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Publication numberUS3553145 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 5, 1971
Filing dateOct 17, 1966
Priority dateOct 17, 1966
Also published asDE1617081A1
Publication numberUS 3553145 A, US 3553145A, US-A-3553145, US3553145 A, US3553145A
InventorsButke Charles John, Gates Lawrence William
Original AssigneeDrackett Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid drain cleaner
US 3553145 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 3,553,145 LIQUID DRAIN CLEANER Charles John Butke and Lawrence William Gates, Cincinnati, Ohio, assignors to The Drackett Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, a corporation of Delaware No Drawing. Filed Oct. 17, 1966, Ser. No. 586,966 Int. Cl. C09d 9/04; Clld 7/56; C23g /02 US. Cl. 252170 8 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A drain-cleaning composition and method of use, wherein the composition contains a chlorinated hydro carbon solvent, and a special class of surfactants, the composition forming a water-in-oil emulsion on contact With water.

This invention relates to a method of cleaning drain lines and traps. More particularly, it relates to a method and a composition which are safer than those required by solid drain cleansers.

Our development is directed to a drain cleaning process which employs a chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent, a surfactant, an odor masking agent, and a coloring agent. We have discovered unexpectedly that the drain cleaner composition forms a hydrocarbon-in-water emulsion which cleans the side walls of the drain pipe and then breaks up so that the hydrocarbon settles in the drain trap and cleans it.

The use of chlorinated hydrocarbons to clean greasy metal surfaces is well known in the art as illustrated by US. Pat. No. 3,060,125 to Sims. However, such methods depend on the use of stabilized solvent and the careful exclusion of water. On the other hand, the deliberate use of water in combination with a hydrocarbon is not unknown, but the emphasis is either on small amounts of water in 2 phase mixtures (no emulsion), see US. Pat. No. 3,085,918 to Sherliker et al., or on small amounts of water in water-in-oil emulsions, see US. Pat. No. 2,941,952 to Lewis et al. The prior art systems are intended to last, and not to break up.

It is an object of our invention to provide a safe and efficient liquid drain cleaning process. It is a further object of our invention to provide a cleansing composition to be used with this cleaning process.

These and other objects are accomplished by treating the contaminated drain trap and side Walls of the drain pipe with a cleaning composition comprising a chlorinated organic solvent (usually a chlorinated hydrocarbon), a surfactant, a deodorizing agent, and a coloring agent. The composition forms a chlorinated hydrocarbon-in-water emulsion upon contact with water in the drain; this emulsification gives the composition its bactericidal activity in the drain trap throughout the water phase. After about ten minutes the emulsion breaks up so that the chlorinated hydrocarbon settles into the drain trap and cleans it by displacing water and dissolving any contamination lodged there.

The chlorinated organic solvents which can be employed in this process include: carbon tetrachloride, 1,2 dichloroethane, 1,1,1 trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, orthodichorobenzene, 1,2 dichloro propane, 1,1,2 trichloroethane 1,1,2,2 tetrachloroethane, pentachloroethane, and hexachloroethane. This list and any that follow are not meant to be exclusive or to limit the scope of the invention but are merely representative examples.

The surfactant employed are of four general types and will produce emulsification within approximately identical weight-percent concentration ranges, for example, when 1,1,1-trichloroethane is used.

Ethoxylated alkyl phenols (i.e. Igepal CO series) will produce the desired emulsification of 1,1,1 trichloroethane within the range 1.0 to 5.0 percent by weight. The ethoxylated alkyl phenols must contain 60 to percent ethylene oxide in order to be effective.

The complex aliphatic and aromatic phosphate esters (i.e. Alkapents) effectively emulsify 1,1,1 trichloroethane within a range of 0.05 to 5 percent. The phosphate esters are by far the most effective emulsifiers for most of our chlorinated solvents.

The ethoxylated fatty acids and fatty esters (i.e. Tween) emulsify 1,1,1 trichloroethane at percentages of 1 to 5 percent. Again, the ethylene oxide content must be 60 to 90 percent. In this category, the monostearates are more effective than the monolaurates.

The ethoxylated fatty alcohols (Siponics; Brijs) will emulsify 1,1,1 trichloroethane in the 1 to 5 percent range. The ethylene oxide content must be in the 60 percent to 90 percent range with these materials, also. With this classification of surfactants, there is a variation in the effectiveness of the emulsifier dependent upon the alcohol (lauryl, stearyl-cetyl, oleyl) from which the specific surfactant was prepared.

It is apparent that the surfactant must be neither too hydrophobic nor too hydrophilic in order to emulsify the 1,1,1 trichloroethane properly upon addition to water and yet allow the solvent to settle out after approximately 10 minutes. In this respect, the 60 to 90 percent ethylene oxide content is fairly critical. The hydrophobic element of the surfactant also tends to affect the effectiveness of each type of surfactant in addition to the ethylene oxide content and percentage employed. During this work it has also been possible to generally classify the surfactants tested according to an HLB (Hydrophile-Lipophile Balance; described in a publication entitled The Atlas HLB System published by Atlas Chemical Ind., Inc., Chemicals Division, Wilmington, Del.) level. The effective I-ILB range seems to fall between 12 to 16 as determined by the Atlas system.

Blends of surfactants for emulsification of 1,1,1 trichloroethane, must also be considered since, in general, blends tend to work better with regards to emulsification than single surfactant systems. In this respect, the four classifications mentioned previously could possibly be interchanged within or among themselves.

Commercially available odor masking and coloring agents are also employed. Neutroleum Beta or Gamma in a range of from about 0.01 to 2.0 weight percent covers the odor of 1,1,1-trichloroethane; both deodorizers are stable in 1,1,1-trichloroethane.

Nitro Fast Orange 86 in a range of from about 0.00001 to 1.0 weight percent is effective in coloring the cleaning mixture and is stable in it.

In a preferred embodiment of this invention the cleaning mixture comprises from about 95.0 to 99.7 weight percent of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, from about 0.001 to 5.0 weight percent of [Alkapent 6TD] an ethoxylated branched alkyl phosphate ester from about 0.01 to 2.0 weight percent of Neutroleum Gamma, and from about 0.00001 to 1.0 weight percent of Nitro Fast Orange SG. The alkyl group in the Alkapent 6TD surfactant is a C13H q alcohol.

1,1,1-trichloroethane is preferred because it is a very good solvent for animal fats, hydrogenated vegetable oils, cooking oils, and greasethe usual material stopping the flow in household drains. It was also selected because it is relatively non-toxic, non-corrosive, non-flammable, and the vapors are not harmful.

3 Ethoxylated branched alkyl phosphate ester is preferred because of its superior stability in 1,1,1-trichloroethane and its effectiveness as an emulsifier. It also appears to stabilize the 1,1,1-trich10roethane and prevent its hydrol- 4 this invention, there Were both good emulsification and good settling (i.e., within 10-15 minutes). All of the compositions below employed 1,1,1-trichloroethane as the chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent.

EXAMPLE I.ETHOXYLATED ALEYL PHENOL SURFAOTANT ([GEPAL CO SERIES,

NTA RA CHEMICAL) Average percent of ethylene Approximate Relative percent of Extcnt ofoxide in HLB level of Surfactant surfactant surfactant (i1) Surfactant Solvent Emulslfier Settling Igepal CO 530 50 10.0 2. 5 Do 1 50 10. 5.0 Igepal CO 630 63 12. 0 2. D0 1 63 12. 0 5. 0 Igepal CO 710 70 14.0 2. 5

De 70 14. 0 5. 0 Igepal C0 780, 850, 880 70-80 14-15 1-2 d Good. Igepal CO 970, 990 1 90 16-18 2-5 98-95 Very s1ight Too fast.

1 N onylphenoxypoly (ethy1eneoxy)ethanol.

EXAMPLE II.COMPLEX AROMATIC AND ALIPHATIO PHOSPHATE ESTERS (ALKAPENTS, WAYLAND CHEMICAL 00.)

Average percent of ethylene Approximate Relative percent of- Extent of oxide in HLB level of Surfactant surfactant surfactant (i1) Surfactant Solvent Emulsifier Settling Alkapent GTD 1 59 12.0 0.05 99 95 Good Too fast 59 12. 0 5.0 (1 one 59 12. 0 0.10-0.15 Good Antara LE 600, LE 700 60 12. 0 0.05 99. 95 do T00 fast.

70 14.0 5.0 95.0 -do. None. 70 14.0 O.100.5 99.90-99.95 do Good.

1 Complex organic (aliphatic) phosphate ester in free acid form.

EXAMPLE III.--ETHOXYLATED FATTY ACIDS AND FATTY ESTERS (TWEEN, ATLAS CHEMICAL CO.)

Average percent of ethylene Approximate Relative percent of- Extent ofoxide in HLB level of Surfactant surfactant surfactant (i=1) Surfactant Solvent Emulsifier Settling Fatty Acids:

Tween 2O 84 16. 7 2. 5 Tween 84 16. 7 5. 0 Tween 60- 75 14. 9 2. 5 Tween 60 75 14. 9 5.0 Myrj -55 11 2. 5 Fatty esters:

Atlas G-1471 80 16 2.5 o 80 16 5.0 Atlas G-1799. 12 2.5 o. 60 12 5.0

1 Polyoxyethylene sorbitan monolaurate. 2 lolyoxyethylene sorbitan monostearatc.

EXAMPLE IV.ETHOXYLATED FATTY ALCOHOLS (BRIJS, ATLAS CHEMI CAL CO.)

Average percent of ethylene Approximate Relative percent of- Extent ofoxide in HLB level of surfactant surfactant (i1) Surfactant Solvent Emulsifier Settling Surfactant:

Brij 52 25 5. 3 1. 5 98.5 None Brij 52 25 5. 3 5. 0 99. 0 d0 Brij 76 2 60 12- 4 5.0 95. 0 Good Good.

1 Polyoxycthylene(2)cetyl ether. 2 Polyoxyethylcne (10) stearyl other.

ysis by water to form hydrochloric acid and other corrosrves.

Neutroleum Gamma and Beta are deodorizers which we found to have stability in the cleansing mixture. Similarly, Nitro Fast Orange SG is a coloring agent found to be stable in the cleaning mixture.

The following examples illustrate the present invention. In each case a measured volume of cleaning composition was added to twice its volume of tap water (approximately 150 p.p.m. hardness as calcium carbonate) at 75 F. The extent of emulsification and settling (emul= sion bre k) was n ted. In. the preferr d mbodimen s of In the above examples it should be noted that the HLB system has a deviation of :1 HLB unit and the ethylene oxide content is an average figure computed from average molecular weights. Therefore, there is the possibility that some types of surfactants or specialty wetting agents could perform satisfactorily in the chlorinated hydrocarbons of the invention and still be outside the HLB limits of 12-16 and ethylene oxide content limits of 60-90 percent. In view of this, the above examples are not intended to limit the scope of the present invention.

While there has been disclosed that which at present is considered to be the preferred embodiment of the in vention, it will be understood that changes, modifications, and substitutions may be made therein without departing from the true scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

Having thus described our invention, what we claim and desire to protect by Letters Patent is:

1. A liquid draining cleaning composition consisting essentially of at least 95% by weight of a chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent selected from the group consisting of carbon tetrachloride 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, orthodichlorobenzene, 1,2-dichloropropane, 1,1,2-trichloroethane. 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, pentaehloroethane, and hexachloroethane and from about 0.001 to 5.0% by weight of a surfactant having an average ethylene oxide content of from 60 to 90% by weight said surfactant being a member selected from the group consisting of ethoxylated alkyl phenols wherein the alkyl group contains from 1-10 carbon atoms; aliphatic and aromatic ethoxylated phosphate esters; ethoxylated fatty acids and fatty esters; and ethoxylated fatty alcohols.

2. The composition of claim 1 wherein the solvent is 1,1,1 trichloroethane.

3. The composition of claim 1 wherein the surfactant is an ethoxylated alkyl phenol wherein the alkyl group contains from 1-10 carbon atoms.

4. A liquid draining cleaning composition consisting essentially of from about 95 to 99.8% by weight of a chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent selected from the group consisting of carbon tetrachloride 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, orthodichlorobenzene, 1,2 dichloropropane 1,2-tri chloroethane, 1,1,2,2 tetrachloroethane, pentachloroethane, and hexachloroethane, from about 0.001 to 5.0% by Weight of a surfactant having an average ethylene oxide content of from 60 to 90% by weight, said surfactant being a member selected from the group consisting of ethoxylated alkyl phenols wherein the alkyl group contains from 1-10 carbon atoms, aliphatic and aromatic ethoxylated phosphate esters; ethoxylated fatty acids and fatty esters; and ethoxylated fatty alcohols.

5. The composition of claim 4 wherein the solvent is 1,1,1 trichloroethane.

6. The composition of claim 4 wherein the surfactant is an ethoxylated alkyl phenol wherein the alkyl group contains from 1-10 carbon atoms.

7. A double-action process for cleaning drains comprising treating the contaminated drain trap and pipe surfaces with a composition consisting essentially of at least 95 by weight of a chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent selected from the group consisting of carbon tetrachloride, 1,2 dichloroethane, 1,1,1 trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, orthodichlorobenzene, 1,2- dichloropropane, 1,1,2 trichloroethane, 1,1,2,2 tetrachloroethane, pentachloroethane, and hexachloroethane and from about 0.001 to 5.0% by weight of a surfactant having an average ethylene oxide content of from to by weight, said surfactant being a member selected from the group consisting of ethoxylated alkyl phenols wherein the alkyl group contains from l-10 carbon atoms, aliphatic and aromatic ethoxylated phosphate esters; ethoxylated fatty acids and fatty esters; and ethoxylated fatty alcohols, which composition forms an emulsion upon contact with Water in the drain, said emulsion cleaning the exposed drain walls, and which emulsion then breaks up so that the cleaning composition settles in the drain trap to clean it.

8. A double-action process for cleaning drains comprising forming a composition consisting essentially of at least by weight of a chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent selected from the group consisting of carbon tetrachloride, 1,2 dichloroethane, 1,1,1 trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, orthodichlorobenzene, 1,2-dichloropropane, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, 1,1,2,2- tetrachloroethane, pentachloroethane, and hexachloroethane and from about 0.001 to 5.0% by weight of a surfactant having an average ethylene oxide content of from 60 to 90% by weight said surfactant being a member selected from the group consisting of ethoxylated alkyl phenols wherein the alkyl group contains from 1-10 carbon atoms aliphatic and aromatic ethoxylated phosphate esters; ethoxylated fatty acids and fatty esters; and ethoxylated fatty alcohols, adding said composition to the water located in the drain thereby causing said composition to emulsify and clean the exposed drain walls, and allowing said composition to remain in the drain for not less than 15 minutes in order for the emulsion to break and to clean the drain trap.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,819,585 8/1931 Zuckermandel 260-652.5 2,356,254 8/1944 Lehmann Jr. et a1. 13440 2,509,197 5/1950 Borus et al. 252-470 2,748,084 5/1956 DeLeW et al. 13440 3,167,514 1/1965 Baker 252 3,360,472 12/1967 Renold 252170 LEON D. ROSDOL, Primary Examiner W. E. SCHULZ, Assistant Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3925231 *Feb 19, 1975Dec 9, 1975Grace W R & CoWater dispersable chlorinated solvent and method
US4453983 *May 3, 1982Jun 12, 1984Hysan CorporationDiphase drain cleaner
US4498933 *Mar 15, 1984Feb 12, 1985Hysan CorporationDiphase drain cleaner with halogenated aliphatic solvent
US4561993 *Mar 16, 1984Dec 31, 1985The Clorox CompanyThixotropic acid-abrasive cleaner
US5827809 *Oct 15, 1996Oct 27, 1998Vulcan Materials CompanyLow-residue macroemulsion cleaner with perchloroethylene
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/22.14, 510/412, 134/40, 510/195, 510/437, 252/364, 510/413, 510/467
International ClassificationC11D3/43, C23G5/00, C11D1/78, C23G5/028, C11D1/74, C11D1/72
Cooperative ClassificationC11D1/74, C11D1/72, C11D1/78, C23G5/02806, C11D3/43
European ClassificationC23G5/028C, C11D3/43