen in a window. No modification of the window frame or sash is necessary to utilize applicants invention. The screen is readily accessible for replacement or repair, if necessary. Further, the screen is completely concealed when the window is closed, thereby facilitating a clear view through the window. No slots are formed in the frame, and thus, the disclosed invention is free from leakage problems which result when the roller screen is mounted under the sill.

In the operation of applicants invention, the screen 61 closes the open space when sash 14 is raised. Springs 66 exert a constant tension on the screen so that the screen is rolled on cylinder 64 as sash 14 is lowered. ln event the screen is not desired, hooks 75 can be lifted off pins 78, and the screen will be rolled on cylinder 64 by springs 66. If desired, vertical elements, not shown, can be attached to strip 76 adjacent the side edges of screen 61 to prevent the screen end from being pulled back into the stool when it is detached from the window.

While this invention has been described in connection with a particular embodiment thereof, it will be understood that it is capable of modification, and this application is intended to cover any variations, uses, or adaptations following, in general, the principles of the invention and including such departures from the present disclosure as come within known or customary practice in the art to which the invention pertains, and as fall within the scope of the limits of the appended claims.

We claim:

1. A window comprising:

a window frame having a sill, a first vertical frame member at one said sill and a second vertical frame member at an opposite end thereof;

a vertically extending trim strip adjacent each of said vertical frame members;

channel means carried on said frame members to slidably support a window sash;

a sash in said channel means, said sash being adapted to move from a lower closed position to an upper open position, and said sash having a lower rail adapted to contact said sill when the sash is in the closed position;

a window stool mounted above said sill along one side thereof, said stool having an elongated body extending generally in the direction of said sill, said elongated body having a central first portion extending in front of said sash and end portions at opposite ends of said first portion, said end portions extending at least as far as said trim strips, said elongated body having a generally flat top surface which is generally perpendicular to said lower rail. said top surface extending through said first portion and said end portions, said body having a front surface extending downwardly from said top surface along substantially the entire length thereof, said front surface being of generally uniform height along the length of said body;

roller means mounted on said stool for carrying a length of screen and adapted to maintain said screen in roll form; and

a screen fixed to said roller means and to said lower rail, and said screen extending substantially the length of said first portion and between said end portions.

2. A window, as recited in claim 1, wherein said stool has an inner part which extends adjacent said still and an outer part spaced outwardly therefrom, said outer part has an opening in the interior thereof, and said roller means is mounted in said opening.

3. A window, as recited in claim 2, wherein said screen passes through slot means between a top surface of said inner part and said sill, and said rail is opposite said slot means when the sash is in a closed position.

4. A window, as recited in claim 2, wherein said opening cxtends to an underside of the stool, and a plate is rcmovably mounted to said underside to cover said opening.

5. A window, as recited in claim 1, wherein said screen is detachably fixed to said lower rail, and said window sash is provided with a transparent center section of the double-pane type.

6. A window stool which is adapted to be mounted over a window sill having a generally fiat top side, said stool comprismg:

an elongated body having a central first portion and end portions at opposite ends of said first portion, said body having a generally flat top surface extending through said first portion and said end portions, said body having a front surface joining said top surface and extending downwardly therefrom, said front surface extending substantially the entire length of said top surface and said front surface being of substantially uniform height, said body having an undersurface opposite said top surface;

roller mounting means on said stool adjacent said undersurface;

roller means on said mounting means;

a screen fixed to said roller means and adapted to be coiled thereon, said screen extending substantially the length of said first portion and between said end portions;

support means for supporting said stool over said sill; and

said screen being adapted to pass between said sill top side and said top surface when said stool is mounted over said sill.

7. A window stool, as recited in claim 6, wherein said stool has an opening in the interior thereof, and said roller means and the screen fixed thereto is mounted in said opening.

8. A window stool, as recited in claim 7, wherein said roller mounting means comprises a pair of axially spaced brackets mounted at opposite ends of said opening.

9. A window stool, as recited in claim 8, wherein said support means comprises an end plate adjacent each end of said stool, and said end plates are adapted to rest on said sill.

10. A window stool, as recited in claim 6, wherein said screen is formed from glass cloth.

11, A window stool which is adapted to be mounted to a window having a sash slidably mounted between a pair of spaced apart frame members, said stool comprising:

an elongated body having a central first portion and end portions at opposite ends of said first portion, said first portion being ofa length generally equal to said sash and said end portions extending beyond said frame members, said body having a first surface which is generally perpendicular to said sash and which extends through said first portion and said end portions, said body having a front surface joining said first surface and extending at an angle thereto, said front surface extending substantially the entire length of said first surface and said front surface being of substantially uniform width, said body having an opening in said central portion;

roller mounting means at opposite ends of said opening;

roller means on said mounting means; and

a screen fixed to said roller means and adapted to be coiled thereon, said screen extending substantially the length of the sash and said first portion, said screen being adapted to be connected to said sash for movement therewith.

12. A window stool, as recited in claim ll, wherein said end portions are of generally solid construction and said central portion is generally L-shaped in cross section.

13. A window stool, as recited in claim 12, wherein a cover plate is fixed to said end portions and extends over said opening.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1016413 *Jul 5, 1910Feb 6, 1912Charles Kempthorne JenkinsRoller window-screen.
US1471534 *May 15, 1920Oct 23, 1923Smythe Edwin HWindow screen
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6360500Sep 22, 2000Mar 26, 2002Dean E. WilcoxWindow sill cover
US6457287Dec 31, 2001Oct 1, 2002Dean E. WilcoxWindow sill cover
US7703498 *Aug 9, 2005Apr 27, 2010Michael HolevasHidden window screen
DE2934122A1 *Aug 23, 1979Mar 12, 1981Rau Karl KgVorrichtung zum wenigstens teilweisen abdunkeln von gebaeudeoeffnungen.
DE4340621A1 *Nov 29, 1993Jun 1, 1995Perfecta Rolladen GmbhRoller shutter with protective insect screen
Classifications
U.S. Classification160/27, 160/28
International ClassificationE06B9/52, E06B9/54
Cooperative ClassificationE06B9/54
European ClassificationE06B9/54