Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3552908 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 5, 1971
Filing dateMar 24, 1969
Priority dateMar 24, 1969
Publication numberUS 3552908 A, US 3552908A, US-A-3552908, US3552908 A, US3552908A
InventorsDrum David L
Original AssigneeDeering Milliken Res Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dimensionally stabilized elastic fabrics
US 3552908 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 3,552,908 DIMENSIONALLY STABILIZED ELASTIC FABRICS David L. Drum, Spartanburg, S.C., assignor to Deering Milliken Research Corporation, Spartanburg, S.C., a corporation of South Carolina No Drawing. Continuation of application Ser. No. 778,821, Nov. 25, 1968. This application Mar. 24, 1969, Ser. No. 809,955

Int. Cl. D06m 9/00 US. Cl. 8-115.6 20 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A process, and the resulting products, for providing dimensionally stabilized elastic fabrics having improved moisture absorbency, anti-static properties, and resistance to soil redeposition upon washing, wherein a treating composition containing a dimensionally stabilizing resin and a polyalkoxy compound is applied to the fabrics, and the fabrics thereafter are treated to simultaneously react the components and cure the resin on the fabrics.

This invention is a continuation of my copending application, Ser. No. 778,821, filed Nov. 25, 1968, now abandoned, and relates to a textile finishing treatment, and more particularly to a process, and the resulting products, for producing dimensionally stable elastic fabrics having improved moisture absorbency, increased anti-static properties, and greater resistance to soil redeposition upon washing.

Textile elastic fabrics composed of blends of elastic and synthetic inelastic yarns are widely employed in foundation and support garments. As the elastic yarn component of the fabrics, there may be employed rubber yarns or the currently popular spandex yarns, while the synthetic inelastic component of the fabrics may be thermoplastic yarns, such as nylons and the like. These fabrics, commonly referred to as powernet fabrics, possess a high modulus of elasticity recovery, and are therefore exceptionally well suited for the fabrication of girdles, bras, bathing suits, and other apparel closely conforming to and firmly supporting the body of the wearer.

To facilitate such fabrication and improve the wear characteristics of garments made of elastic fabrics, the fabrics are quite often treated with a stabilizing resin which is cured on the fabric to dimensionally stabilize and render it highly resistant to shrinkage upon laundering. Such stabilizing resin finishes also assist the elastic recovcry of the garments during wear, improve the Wrinkle and pucker resistance of the garments and, in general, improve the overall fit of the garment on the wearer.

Due to the highly hydrophobic nature of the resins employed to dimensionally stabilize the fabrics, as well as the hydrophobic nature of the synthetic yarns composing the fabrics, resin-treated elastic fabrics possess poor moisture absorbency. This characteristic is quite undesirable in support garments, such as girdles, bras, and the like, which are worn close to the body and are readily contacted by moisture or perspiration from the body of the wearer. Because such fabrics do not absorb this body moisture, the moisture cannot readily evaporate from the body in the area of the garments, making the garments quite hot to wear and causing discomfort to the wearer during use of the garments.

The hydrophobic nature of the resin-treated fabrics further makes garments formed therefrom diflicult to clean during laundering because the attractive tendency of the hydrophobic components to oily dirts and soils causes redeposition of the same in the garments from the "ice wash water during laundering. The surface characteristics of the resin-treated elastic fabrics also make them highly susceptible to static electrical build-up, which further detracts from the desirable wear characteritsics of the garments.

It is therefore an object of this invention 'to provide a process for producing dimensionally stable elastic fabrics which overcomes to a great extent the problems inherent in such fabrics of the prior art.

It is another object of this invention to provide a process for producing dimensionally stable elastic fabrics having improved moisture absorbency to provide improved wearability and comfort in garments manufactured from such fabrics.

It is an additional object to provide a process for producing dimensionally stable elastic fabrics which have greater resistance to soil redeposition upon washing and possesses anti-static properties.

It is a further object to provide dimensionally stable elastic fabrics having improved moisture absorbency, increased anti-static properties, and greater resistance to soil redeposition.

The above, as well as other objects of this invention, are accomplished by applying to powernet fabrics composed of elastic and inelatsic yarn components a treating composition containing a dimensionally stabilizing resin and a polyalkoxy compound, and thereafter treating the fabric to react the components thereon. More specifically, it has been found that a polyfunctional stabilizing resin composed of a thermosetting N-methylol compound containing more than two nitrogen-associated active hydrogen atoms per molecule prior to methylolation, and a polyalkoxy compound having at least one hydroxyl group per molecule may be applied to and simultaneously cured on elastic fabrics to provide dimensionally stabilized fab rics having greatly improved moisture absorbency, antistatic properties and improved resistance to soil redeposition upon washing.

By employing a polyfunctional stabilizing resin of the type described in the treating composition of the present invention, it is found that there are sufiicient reactive groups present in the stabilizing resin molecule to prop erly bond to the fabric substrate and firmly retain the polyalkoxy compound, while still reacting with the other resin molecules to form the proper coating, or film, on the fabric necessary to insure its dimensional stability. As the polyfunctional stabilizing resin, excellent results are obtained by the use of urea-formaldehyde or melamine-formaldehyde resins. If desired, these poly-functional resins may be modified by reactions with other textile resins, such as the mono or difunctional uron, triazone, carbamate, or N-methylol compounds, or other chemicals to provide additional benefits to the stretch fabrics.

As hydroxyl group-containing polyalkoxy compounds, excellent results in improved moisture absorbency have been obtained with the use of polyethoxy compounds and particularly polyethylene glycol compounds having from about 3 to 50 ethoxy units per molecule, with those having from about 5 to 15 ethoxy units per molecule kbeing preferred. It has also been found that the use of monomethoxy-terminated polyethylene glycol compounds produces exceptionally good moisture absorbency in the resin-stabilized elastic fabrics, particularly in those fabrics composed of nylon/Lycra yarn components. Polypropylene glycols are also readily commercially available for use in the present invention.

If desired, the polyalkoxy compounds of the present invention may be substituted or modified by the presence of additional chemical components, when their presence would be beneficial or desirable to the particular end use of the product. Typical of such compounds which may be employed and are commercially available are various polyalkoxylated compounds, such as polyalkoxylated amines, e.g., Tetronic 702 made by Wyandotte Chemical Co., Abbomeen E25 made by Abbott Labs; polyalkoxylated amides, e.g., Lurotex A-25 made by BASF; polyalkoxylated phenols, e.g., Surfonic N-95 made by Jefferson Chem. Co.; polyalkoxylated polyesters, e.g., Permalose TG made by ICI; polyalkoxylated esters, e.g., SL80 made by Sylvan Chem. Co.; polyurethanes containing polyalkoxy groups; polyalkoxylated alcohols, e.g., ethoxylated glycerin and sorbitol; and polyalkoxylated quaternary ammonium compounds. Mixtures of the above compounds may also be employed.

The amount of the stabilizing composition applied to the elastic fabrics may be varied, depending on the degree of dimensional stability, or the particular aesthetics, such as hand, drape, etc., desired in the finished fabric. Generally, excellent results in dimensional stability and moisture absorbency can be obtained when the stabilizing resin is employed in about a 1% to weight ratio, based on the weight of the fabric, with the polyalkoxy compound present on the fabric in from about a l to 1 to a 2 to 1 weight ratio to the resin. Although the above amounts may be varied beyond the ranges indicated with some improvement in moisture absorbency, it has been found that large amounts of resin applied to the fabric tend to make the fabric harsh and boardy, while an appreciable increase in the relative amount of the polyalkoxy compound applied to the fabric tends to reduce dimensional stability of the fabric without appreciably increasing its moisture adsorbency characteristics.

The following examples illustrate a manner in which the present invention may be practiced, and percentages therein are by weight unless otherwise indicated. The examples are in no way intended to limit the scope of the invention, but are presented for purpose of illustration only.

EXAMPLE 1 A sample of an elastic knit fabric composed of 70% nylon and 30% Lycra (Du Pont) was padded to a 70% wet pickup with an aqueous treating composition containing 4% solids melamine-formaldehyde condensate (Aerotex M-3, made by American Cyanamid), 1% ammonium chloride catalyst and 0.25% sodium lauryl sulfonate wetting agent. Four additional samples of the above fabric were padded as above with similar solutions containing varying amounts of a mono methoxy-terminated polyethylene glycol (Carbowax 750, made by Union Carbide Company). All five of the samples were dried at 75 C. and cured at 150 C. for 1 minute.

The moisture absorbency of each of the samples was measured by a standard AATCC Wettability Test 39, (1959), the results being expressed as the time, in seconds, required for a drop of water to disappear from a fabric surface by being absorbed therein. The dimensional stability of each of the fabric samples was determined by measuring the shrinkage of each sample after washing at 140 F. and drying. The results of the test performed on the sample fabrics are indicated in the following table.

Percent Percent shrinkage Carbowax (wash at; 750 (in 140 F.) treatin Wettability (wale x comp. (in seconds) course) Sample:

1 (Control) 0 300+ 2.0 x 4.5 2 4 55 2.1 x 5.2 3 6 20 2.1 x 4.5 4 10 5 3.2 x 6.0 5 5 4.6 x 9.0

To determine the influence of the polyalkoxy-modified resin treatment on anti-static and soil redeposition properties of the fabrics, Samples 1 and 3 above were subjected to electrical resistivity and soil redeposition Electrical resistivity (ohms) Hunter reflectance value sample: B f 111 h 92 2 e ore so ng was 1 (00mm) {glit er song wasi i 58.3. e ore soi' g was 1. 3 108 {After soiling wash 90.3.

From the foregoing results, it can be seen that the stabilized fabric samples containing the polyalkoxy compounds exhibit improved anti-static and soil redeposition properties, as compared to the resin-treated control fabric sample where no polyalkoxy compound was employed.

EXAMPLE 2 Untreated samples of the nylon/Lycra powernet fabric of Example 1 were padded to 70% wet pickups with aqueous treating compositions containing 3% solids melamine-formaldehyde condensate (Aerotex M-3), 0.5% ammonium chloride catalyst, and 5% polyethylene glycol compounds of varying molecular weight. Each of the fabric samples was dried at 60 C. and cured at 150 C. for 30 seconds. The samples were washed at 140 F. and, after drying, tested for Wettability. The results of the Wettability test of the fabric samples treated with the various polyethylene glycol compounds are indicated in the table below. The identifying number of the Carbowax in the table indicates the average molecular weight of the polyethylene glycol compound, and the -50 series are monomethoxy-terminated polyethylene glycols.

Polyethyleneglycol: Wettability (seconds) Control fabric (no carbowax) 'l 300+ Carbowax 200 Carbowax 400 r '70 Carbowax 1000 Carbowax 350 60 Carbowax 550 50 Carbowax 750 40 The results shown above indicate improved moisture absorbency in the resin-polyalkoxy compound treated fabrics, as compared to the control fabric sample which was treated with the resin composition in which the polyalkoxy compound was omitted. As indicated by the Wettability test, the water droplet was not absorbed in the control fabric after more than 300 seconds. Each of the polyalkoxy-resin treated fabrics also exhibited excellent dimensional stability, improved anti-static properties, and improved resistance to soil redeposition.

EXAMPLE 3 Percent shrinkage (wash at Wettabihty (wale x (in seconds) course) Urea-formaldehyde" 300+ 2.4 x 6.5 Urea-formaldehyde+Carbowax 750 20 2.2 x 5.7

EXAMPLE 4 An untreated nylon/Lycra powernet fabric sample of Example 1 was padded to a 70% wet pickup with a treating composition containing 0.8% solids melamineformaldehyde resin (Aerotex M-3, American Cyanamid) 3 monomethoxy-terminated polyethylene glycol (Carbowax 750, Union Carbide Company), 0.5% ammonium chloride catalyst, 0.8% sodium lauryl sulfonate, and 3% solids dimethylolethylene urea (Rhonite Rl, Rohm and Haas). The sample was dried at 60 C., cured for 30 seconds at 150 C., and thereafter washed at 140 F. and tumble dried. The shrinkage and wettability of the sample was measured and the results thereof compared favorably with a control fabric sample (indicated as Sample 2, below) which was treated similarly as above but without the dimethylolethylene urea and with 3% solids melamine-formaldehyde.

Percent shrinkage (wash at 140 F.) wettability (wale x (in seconds) course) Sam le EXAMPLE 5 A sample, A, of nylon/Lycra powernet fabric constructed as in Example 1 was padded to a 70% wet pickup in a solution of 4% urea-formaldehyde resin (Rhonite R2, Rohm and Haas); 1% catalyst XRF, an amine hydrochloride made by Onyx Chem. Co.; and 2% Tetronic 702, (a polyalkoxyethylene diamine compound from Wyandotte Chem. Co.). The fabric was dried and cured at 290 F. for 1 minute.

Another sample, B, of the above fabric was prepared in a similar manner except Carbowax 550 was used instead of the Tetronic 702.

The fabrics were given five 140 F. washes to determine shrinkage. A wicking test was performed on the samples in which the wickability was expressed as the area covered by the spread of a drop of water after 15 seconds contact time.

Percent shrink- Wicking age (Wale x (sq. inches) course) Fabric sample:

A 0.78 3 x 9 B 0.71 2 x 11 EXAMPLE 6 Other samples of the above fabrics, indicated below, received the same treatment substituting other additives for the Carbowax 750 as follows:

The treated fabric samples were given one F. wash and the shrinkage was determined. After a total of five washes the wettability was determined. The table below shows shrinkage and wettability results, where the wettability is expressed as the number of seconds required for the disappearance of the drop.

Percent shrink- Wettabiltiy age (Wale x (seconds) course) Fabric sample:

A 60 2. 4 x 5. 2 75 2. 8 X 4. 1 35 4. 7 x 8. 6 35 2. 6 x 4. 9 300+ 2. 9 x 5. 6

. EXAMPLE 7 A sample, A, of nylon/Lycra powernet fabric constructed as in Example 1 was padded to a 70% wet pickup in a solution of 4% solids melamine-formaldehyde, 0.3% ammonium chloride, 0.25% wetting agent, and 4% Carbowax 550, a methoxypolyethylene glycol. The fabric was dried at 60 C. and cured 1 minute at C.

Another sample, B, of the above fabric received a similar treatment except that instead of Carbowax, 4% of Voranol P-2000, a polypropylene glycol made by Dow Chem. Co., was used. This material was added as an emulsion to the formulation.

Another sample, C, of the above fabric received treatment as above except no polyalkoxy additive was used in the formula.

The following table shows that the surface wettability of both samples with additive is good, with the control being poor.

Wettability (seconds) From the foregoing detailed description of the invention and the examples, it can be seen that the process of the present invention produces dimensionally stable elastic fabrics having improved moisture absorbency and antistatic and soil redeposition characteristics, thereby providing vastly improved wearability and comfort in garments produced from such fabrics.

The foregoing specification has set forth preferred embodiments of the invention and, although specific terms have been employed, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense only and not for purposes of limitation, the scope of the invention being limited only by the extent of the following claims.

That which is claimed is:

1. A process for dimensionally stabilizing elastic fabrics comprising the steps of applying to the fabrics a thermosetting N-methylol compound containing more than two nitrogen-associated active hydrogen atoms per molecule prior to methylolation, and a polyalkoxy compound having at least one hydroxyl group per molecule, and thereafter treating the fabrics to react the components and cure the N-methylol compound on the fabrics.

2. A process as defined in claim 1 wherein the N- methylol compound is selected from the group consisting of urea-formaldehyde and melamine-formaldehyde resins.

3. A process as defined in claim 1 wherein the polyalkoxy compound is a polyethoxy compound.

4. A process as defined in claim 3 wherein the polyethoxy compound is a polyethylene glycol compound having from about 4 to 50 ethoxy units per molecule.

5. A process as defined in claim 4 wherein the polyethylene glycol compound has from about 5 to ethoxy units per molecule.

6. A process as defined in claim 4 wherein the polyethylene glycol compound is a monomethoxy-terminated polyethylene glycol.

7. A process as defined in claim 1 wherein the polyalkoxy compound is a polypropoxy compound.

*8. A process as defined in claim 7 wherein the polypropoxy compound is a polypropylene glycol compound.

9. A process as defined in claim 1 wherein the polyalkoxy compound is selected from the group consisting of polyalkoxylated amines, amides, phenols, polyesters, esters, polyurethanes, alcohols, and quaternary ammonium compounds.

10. A process as defined in claim 1 wherein the N- methylol compound is selected from the group consisting of urea-formaldehyde and melamine-formaldehyde resins, and the polyalkoxy compound is a polyethylene glycol compound.

11. A process as defined in claim 1 wherein the polyalkoxy compound is applied to the fabrics in from about a 1 to 1 to a 2 to 1 weight ratio to the amount N-methylol compound applied thereto.

12. A process as defined in claim 11 wherein the amount of N-methylol compound applied to the fabrics is from about 1% to 5% by weight, based on the weight of the fabric.

13. A process as defined in claim 1 wherein the fabric is a knitted fabric composed of spandex and nylon yarns.

14. A process for dimensionally stabilizing elastic fabrics composed of spandex and inelastic synthetic yarns comprising the steps of impregnating the fabrics with an aqueous composition containing a dimensionally stabilizing resin comprising the reaction product of an N-methyl- 01 compound containing more than two nitrogen-associated active hydrogen atoms per molecule prior to methylolation, and a polyalkoxy compound having at least one hydroxyl group per molecule, and thereafter treating the fabrics to remove excess liquid and cure the resin thereon.

15. A process as defined in claim 14 wherein the di mensionally stabilizing resin is selected from the group consisting of urea-formaldehyde and melamine-formaldehyde resins, and the polyalkoxy compound is a monomethoxy-terminated polyethylene glycol.

16. A dimensionally stabilized elasticfabric having improved moisture absorbency, anti-static properties, and resistance to soil redeposition upon washing having a stabilizing resin coating thereon consisting of the reaction product of a thermosetting N-methylol compound containing more than two nitrogen-associated active hydrogen atoms per molecule prior to methylolation and a polyalkoxy compound having at least one hydroxyl group per molecule.

17. A product as defined in claim 16 wherein the N- methylol compound is selected from the group consisting of urea-formaldehyde and melamine-formaldehyde resins, and wherein the polyalkoxy compound is a polyethylene glycol compound.

18. A product as defined in claim 17 wherein the polyethylene glycol compound is present on the fabric in from about 1 to 1 to a 2 to 1 weight ratio to the resin.

19. A product as defined in claim 18 wherein the resin is present on the fabric in an amount from about 1% to 5% by weight, based on the weight of the fabric.

'20. A product as defined in claim 18 wherein the polyethylene glycol compound is a monomethoxy-terminated polyethylene glycol.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,198,863 8/1965 Lauer 264-184 3,438,842 4/ 1969' Petterson et a1. 161-77 GEORGE F. LESMES, Primary Examiner B. BETTIS, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3871909 *Jun 22, 1972Mar 18, 1975Warnaco IncHosiery finishing process for treating fabrics containing spandex yarn
US4104443 *May 6, 1977Aug 1, 1978J. P. Stevens & Co., Inc.Antistatic finish for textiles material
US8033079 *Mar 31, 2008Oct 11, 2011FloorazzoTile, LLCMethod of manufacturing terrazzo tiles, terrazzo tiles and flooring system assembled with terrazzo tiles
Classifications
U.S. Classification8/115.6, 427/393.1
International ClassificationD06M15/427, D06M15/37, D06M15/423
Cooperative ClassificationD06M15/427, D06M15/423
European ClassificationD06M15/423, D06M15/427