Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3553472 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 5, 1971
Filing dateNov 13, 1967
Priority dateNov 13, 1967
Publication numberUS 3553472 A, US 3553472A, US-A-3553472, US3553472 A, US3553472A
InventorsJohn S Arlandson, George J Selin
Original AssigneeGeorge J Selin, John S Arlandson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Engine starting system
US 3553472 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Inventors John S. Arlandson 10417 Thomas Ave. South, Bloomington, Minn. 55431; George J. Selin, 2757 Webster Ave., Saint Louis Park, Minn. 55416 Appl. No. 682,407

Filed Nov. 13, 1967 Patented Jan. 5, 1971 ENGINE STARTING SYSTEM 10 Claims, 3 Drawing Figs.

F02n 11/08 Field of Search 290/37,

uzumu. on aenmou max SAFETY SWITCH SWITCH START) [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,053,989 9/1962 Poole et al 290/37 3,054,904 9/1962 Fuciarelli 290/37 3,163,770 12/1964 Smedley 290/38 3,357,417 12/1967 Baumann 290/38X Primary ExaminerOris L. Rader Assistant Examiner-W. E. Duncanson, Jr. AttorneyCharles A. Johnson ABSTRACT: An engine starting system for starting internal combustion engines from a remote point is described. One system utilizes a control unit connected by a cable of electrical conductors to a power transfer unit located in the vicinity of the engine to be controlled. An alternative system illustrated includes a radio controlled system for controlling the power transfer unit. The remote control unit includes signal lights for visually indicating the operating condition of the engine being controlled.

DISTRIBUTOR ENGINE STARTING SYSTEM BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates generally to the art of systems for starting internal combustion engines. More particularly, it relates to a manually operable system where the operator can manipulate a control unit at some remote point and thereby effect the starting of the controlled engine.

2. State of the Prior Art Many systems have heretofore been proposed for automatically or remotely starting internal combustion engines. The apparatus involved, however, have normally presented numerous disadvantages including unreliability, cumbersome size, expensive components, and needless complexity for the average user. Some of these automatic prior art systems have included systems wherein clocks are set to automatically time the interval of starting. Others have utilized temperature sensors to automatically start the engine when some sensed point has reached a predetermined temperature. Various complex combinations were also included along with some of these elaborate sensors to automatically time the duration of the starting operation to assure that the battery would not become unduly discharged, should the engine fail to start within a predetermined number of trys or within a set period. In addition to unreliability, such systems are characterized by being excessively difficult to install and be made operable with the engine to be controlled. All of the mentioned prior art systems presume that the starting operation mustbe continuously monitored and must be automatic, that is, should not require any operator intervention. This of course need not be the case, and for many applications it is sufficient and desirable that the operator be able to start an engine from a remote point. Such mechanisms are particularly advantageous in northern regions, especially in the winter time, inasmuch as they permit an engine to be started prior to the time that the vehicle is to be used, thereby making it possible for the engine to reach operating temperature prior to actual use of the vehicle. Such a remote control unit also makes it possible for vehicle heating and defrosting apparatus to be set in operation prior to the time the vehicle is to be used, thereby eliminating the necessity of the vehicle user having to scrape the windshield and windows, and permitting the passenger compartment of the vehicle to be heated prior to the time the user and passengers enter the vehicle.

As used herein, the term remote refers to some point outside of the vehicle in which the engine to be controlled is located; and the term remote control" refers to control over the operation of an engine from a remote point.

SUMMARY Briefly, this invention comprises 'a system for remotely starting an engine that has an electric starter motor, a starter a starter motor drive operative to crank the engine, a starter relay for actuating the starter motor, a coil, a distributor, and a battery having one tenninal coupled to the ground. A power transfer unit is associated with the electrical system of the engine, and provides a first switching device for selectively actuating the choke, a second switching device for selectively actuating the starter relay to thereby cause the engine to be cranked, and a third switching device for at least momentarily latching the second switching device in the operative position. The invention further includes a remote control unit having circuitry for remotely controlling the operation of the first, second, and third switching devices, and having circuitry for providing a visual indication of the state of operation of the power transfer unit and the engine being controlled. In one arrangement, an electrical cable is utilized to couple an operator's switch to the first switching device for completing an energizing circuit when the switch is activated, thereby causing the choke to be actuated; and to couple a second operator's switch to the second switching device for completing the energizing circuit to thereby cause the engine to be cranked.

In another arrangement, a radio transmission path is utilized to carry a first control frequency from a remote point to control the actuation of the choke, and to carry a second frequency signal from the remote point to control the actuation of the starting circuit.

A primary object, then, is to provide a system for remotely controlling the starting of an engine. Another object is to provide a simple and inexpensive system for controlling the starting circuitry of an engine. Yet another object is to provide a remote starting system that is cable connected to a remote control unit, where the remote control unit includes indicators for advising the operator of the state of operation of the engine. Still another object is to provide a radio controlled remote control unit for controlling the electrical starting system of an engine. These and other objects will become apparent from a detailed consideration of the description and drawing of the embodiments of this invention, and it will be seen that the invention provides a substantial improvement over the remote and automatic starting systems of the prior art, while being substantially more economical and easier to operate than the prior art systems.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a schematic circuit diagram of one embodiment of this invention, wherein a portion of the electrical system of an engine to be controlled is also illustrated schematically, this DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Embodiment I FIG. 1 is a schematic circuit diagram of one embodiment of this invention, wherein a portion of the electrical system of an automobile is also illustrated schematically.

In a characteristic vehicle, such as an automobile, there is a starter motor 10 for cranking the engine (not shown) when activated. Power for turning motor 10 is provided by a storage battery 12. The starter has one terminal 14 coupled to the negative terminal 16 of battery 12. A second terminal 18 of starter motor 10 is coupled to the wiper of normally open contact CRS-A of starter relay CRS, which in turn has one terminal 20 coupled to the negative terminal 16 of battery 12. A conductor 24 couples the terminal 22 to the contact of CRS-A, thereby providing the battery voltage to starter motor 10 when relay CRS is activated, so that CRS-A is caused to be closed. A second terminal 26 of CR8 is coupled to one terminal 28, of the safety switch SS, normally found on vehicles having automatic transmissions. The other terminal 30 is coupled to the ignition (START) switch (not shown). For vehicles not having the automatic transmissions, this coupling would be direct to the ignition (START) switch. Safety switch SS is normally closed when the automatic transmission (not shown) is in the Neutral or Park positions. All other drive positions open safety switch SS, thereby opening the start circuit and preventing the engine from being started. The ignition switch 32 is coupled to positive terminal 22 via wire 33. For normal starting, ignition (START) switch completes the circuit from battery 12, through starter coil CR8 and safety switch SS to ground 34, thereby activating the starter coil and energizing starter 10. Power is also directed through ignition switch 32 to the primary 36 of the coil, via conductor 38. When the engine starts, ignition (START) is opened releasing CR8, and ignition switch 32 is left closed. The secondary 40 is coupled to the distributor '42, whereby voltage pulses are distributed to the sparkplugs (not shown). These features, or their equivalants arewellknown, and it is remotely operating these components that the subject invention is directed.

The remote control unit (RCU) is shown enclosed in 'dashed block 50. TheRCU is a control device that can be located remotely from the engine to be controlled. It includes a transistor Q1, for instance an H71 available from-Honeywell, having a base electrode coupled to conductor 52, a collector electrodecoupled to conductor 54 and an emitter electrode coupled to conductor '56. Bias resistor R1, which can be 47 ohms,.has one terminalcoupled to conductor'52 and a second terminal .coupled to conductor 56, thereby providing bias across the base-emitter junction. Conductor 56 is also coupled to one contact 58 of pushbutton switch SW4. A second terminal 60 is coupled to terminal 62 of pushbutton switch SW-l. A second terminal 64 of SW--1 is coupled to conductor 66. The collector conductor 54 is coupled to one side of lamp 'R, with the other side of lampR being coupled via conductor :68 to wiper terminal 70 of SW-l. Terminal'70 is also'coupled to conductor 72. Wiper contact 74 of SW-2 is coupled .to junction point76 of resistorRZ, which can be 47 ohms, and lamp G. The junction 78 at the other sides of resistor R2 and lamp G is coupled to conductor 80. The five conductorsf56, 52, 80, 72 and 66, reading from top to bottom, are formed into cable 82. Cable 82 is of the length desired to reach from the location of the RCU to theplace where the engine being. controlled is normally stored. Cable 82 is coupled to one-half of connector 84.

The Power Transfer Unit (PTU), shown enclosed in dashed block 90, has cable 92 coupled to a mating half of connector 84. The lines which comprise cable 82 are carried over into cable 92 with the following numerical designations reading from top to bottom, 56,52', 80', 72', and 66'.

The PTU includes three relays, CR1, CR2, and CR3, along with their associated contacts. Relay CR1 is the starting control relay, and has one terminal coupled to wire 66, andthe other terminal coupled to the normally open contact CR1-A. Relay CR2 is also used during the starting operation and has one terminal coupled to junction 94, which in turn is coupled to wires 72 and 72". Wire 72" is coupled in common to the negative terminal 16 of Battery 12, and also to ground 34. The other terminal of relay CR2 is coupled to the normally open contact of CR2-A and via wire 96 to the wiper contact of switch CR1-A. The normally open contact of CR1-B is coupled via wire 98 to junction point on the ignition (START) switch side of safety switch SS. The normally closed contact of CR1-B is coupled via wire 100 to the heater blower 102, with the other terminal of the blower coupled to ground. The wiper of CR1-B is coupled via wire 104 to one of the normally open contacts of CR2-B. The other of the normally open contacts of CR2-B is coupled via wire 106 to junction 108. The wiper terminal of CR2-B is coupled via wire 110 to terminal 36 on the coil. The wiper of CR2-A is coupled wire 80', and normally closedcontact of CR2-A is coupled via wire 112 to one side of relay coil CR3. The other terminal of relay coil CR3, which is utilized to pump the carburetor and to set the automatic choke, is coupled via wire 114 to the normally open contact of CR1-A, and via wire 116 to junction 118. Fuse F2 is coupled between junctions 108 and 118 and fuse F1 is coupled at one side of junction 108 and at the other sideto wire 120 which in turn is coupled to the positive terminal 22 of Battery 12. The wiper of CR3-.A is coupled to junction 108, and its normally open contact is coupled via wire 122 to the pumping solenoid 124. This pumping solenoid has its plunger 126 coupled via cable 128 tothe actuator arm of the carburetor pump (not shown). When the solenoid 124 is activated, the plunger is retracted, and the carburetor is pumped and the automatic choke is set. Finally wire 52 is coupled to the capacitor C1 which can be l0 microfarad, and which inturn is coupled to resistor R3. The other terminal of resistor R3, which can be 250 ohms for this embodiment, is coupled via wire 132 to terminal 40 of the coil.

I Operation of Embodiment I having described the physical connections for the Embodiment 1, the following will explain the mode of operation for that'Embodiment. In order toinitiate the operation, switch SW-2 is depressed, thereby completing the circuit to ground,

so that the voltage derived from v Battery 12 is passed on .wire 120 to junction 118, through, CR3, andthrough CR2-A to wire '80, through connector 84onto wire and resistor R2,

' throughswitch SW-Z contact 60 to switch SW-l, and then to ground through wires 72 and 72" B.y, activating this circuit, CR3 is energized, and normally-Iojaen contact CR3-A is Csistor R2 is in shunt with lamp G, the lamp will be caused to blink on each time switch SW-Z is depressed. The blinking of this I light will indicate that the battery voltage has been switched, and is available for pulling solenoid 124.

Once the choke has beenv actuated as set forth above, the actual starting operation can be initiated by depressing switch SW-l. The first result of depressing SW-l is that the ground connection is made s o that CR1 isenergized. This operation can be seen by tracing the circuit from point 118, where the battery voltage is available, over wire 114, through CR1, over wires 66' and 66, through SW1, and over wires 72'and 72' to ground. By energizing CR1, contacts CR1-A and CR1-B are activated. The actuation of CR 1-A causes latching relay CR2 to be energized byproviding the battery voltage on line 96,

through relay CR2, and then to ground. This also actuated CR1--B, therebymaking the circuit over wire 98 to junction 30. Due tof'the fact that latching relay CR2 is energized, its 1 The battery voltage at CR2-B is also applied to coil terminal 36 via conductor 110. The energization of CR2 causes CR2-A to be switched, thereby latching CR2. The latching is accomplished by the battery voltage available at point 56 being carried through SW-2 to junction 76, through R2 onto cable 80, through connector 84 to conductor 80, through the CR2-A contact to CR2 and then to ground.

When the engine starts running, the rapid opening and closing of the distributor points pulses signals on conductor 132, where the pulses are applied to resistor R3 and then to capacitor C1. The resultant signals are directed over conductors 52' and 52 to the base terminal of transistor Q1.

These signals are such that transistor 01 will alternately be turned on and off, thereby lowering and raising the voltage" drop across Q1. By definition on indicates that Q1 is conducting substantially and off indicates that O1 is not conducting substantially. Leakage currents are ignored for this application. When O1 is in the on condition, the voltage drop across the emitter and collector approaches zero, hence the battery voltage is essentially applied to lamp R. This voltage causes lamp R to light. When the transistor is switched off, the voltage drop across 01 is large, and there is insufficient voltage to turn lamp R on. As a result of this operation, lamp R will be caused to blink rapidly or will appear to be lit continuously with a little flicker when the engine is running, thereby indicating to the operator that switch SW-1 can be released. An intermittent blinking'will be observed if the engine is not running smoothly and is in a rough idle. Once the engine has started, and SW-l is released, CR1 is deenergized, thereby deactivating CR1-A and CR1-B. Since CR2 is still energized because of its latching action, CR2-B is still activated and the battery voltage is applied through CR1-B to conductor to activate the heater blower. The voltage drop across R2 operates the G lamp, thereby indicating that the starting circuit is active. Should the engine stop running, the R lamp will stop blinking, but the G lamp will remain lit to serve as a warning to the operator to restart the engine or to shut off the control circuit.

To shut off the Remote Control Unitand deactivate the Power Transfer Unit, it is necessary only to again depress switch SW-2. This will break the circuit that latches CR2, and all of the relays inthe PTU will be returned to their initial conditions.

Embodiment 11 FIG. 2 illustrates in block diagram form the alternative arrangement that can be utilized to control the Power Transfer Unit 90. Instead of the cable connection at connector 84 in FIG. 1, a radio transmission link is utilized. The Remote Control Unit 50 of P16. 1, is replaced with the Radio Remote Control Unit 50', referred to as RRCU. The RRCU includes a pair of control switches and a pair of tone oscillators that will be described in more detail below when considering'FlG. 3. For this embodiment a Power Unit Radio Control 140 (PURC) must be mounted in the vehicle, in addition to the Power Transfer Unit. The operation of the PTU is the same as that described above for Embodiment 1. It can be seen that Embodiment ll eliminates the need for the cable connection to the vehicle, thereby giving more freedom of location of the vehicle, but does require the additional. circuitry.

Turning now to a consideration of FIG. 3, which is a schematic diagram of that portion of the invention that differs from that illustrated and described in conjunction with FIG. 1, it can be seen that the connections to the Power Transfer Unit 90 are by the five conductors 56, 52, 80',72', and 66', which were described above. The Power Unit Radio Control (PURC) is shown enclosed in dashed block 140, and the Radio Remote Control Unit (RRCU) is shown enclosed in dashed block 50.

Considering the RRCU first, it can be seen that it is simply comprised of a Remote Transceiver, shown enclosed in dashed block 142. This type of transceiver is readily available commercially, and includes a transmitter portion 144 and a receiver portion 146.

The transmitter portion 144 is coupled to antennae 148 for transmitting signals to an associated transceiver (to be described below). The receiver portion 146 also utilizes the I antennae 148 for receiving signals transmitted by some other transceiver. Receiver portion 146 is coupled via conductor 150 to RUN light 152, which in turn is coupled to ground. The control signals are generated by Oscillator 1, labeled 154, Oscillator 2, labeled 156. Oscillator 1 will provide a flow of pulses at a first frequency when activated by pushbutton 158 being depressed, and Oscillator 2 will provide a flow of pulses of a second frequency when activated by pushbutton 160 being depressed. The signals from Oscillator l are directed over conductor 162 to the transmitter portion 144, and represent the control to prime thecarburetor, or to stop the operation of the circuit. The signals from Oscillator 2 are directed to the transmitter portion 144 over conductors 164, and represent control function to start the engine of the vehicle that is being controlled. These Oscillators are of a type readily available commercially, as are the pushbutton switches, and will not be illustrated in detail.

Mounted near the engine that is to be controlled, is a second transceiver, referred to as the Vehicle Transceiver, and shown enclosed in dashed block 170. The Vehicle Transceiver like the Remote Transceivers 142, is comprised of a transmitter portion 172 and a receiver portion 174. The receiver portion 174 includes circuitry of types readily available commercially, for differentiating between the first and second frequencies provided by Oscillators 1 and 2, and for providing a positive voltage on line 176 when pushbutton 158 activates Oscillator l, and for providing a positive voltage on line 178 when pushbutton 160 activates Oscillator 2. The positive voltage provided on line 176 is directed to Amplifier 180. The output of Amplifier 180 is coupled via conductor 182 to one terminal of relay coil CR4. The other terminal of CR4 is coupled via conductor 72" to ground in the PTU. The operation of CR4 is to activate relay CR3 in the PTU, thereby pulling solenoid 124, as described above. The frequencies of Oscillator 1 and Oscillator 2 will normally be chosen from those available in the Citizens Bond, as defined by the United States Government.

Once the choke has been set, the Start pushbutton 160 can be activated, thereby enabling the transmission of the tone provided .by Oscillator 2. In the receiver portion 174 of PURC, this results in a plus signal being provided on line 178 to Amplifier 184. This positive signal is amplified, and passed via wire 186 through contact CR6-B, and over wire 188 to the relay coil CR5. Since this amounts to applying power to this relay, it is energized thereby switching its contacts CR5-A and CR5-B. The switching of CR5-A couples a ground line 72" to line 66 thereby providing the ground circuit to activate relay CR1 in PTU, and causes the starting operation to be actuated. Contact CR5-B acts as a latching contact and has its wiper coupled to the normally closed contact CR6-B via wire 190. The wiper of CR6-A in turn is coupled via line 56" to line 56', which in turn supplies the battery voltage from PTU.

Since the normally open contact of CR5-B is coupled via wire 192 to CR5, it can be seen that contact CR5-B will latch the positive battery voltage to CR5 once'CRS has been momentarily energized. This latching action will hold until the circuit supplying the voltage to CR5-B is opened. Once the engine has started, the pulsed signals are applied through the PTU onto line 52. This signal is directed to amplifier 194, where the signal is amplified to a level sufficient to activate the run relay CR6. The signal is applied to CR6 via line, and to the transmitter portion 172. When the signal on line 196 actuates CR6, contact CR6-A is actuated, thereby breaking the circuit that supplies the battery voltage on line 56" to the latching contact CR5-A. This results in CR5 being deactivated, hence the starting circuit is broken. The signal applied on line 198 is transmitted to Receiver Portion 146 in the RRCU, and results in a signal being applied on line to the RUN lamp 152. This signals the operator that the engine has started, the PURC has been deactivated, and that he can now release his hold on Start button 160, if he has not already done so.

Operation Of Embodiment ll that of Embodiment I. It can be seen that there are the two,

pushbuttons that are utilized to actuate the choke, and to initiate the starting operation, respectively. The advantage of Embodiment ll over Embodiment I is that there need be no cable connection between the set operated by the operator and the equipment that is mounted in the vicinity of the engine to be controlled. In the Power Unit Radio Control 140, relay CR4 operates in place of switch SW-2 and relay CR5 operates in place of SW-l, as described in Embodiment l. The operation of the PowerTransfer Unit is identical for Embodiment II, as that described for Embodiment I.

CONCLUSION In conclusion, then, it can be seen that the various purposes and objectives of this invention have been fully described and explained. There have been described two Embodiments of the invention which provide a very simple and inexpensive system for remotely starting an engine. Further, the invention described substantially improves on the reliability of the prior art devices in that the signal lights 'at all times advise the operator'of the state of the starting operation, and the radio control unit provides an electronic system for deactivating the starting operation when the signal is received from the engine that it is running.

Having now fully disclosed and described two circuit arrangements that embody this invention, it is understood that limitation thereto is in no way intended, and that the above described arrangements are merely illustrative of the application of the principles of the present invention. It is recognized that various modifications of specific aspects of the circuitry will become apparent to those skilled in the art, without departing from the spirit and scopeof the invention defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a starting system for remotely controlling the starting of an engine, wherein said engine is provided with an electric starter motor, a starter motor drive operative to crank the engine, a starter relay for actuating the starter motor, a carburetor pump and choke, an ignition coil, a distributor, and a battery having one terminal coupled to ground potential and a second power terminal, a remote starting control system comprising: power transfer means including first switching means having first means for receiving first control signals, and second means for coupling to the battery power terminal, said first switching means in an operative state when said first control signals are received, and in an inoperative state in the absence of said first control signals, second switching means coupled to and switched by said first switching means for holding and applying battery voltage to the starter relay once switched, said second switching means including second means for receiving second control signals and deactivating said holding in response to said second switching signals; and remote control means for coupling to said power transfer means, including first selectively actuatable control means for coupling to said first means and for providing said first control signals when actuated, and second selectively actuatable control means for coupling to said second means and for providing said second control signals when actuated, and indicator circuit means for coupling through said power transfer means to the ignition coil for indicating the operative state of the engine being controlled.

2. A remote starting control system as in claim 1 and further including a solenoid having a plunger for coupling to the carburetor pump and choke, and an energizing coil, said solenoid operative to place said plunger in a first position when battery voltage is applied to said energizing coil and in a second position in the absence of the battery voltage; and third switching means having first and second switchable states in said power transfer means for coupling to said energizing coil and the battery power terminal, said third switching means including inputmeans for coupling to said second selectively actuatable control means, and operative to switch said third switching means to said first state for applying battery voltage to said energizing coil in response to said second control signals and tosaid second state for removing battery voltage from said energizing coil in the absence of said second control signals.

3. A remote starting control system as in claim 2 wherein said first and second switching means comprise a first relay having a coil with one terminal for coupling a source of potential and a second terminal coupled to said first means for receiving first control signals, and first and second first-relay contacts, each having a normally open and a normally closed contact and a wiper terminal; a second relay having a coil with one terminal coupled to ground potential and a second terminal coupled to said wiper terminal of said first of said firstrelay contacts, first and second second-relay contacts, said first of said second-relay contacts having a normally open contact, a normally closed contact and a wiper coupled to said second means for receiving said second control signals, and said second of said second-relay contacts having a pair of normally open contacts and a wiper terminal; first coupling means for coupling said second terminal of said second relay coil to said normally open contact of said first of said second-relay contacts; second coupling means for coupling said wiper terminal of said second of said first-relay contacts to one of said pair of normally open contacts; third coupling means for coupling the other of said pair of normally open contacts to a source of potential; fourth coupling means for coupling said wiper terminal of said second of said second-relay contacts to theignition coil; and fifth coupling means for coupling said normally open contact of said second of said first-relay contacts to the starter relay.

4. A remote starting control system as in claim 3 wherein said third switching means comprises: a third relay having a coil with one terminal for coupling to a source of potential and a second terminal coupled to said normally closed contact of said first of said second-relay contacts, and a third-relay contact having a normally open contact, a normally closed contact, and a wiper; sixth coupling means for coupling said normally open contact of said third-relay contact to said energizing coil of said solenoid; and seventh, coupling means for coupling said wiper of said third-relay contacts to the source of potential, whereby said solenoid is actuated each time said second control signals are applied to said second means for receiving second control signals until said second relay is energized.

5. A remote starting control system as in claim 3 and further including heater coupling means coupled to said normally closed contact of said second of said first-relay contacts for coupling to the heaterblower for activating the blower when said first relay is deactivated and said second relay is holding. 6. A remote starting control system as in claim 2 wherein said first selectively actuatable control means comprises a first pushbutton switch having a first wiper contact, a first normally open contact and a first normally closed contact, and further includes a first coupling means coupled to said first wiper contact for coupling to said ground potential through said power transfer means, and second coupling means coupled to said first normally open contact for coupling to said first means for receiving first control signals, said first pushbutton operative when depressed to apply said ground potential as said first control signals to said first switching means, thereby energizing said first switching means to said operative state; said second selectively actuatable control means comprises a second pushbutton switch, having a second wiper contact, a second normally open contact, and a second normally closed contact, and further includes third coupling means for coupling said second normally open contact to said first normally closed contact, first impedance means having a first terminal coupled to said second wiper terminal and a second terminal for coupling to said second means for receiving second control signals, said second pushbutton alternatively operative when depressed to apply said ground potential as said second control signals to energize said third switching means for actuating said solenoid and to deactivate said second holding switching means for returning said power transfer means to an initial condition; and said indicator circuit means comprises fourth coupling means coupled to said second normally closed contact for coupling to a source of potential, transistor means having a base electrode for coupling through said power transfer means to the secondary of the ignition coil for receiving signals indicative of the operative state of the engine being controlled, an emitter electrode coupled to said fourth coupling means, and a collector electrode, second impedance means having one terminal coupled to said base electrode and a second terminal coupled to said emitter electrode for providing bias to said transistor, first lamp means having one terminal coupledto said collector electrode and a second terminal coupled to said first wiper contact for providing an indication of the operative state of said engine, and second lamp means coupled in parallel with said first impedance means for indicating the operative state of said solenoid.

7. A remote starting control system as in claim 2 wherein the coupling between said power transfer means and said remote control means comprises: connector means having first and second slidably engaging mating portions; a first group of five conductive elements coupled at one of their respective ends to predetermined elements in said power transfer means and coupled at the other of their respective ends to said first portion of said connector means; and a second group of five conductive elements associated with ones of said first group of conductive elements and coupled at one of their respective ends to predetermined elements in said remote control means and at the other of their respective ends to said second portion of said connector means.

8. A remote starting control system as in claim 2 and further including power unit radio control means coupled to said first, second, and third switching means in said power transfer means for receiving first and second radio control signals from said remote control means for controlling said switching means, and including sending means for sending indicating signals indicative of the operative condition of the engine being controlled to said remote control means.

9. A remote starting control system as in claim 8 wherein said power unit radio control means comprises: first transceiver means having a first receiver portion for receiving first and second radio control signals from said remote control means and first transmitter means for transmitting said indicating signals; fourth switching means having first output means coupled to said first means for receiving control signals and having first input means coupled to said first receiver portion for receiving said first of said radio control signals, said fourth switching means operative when activated by said first radio control signals to operate said first switching means, said fourth switching means including holding means for holding said fourth switching means operative once actuated; fifth switching means having second output means coupled to said second means for receiving second control signals and having second input means coupled to said first receiver portion for receiving said second radio control signals, said fifth switching means operative when actuated by said second radio control signals to operate said third switching means for energizing said solenoid when said second switching means is not holding, and alternatively, to deactivate said holding of said second switching means; first coupling means coupled to said first transmitter portion for coupling through said power transfer means to receive said indicating signals from the ignition coil;

and sixth switching means having third input means coupled to said first coupling means and third output means coupled to said fourth switching means for deactivating said holding means in said fourth switching means in response to signals received from the ignition coil indicating that the engine is running.

10. A remote starting system as in claim 9 wherein said first selectively actuatable control means comprises first oscillator means having a first output terminal and a first enabling input terminal, said first oscillator for generating first radio control signals at a first frequency, first pushbutton means coupled between said first enabling input terminal and a reference potential for enabling said first oscillator when said first pushbutton is depressed; said second selectively actuatable control means comprises second oscillator means having a second output terminal and a second enabling input terminal, said second oscillator for generating second radio control signals of a second frequency distinguishable from said first frequency of said first control signals, second pushbutton means coupled between said second enabling input terminal and a reference potential for enabling said first oscillator means when said second pushbutton is depressed; and further includes second transceiver means having a second transmitter portion for transmitting said first and second radio control signals and a second receiver portion for receiving said indicating signals; second and third coupling means for respectively coupling said first and second oscillator output terminals to said second transmitter portion; and said indicator circuit means comprises lamp means coupled between a reference potential and said second receiver portion for indicating the operation state of the engine being controlled.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3053989 *Jan 4, 1960Sep 11, 1962Poole JackMeans for starting automobiles
US3054904 *Feb 20, 1961Sep 18, 1962Fuciarelli FrankRemote control automotive starting system
US3163770 *Nov 28, 1961Dec 29, 1964James L SmedleyRemote starting arrangement for automobile engines
US3357417 *Apr 20, 1965Dec 12, 1967Robert J BaumannRemote control means for internal combustion engines
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3657696 *Jun 15, 1970Apr 18, 1972Gilles MorinSystem for the remote starting of motor vehicle engines
US3685606 *Aug 26, 1970Aug 22, 1972Gen Motors CorpTimer-operated car starter
US3727070 *Oct 12, 1971Apr 10, 1973G LiangRemote control automobile engine starting apparatus
US3731108 *Aug 30, 1971May 1, 1973 Engine automatic control system and method for vehicles
US3767932 *Sep 1, 1972Oct 23, 1973C BaileyRemote vehicle starting system
US3788294 *Dec 21, 1971Jan 29, 1974H LoganRemote control starting device for internal combustion engine
US4227588 *Dec 6, 1978Oct 14, 1980Biancardi Michael JAutomatic vehicle starting apparatus
US4236594 *Aug 21, 1978Dec 2, 1980Skip D. McFarlinSystem for automatically controlling automotive starting and accessory functions
US5042439 *Mar 15, 1990Aug 27, 1991Gene ThollRemote, safe, and secure operational control of an internal combustion engine
US5539388 *Jun 7, 1995Jul 23, 1996National Digital Electronics, Inc.Telemetry and control system
US5689142 *May 24, 1996Nov 18, 1997Continocean Tech Inc.Keyless motor vehicle starting system with anti-theft feature
US6075459 *Jun 1, 1998Jun 13, 2000Saarem; Myrl J.Remote starter for a combustion engine/electric generator set
US8487460 *Jul 26, 2006Jul 16, 2013Repower Systems SeWind energy installation with individual pitch devices
US8710949 *Jul 24, 2009Apr 29, 2014Augi AgRemote ignition system for a vehicle and method for securing a remote ignition function
US20110148566 *Jul 24, 2009Jun 23, 2011Ingo LedendeckerRemote Ignition System for a Vehicle and Method for Securing a Remote Ignition Function
EP0064581A1 *May 13, 1981Nov 17, 1982DEERE & COMPANYStarter arrangement for internal combustion engine
EP0139807A1 *May 9, 1983May 8, 1985TECKEL S.r.l.Device for timed or radio control of warm-up and ignition of the engine of a motor vehicle
Classifications
U.S. Classification290/38.00R
International ClassificationF02N11/08
Cooperative ClassificationF02N11/0807
European ClassificationF02N11/08A2