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Publication numberUS3552478 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 5, 1971
Filing dateSep 9, 1968
Priority dateSep 7, 1967
Also published asDE1758934A1
Publication numberUS 3552478 A, US 3552478A, US-A-3552478, US3552478 A, US3552478A
InventorsLauener Wilhelm Friedrich
Original AssigneeProlizenz Ag
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method for starting and maintaining the supply of metal to a downward operating continuous casting mold
US 3552478 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent inventor Wilhelm Friedrich Lauener Langenhard, Switzerland Appl. No. 758,270

Filed Sept. 9, 1968 Patented Jan. 5, 1971 Assignee Prolizenz A. G.

Chur, Switzerland a corporation of Switzerland Priority Sept. 7, 1967 Switzerland No. 12507/67 METHOD FOR STARTING AND MAINTAINING THE SUPPLY OF METAL TO A DOWNWARD OPERATING CONTINUOUS CASTING MOLD 2 Claims, 1 Drawing Fig.

US. Cl. 164/64, 137/1, l37/142;-164/87,164/2-57 Int. (I B22d 11/10, B22d 11/06 Field ofSearch 164/82, 87,

[5 6] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,299,481 1/1967 Brotzmann 164/281X F ORElGN PATENTS 879,153 6/1953 Germany 164/281 105,587 9/ 1942 Sweden 1 Primary Examiner-J. Spencer Overholser Assistant Examiner-John E. Roethel Attorney-Emest F. Marmorek ABSTRACT: A method for starting and maintaining the supply of metal to a downward operating continuous casting mold has the steps of sucking metal from a reservoir up through a riser into a launder above the reservoir, then closing the riser and keeping closed the downcomer to the mold, thereafter letting the pressure rise in the launder and subsequently opening the downcomer; then letting the metal flow and starting the casting, thereafter rarefying the air pressure in the launder, and then opening the riser'again.

METHOD FOR STARTING AND MAINTAINING THE SUPPLY OF METAL TO A DOWNWARD OPERATING CONTINUOUS CASTING MOLD The present invention relates to a method of starting and maintaining the metal supply to a downward operating continuous casting mold, for instance to a casting machine with caterpillar mold, especially for casting strips of nonferrous metals, chiefly of aluminum and aluminum alloys.

, Several machines have been developed for the continuous casting of strips. in one machine the mold cavity is defined by a cooperating pair of endless chains of articulated mold blocks, and means are provided for revolving each of said chains about its own center. The chainsare mounted so that over a part of theirown length theyengage with each other and define between them a mold cavity having walls which move continuously as the respective chains are revolved together at the same linear speed. Machines of this kind have been named machines with caterpillar mold." In one 'of the said machines the mold blocks of one row are not connected but are moved separately in a guide system and maintained in circuit in such a way that they meet again at the pouring end of the mold cavity to form a closed mold with the blocks of the other row.

In the book Handbuch des .Stranggiessens by E. Herr- According to the invention a siphon is used. The molten metal is sucked from a reservoir into a closed launder disposed above and connected to an air suction device, the outlets through which the melt enters the supply duct or ducts to the mold being closed; one allows more melt to rise in the launder than necessary for forming a molten metal head on the dummy bar of the mold. As soon as there is enough metal in the launder, one interrupts the sucking of melt, lets the pressure rise in the launder, for instance up' to atmospheric (which is the simplest method), and opens the metal-supply ducts. As soon as melt has flowed through the ducts and the molten metal head has been formed in the mold, one starts the lowering of the dummy bar ,and therefore of the casting, the metal sure in the launder. Once the desired rarification has been atmann published in 1958 by the Aluminium-Verlag GmbH in Duesseldorf (Western Germany), the casting in caterpillar molds is described on pages 51 to 63.

When casting downward in caterpillar molds the metal supply presents especially difficult problems as the ducts for the metal supply must project into the closed part of the mold and must be relatively long because of the special path followed by the mold blocks; it follows that the column of molten metal in the supplying ducts must behigh andtherefore it exerts a high metallostatic pressure. It is therefore difficult to obtain the necessary tightness between the supply ducts and the walls of the mold and to prevent leakage of molten metal at the untight spots.

During casting the molten metal,a head must be maintained under the upper end of the closed mold, as otherwise molten metal would infiltrate into the gaps where the mold blocks are nearly in contact one with the other, and would stop and possibly damage the machine. Pouring the molten metal in a free fall into the mold, which should be possible when casting thick sections, does not come practically into question tained, one opens the suction pipe and the siphoning begins. From that time onward the control of the level of the molten metal head in the mold takes place automatically by controlling the level of the metal in the reservoir from which the melt is being siphoned for the supply of the mold.

As a result of the friction of the flowing metal in the siphon, the level of the molten metal in the reservoir is somewhat higher than in the mold; for instance, with a casting speed of 3 meters per minute during operation the level difference may be 30 to 50 mm. However, when starting it is recommendable to choose for safety a greater level difference, of 200 mm. for instance, the said difference being afterwards diminished to about 30 to 50 mm.

1n the accompanying drawing, the single FIG. is a schematic fragmentary vertical sectional view and shows schematically the principle of a device for carrying out the method according to the invention in a machine with a caterpillar mold.

- The siphon comprises a suction pipe .11, a launder 12 and a supply tube 13 (of course, onemay use several supply tubes, with or without slit nozzle). A reservoir 14 for the molten casting metal is provided, and the upper part 15 of a caterpillar mold. Valves 16 and 17 are provided, and a suction socket 18.

When starting the metal supply, one closes the supply tube 13 by means of the valve 17 opens the valve 16 and sucks air out .of the launder 12, by means of a suction device that is connected to the socket 18. The molten metal 19 rises through the pipe 11 into the launder 12 and fills the same up to the level because of splashing and turbulence in the head. One must use with simultaneous measure of the level of the molten metal head in the mold (that is to say, the level at which the molten metal makes contact for the first time with the walls of the mold) is excessively difficult, the difficulties increasing with the decrease of the thickness of the casting; moreover, the level of the molten metal head in the mold and as a consequence the quality of the casting would be subjected to disturbing variations. e

vlt is accordingly among the principal objects of the invention to provide methods and means for such casting that avoid the pitfalls of the prior art. t Further objects and advantages of the invention will be set forth in part in the following specification and in part will be obvious therefrom without being specifically referred to, the same being realized and attained as pointed out inthe claims hereof.

The mentioned difficulties of the prior art are avoided by the method of the present invention, which method enables to maintain constant the level of the molten metal head in the mold. Y

20. Then one shuts the valve 16, lets the air pressure rise in the launder 12 (suitably up to atmospheric pressure) and opens the valve 17. The result is that molten metal flows from the launder 12 through the supply tube 13 into the closed part of the mold 15 and forms a head 22 on the dummy bar 21. The molten metal level in the launder lowers to the height 24 ac cording to the amount of melt fown out. At that moment, without shutting the valve 17, one puts into motion the mold blocks, lowers the dummy bar according to the casting speed, produces again an underpressure in the launder 12 by sucking air through the socket 18 and opens. thereafter the valve 16, thereby putting the siphon 10 into operation. In the launder 12, a rarefied pressure of mm; for instance (760 mm. Hg 110 mm. Hg 650 mm. Hg) may be sufficient. After reaching the underpr'essure necessary to prevent melt from running out of the launder 12 through the suction pipe 11 into the reservoir 14, the valve 16 may be opened immediately, for instance one second thereafter.

By controlling the level 25 of the molten metal in the reservoir 14, the level 23 of the molten metal head in the caterpillar mold is controlled at the same time. It is therefore not necessary to dispose regulating devices in the molten metal head 22.

The metal level 25 inthe reservoir 14, which reservoir may be fed from a melting or a holding furnace, may be controlled for instance by means of a floating valve.

Besides the advantages mentioned in the foregoing description, the method according to the invention offers the further advantage that it is in a great measure independentof the casting speed. One may for instance change considerably the casting speed without changing the flow cross section. The regulation takes place automatically.

The method is especially advantageous with continuous casting in a caterpillar mold. However, it may also be used suitably with other downward continuous casting methods, for instance with the casting between rolls, the strip casting between spaced parallel portions of a pair of flexible metal belts which are moved along with opposite surfaces of the strip being cast (Hazelett), the casting in rotary strip casting machines as well as with the DC casting, and that not only for casting thin plates, but also for casting thick sections, for instance slabs and billets.

Siphonlike tubes used in continuous casting are known; however, in distinguished from the method according to the invention, they necessitate a pressure vessel as molten metal reservoir, which makes the device much more expensive and its operation difiicult; moreover, they do not render possible the automatic control of the level of the molten metal head in the mold during the whole duration of the casting operation. To this must be added that the use of pressure gas in the known devices increases the gas content of the melt, whereas with the method according to the invention a degassing takes place.

I wish it to be understood that I do not desire to be limited to the exact details of construction shown and described, for obvious modifications will occur to a person skilled in the art.

lclaim:

l. A method for starting and maintaining the supply of metal to a downward operating continuous casting mold, provided with a dummy bar, comprising sucking molten metal through a suction pipe from a reservoir into a closed launder disposed above and connected to an air suction device, the outlet means through which the melt enters at least one supply duct to deliver melt to the mold being closed: then interrupting the sucking of melt by closing the suction pipe, thereafter letting the pressure rise in the launder, and then letting molten metal flow through said outlet means and supply duct into the mold; thereafter, as soon as a molten metal head has been formed in the mold, beginning to lower the dummy bar, the metal supply being continued through said supply duct, producing again a rarefied air pressure in the launder, and finally opening again the suction pipe.

2. A method according to claim 1 applied to the casting in caterpillar mold, comprising putting the chains of articulated mold blocks into motion simultaneously with the beginning of the lowering ofthe dummy bar.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3299481 *Jan 17, 1964Jan 24, 1967Hoerder Huettenunion AgContinuous casting of metal melts
*DE879153A Title not available
SE105587A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3718175 *Apr 6, 1970Feb 27, 1973Voest AgPlant for continuous casting without deep casting stream penetration
US3815623 *Nov 4, 1971Jun 11, 1974Farmer Mold & Machine WorksMolten metal delivery system
US4594723 *Mar 5, 1984Jun 10, 1986Asea AbMethod for providing pinch control of a tundish channel-type inductor
US5190674 *Apr 4, 1991Mar 2, 1993Monks James HMethod and apparatus for controlling the flow of molten metals
US5421562 *Apr 28, 1994Jun 6, 1995General Motors CorporationGas-shielded siphonic valve
US5590681 *Jun 28, 1994Jan 7, 1997Frank W. Schaefer, Inc.Valve assembly
US5725043 *Sep 17, 1996Mar 10, 1998Frank W. Schaefer, Inc.Low pressure casting process and apparatus
US5967220 *Mar 25, 1997Oct 19, 1999Larex, A.G.Caster including a gas delivery means to resist backflowing and freezing of molten metal to the tip of a nozzle
US6152159 *Jan 14, 1997Nov 28, 2000Frank W. Schaefer, Inc.Valve assembly and method for use in delivery of molten metal
US6213193 *Nov 8, 1999Apr 10, 2001Larex AgCaster including a gas delivery means to resist backflowing and freezing of molten metal to the tip of a nozzle and an associated method
US7445037Jun 25, 2004Nov 4, 2008Norsk Hydro AsaMethod and equipment for continuous or semicontinuous casting of metal
US8413711Nov 26, 2008Apr 9, 2013Norsk Hydro AsaArrangement related to equipment for continuous or semi-continuous casting of metal
WO2003059554A2 *Jan 9, 2003Jul 24, 2003Rauch Fertigungstechnik Gmbh ICasting device
WO2005000500A1 *Jun 25, 2004Jan 6, 2005Aanesbug Geir OlavMethod and equipment for continuous or semicontinuous casting of metal
WO2009072893A1 *Nov 26, 2008Jun 11, 2009John Olav FagerlieArrangement related to equipment for continuous or semi-continuous casting of metal
Classifications
U.S. Classification164/474, 164/481, 137/1, 164/257, 164/133, 164/483, 137/142
International ClassificationB22D11/06, B22D11/18
Cooperative ClassificationB22D11/18, B22D11/064, B22D11/181
European ClassificationB22D11/18, B22D11/06L1, B22D11/18A
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 13, 1983AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: PROLIZENZ AG, A CORP. OF SWITZERLAND
Owner name: SWISS ALUMINIUM LTD., CH-3965 CHIPPIS, SWITZERLAND
Effective date: 19810921
Jun 13, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: SWISS ALUMINIUM LTD., CH-3965 CHIPPIS, SWITZERLAND
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:PROLIZENZ AG, A CORP. OF SWITZERLAND;REEL/FRAME:004137/0878
Effective date: 19810921