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Publication numberUS3553631 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 5, 1971
Filing dateNov 27, 1968
Priority dateNov 27, 1968
Publication numberUS 3553631 A, US 3553631A, US-A-3553631, US3553631 A, US3553631A
InventorsShlesinger Bernard Edward Jr
Original AssigneeShlesinger Jr Bernard E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Nonstrip connection
US 3553631 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Enf-T5, 97? a. E. sHLEsuNGER, JR 3553,31

NONSTRIP CGNNECTION 'Filed Nov. 27,

2 Sheets-Sheet n Jm- 5, 1971 s. E. SHLESINGER, .m 3,553,533

NONS TRI P CONNECTION Filed Nov. 27, 196e 2 sheets-sheet 2 INVENTOR lffm/ United States Patent O 3,553,631 N ONSTRIP CONNECTION Bernard Edward Shlesinger, Jr., 3906 Bruce Lane, Annandale, Va. 22003 Filed Nov. 27, 1968, Ser. No. 779,548 Int. Cl. H011' 11/20 U.S. Cl. 339-97 32 Claims ABSTRACT THE DISCLOSURE A nonstrip connector for insulated conductors comprising a conductor receptacle, including means for supporting an insulated conductor therein; the receptacle, including cam means on the inside surface thereof; a conductive insert cooperating with and insertable into the receptacle; the insert including at least one disposable insulation penetrating means; the receptacle having its maximum internal width approximating the maximum clearance width of the insert prior to depression of the insulation penetrating means; whereby after the conductor has been positioned in the receptacle, the cam means cooperates with the penetrating means when the insert is inserted into the receptacle to deflect the penetrating means inwardly to penetrate the insulation on the conductor and thus make an electrical connection.

This invention relates to solderless connectors, and more specifically to connectors which penetrate the insulation on the conductor so as to avoid the necessity of having to pre-strip the insulation from the conductor. The connection is made by camming the penetrating portion of the connector in such a manner as to cut through the insulation to the conductive material of the conductor. The use of a crimp sleeve to seal the conductor in the connector is also employed in this invention. Relative to this matter, reference is made to my U.S. Pat. 3,390,227, issued June 25, 1968.

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND In the history of connectors for insulated conductors, the prior art does show the use of cam connections such as in the patent to Alford, 2,470,423, May 17, 1949; Schneider, 3,041,575, June 26, 1962; and Gordon, 2,725,- 545, Nov. 29, 1955. In general, the prior art involved a great many pieces to accomplish the connection and camming operation.

OBJECTS AND SUMMARY It is an object of this invention to provide a non-strip connector for insulated conductors which is simple to manufacture and use.

Another object of this invention is to provide an electrical connector which can be adapted to program boards and the like.

A further object of this invention is to provide an electrical connector which provides positive sealing so that the connector might be used in underground or similar areas where shorting out might take place due to water or the like surrounding the connector.

Still another object of this invention is to provide an electrical connector which can be used as a jack for plugin receptacles.

A further object of this invention is to provide an electrical connector which can be adapted to connect conductors and-to-and or side-by-side.

Still a further object of this invention is to provide an electrical connector which can be ring crimped.

In summary, this invention relates to non-strip camcrimped connectors requiring only a single integral insert and a cam receptacle for the insert to make the connection.

ICC

These and other objects of the invention will be apparent from the following description and claims.

In the accompanying drawings which illustrate by way of example various embodiments of this invention:

FIG. 1 is a cross sectional view of an assembled connector as disclosed in this application;

FIG. 2 is an exploded View in cross section of the connector as illustrated in FIG. 1 with the conductors removed;

FIG. 3 is a cross sectional view of another embodiment of this invention showing an assembled connector;

FIG. 4 is an exploded view in cross section showing the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 3 with the conductors removed;

FIG. 5 is a cross sectional view taken along the lines 5 5 in FIG. 4 and viewed in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 6 is an exploded view in cross section in still another embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged perspective cross sectional fragmentary view of a panel board in which a connector may be used;

FIG. 8 is a cross sectional exploded view illustrating the conductor and the insert therefor which may be used in the receptacle adaptor or panel board, as illustrated in FIGS. 6 and 7;

FIG. 9 illustrates the insert of FIG. 8 as used in the panel board of FIG. 7;-

FIG. 10 is a cross sectional view illustrating a plug incorporating another embodiment of this invention;

FIG. ll is a perspective view illustrating a sleeve or insert for use with side-by-side conductors;

FIG. 12 is an end view with the conductors shown in cross section illustrating the sleeve of FIG. 11 and the manner in which the fingers of the insert penetrate the insulation to engage the conductive portion of the conductors.

FIGS. 1 AND 2 In FIGS. 1 and 2, the connector C comprises a tubular receptacle 2. The receptacle or sleeve member 2 is provided at either end with an expanded chamber 4 providing cam surfaces 6. The receptacle 2 may be constructed from metal or plastic tubing or from thin sheet stock material by extrusion, die forming, etc. If the receptacle 2 is manufactured of plastic material, it may be conductive by coating the inside surface with a conductive material or by forming in its entirety of conductive material.

The receptacle 2 is provided with a central chamber 8. The central chamber 8 receives the electrical conductors 10. The chambers 4 have an internal width substantially that of the external sleeve diameter of the conductor inserts 12. The conductor inserts 12 are provided with a stop shoulder 14 for limiting the travel of the insert into the chamber 4. The inserts 12 are provided with a plurality of insulation penetrating fingers 16. The ends of the ngers 16 are sharpened to easily penetrate the insulation of the electrical conductors 10. The overall length of the conductor inserts 12 is slightly in excess of the length of the chambers 4. Thus, when the electrical conductors are inserted into the chambers 4 their full distance so that the stop shoulders 14 bear against the end of the chambers 4, the insulation penetrating fingers 16 will have been deflected inwardly by means of the cam surfaces 6 and driven into the insulation of the conductors 10, a distance sutilcient to penetrate to the wire within the conductor so as to make adequate electrical contact therewith. Current will then ow from one of the conductors 10 through one of the conductor inserts 12 along the receptacle 2 and through the other conductor insert 12 to the opposite electrical conductor 10, completing the connection.

The connector C is provided with a two-piece housing comprising a male housing member 18 and a female housing member 20. The male and female members 18 and are threaded together for maintaining the inserts 12 in the chambers 4. The male and female housing members 18 and 20 are provided with O-rings 22 to provide a positive seal on the conductor C, thus permitting the conductor to be used in underground installations or other installations where dampness might affect and short out the connection.

The conductor inserts 12 may be split lengthwise and provided on the inside with a gripping surface so that when the housing members 18 and 20 are threaded together, they will exert a binding pressure on the electrical conductors 10 to aid in preventing ready removal of the electrical conductors from the connector C. Further, in order to prevent rotation of the conductor inserts in the receptacles 2, means (not shown) such as a tine or detent engageable with the receptacle 2 may be provided. Such means would prevent the inserts 12 from rotating when the male and female housing members 18 and 20 are threaded together.

FIGS. 3, 4 AND 5 In FIGS. 3, 4, and 5, the connector C includes a receptacle 24 which may be made of plastic such as nylon, teflon, etcetera. The inside surface of the receptacle 24 may be provided with a sheet metal conductive insert or coating 26. If a metal insert 26 is used, the receptable 24 can be formed around the insert. The insert 26 is provided with annular recesses 28 for receipt of crimp rings 30. The receptacle 24 is provided with chambers 32 at either end thereof provided with cam slots 34. A central chamber 36 is provided for receipt of the electrical conductors 38. A positioning stop 40 is provided in the central chamber 36 for positioning the electrical conductors 38.

Conductor inserts 42 are provided including stop shoulders 44 and insulation penetrating fingers 46. It is to be noted that whereas in the case of FIGS. 1 and 2 the fingers 16 were flush with the body of the conductor insert 12, in this instance, the fingers 46 are flexed outwardly beyond the main tubular surface of the conductor inserts 42.

In assembly of the connector C in FIGS. 3, 4, and 5, the sleeves or conductor inserts 42 are slipped over the electrical conductors 38 and forced into the chambers 32. The cam slots 34 will deflect the fingers 46 downwardly into the insulation and subsequently into the Wire of the electrical conductors 38. Once the inserts 42 have been fully inserted into the chambers 32, the crimp rings 30 are compressed (not shown) thereby preventing withdrawal of the electrical conductors 38. For consideration of the compression or crimp rings 30 and their action, reference is made to my U.S. Pat. 3,390,227, referred to above.

FIGS. 6, 7, 8, AND 9 In FIG. 6, the connector C is quite similar to one-half of the structure illustrated in FIGS. 3 through 5. The receptacle 48 is provided with a chamber 50 having cam slots 52 and 54. It is to be noted that the cam slots 54 are longer than the cam slots 52. An annular groove 56 is also provided in the chamber 50. The receptacle 48 includes a crimp ring 58.

Conductor insert 60 is provided with a nose or pin portion 62 and fingers 64 and 66. It is to be noted that the fingers -66 are longer than the fingers 64, and that these fingers 66 engage in the slots 54, Whereas the fingers 64 engage in the slots 52. This provides for penetration in two different areas on the electrical conductor 68 which is inserted into the receptacle 48. An annular bead 70 is provided on the conductor insert 60 for engagement with the annular groove 56 in order to provide snap action therein. 'Ihe receptacle 48 may in this instance be made of plastic as aforementioned described. The electrical conductor 68 is first inserted directly into the chamber 72 of the conductor insert 60 and the insert is then forced into the receptacle 48 and locked in by crimping the crimp ring 58.

FIG. 7 illustrates a panel board or block 74 provided with receptacles 76 which may be coated or lined with a conductive insert 78.

The receptacles 76 in the panel board 74 are provided with annular recesses 80 which would cooperate with a bead such as 70 on a plug or insert similar to 60 illustrated in FIG. 6. The insert 60 in FIG. 6 would have to be modified to have all of the fingers of equal length due to the configuration of the receptacle 76 in the panel board 74. It is obvious that the receptacles 76 can be modified to take various types of plugs such as insert 60; insert 42 as in FIG. 3; or insert 12 as in FIG. 1. It is noted that the receptacles 76 in the panel board 74 have openings at 82 at the bottom thereof into which an electrical conductor can be inserted.

An insert such as 60 in FIG. 6 may have the nose portion cut off along the score line 84 as illustrated in FIG. 6. This would permit the sleeve to project upwardly out of the board for receipt of a plug or pin, etcetera.

FIG. 8 illustrates a modified insert 86 with a nose 88. The insulation penetrating lingers are provided midway of the insert 86. A bead 92 is provided for snapping into the annular recess 80 in the panel board 74 or into the annular recess 56 in the connector C of FIG. 6.

A stop shoulder 94 may be provided for the insert 86. In assembly, the electrical conductor 96 is inserted into the opening 98 and the insert forced into the panel board or into any one of the typical receptacles heretofore described for connecting the electrical conductor 96 to the insert 86. FIG. 9 illustrates the use of the connector 86 in a receptacle in a panel board somewhat as illustrated in FIG. 7.

FIG. 10

The arrangement in FIG. 10 can be adapted for any one of the other ymodifications illustrated and aforementioned. Specifically, the connector C includes a receptable 100 having slots 102 for receiving the fingers 104 of the insert 106. The insert is provided with a nose portion 108 which extends beyond the end of the receptacle 100. The electrical conductor 110 is inserted into the insert and the insert is small enough to pass through the throated opening 112 in the receptacle 100. A threaded sleeve 114 which was previously placed on the electrical conductor 110 is now threaded into the threaded opening 1'12 to force the insert 106 forward to cause the fingers 104 to penetrate the insulation of the electrical conductor 110 and thus to make contact with the wire of the electrical conductor 110.

FIGS. 11 AND l2 FIGS. 11 and 12 show an insert 116 which is flattened and elongated to receive a pair of electrical side-by-side conductors 118 and 120. FIG. 12 shows how the insulation piercing fingers 122 pierce the insulation and make contact with the conductor wires 1124 and 126. It is obvious that an oblong slot will be required for receiving a receptacle such as 116.

While the invention has been described in connection with different embodiments thereof, it will be understood that it is capable of further modification, and this application is intended to cover any variations, uses or adaptations of the invention following in general the principles of the invention and including such departures from the present disclosure as come Within known or customary practice in the art to which the invention pertains, and as may be applied to the essential features hereinbefore set forth as fall within the scope of the invention or the limits of the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, Kwhat I claim is:

1. A non-strip connector for insulated conductors cornprising:

(a) a conductor receptacle including means for supporting an insulated conductor therein (b) `said receptacle including cam means on the inside surface thereof (c) a conductive annular one-piece sleeve insert cooperating with and insertable into said receptacle (d) said insert including a plurality of depressible insulation penetrating means (e) said sleeve insert prior to depression of said insulation penetrating means having a substantially uniform internal diameter at least in one direction and throughout a major portion of its length substantially equal to the diameter of the insulated conductor to be connected for providing continuous support to a longitudinal section of said insulated conductor (f) said receptacle having its maximum internal width approximating the maximum clearance width of said insert prior to depression of said insulation penetrating means (g) whereby after said conductor has been positioned in said receptacle, said cam means cooperates with said penetrating means when said `insert is inserted into said receptacle to deflect said penetrating means inwardly to penetrate the insulation on said conductor to thus make an electrical connection.

2. A non-strip connector as in claim 1 and wherein:

(a) said penetrating means prior to depression projects above the main surface plane the sleeve portion of said insert.

3i. A non-strip connector as in claim 1 and wherein:

(a) said penetrating means prior to depression lies in the same surface plane of the sleeve portion of said insert.

4. A non-strip connector as in claim 1 and wherein:

(a) said receptacle cam means includes at least one slot for receiving said penetrating means, and

(b) said slot extends above the main surface plane of said insert.

5. A non-strip connector as in claim 1 and wherein:

(a) said insulation penetrating means extends beyond the end of the sleeve portion of said insert.

6. A non-strip connector as in claim 1 and including:

(a) means for locking said insert in said receptacle.

7. A non-strip connector as in claim 1 and including:

(a) a conductive coating on said receptacle.

8. A non-strip connector as in claim 1 and including:

(a) means for forcing said insert into said receptacle.

9. A non-strip connector as in claim 1 and wherein:

(a) said receptacle includes a plug end.

v10. A non-strip connector as in claim 1 and wherein:

(a) said insert includes a plug end.

11. A non-strip connector as in claim 1 and including:

(a) a plurality of said receptacles mounted in side-byside relation and spaced from each other, and

(b) one of said inserts for each receptacle.

12. A non-strip connector as in claim 1 and wherein:

(a) said receptacle includes a conductor in contact with said conductive insert.

:13. A non-strip connector as in claim 1 and including:

(a) a pair of said receptacles with said cam means for each of said receptacles in back-to-back relation, and

(b) and insert for each of said receptacles.

14. A non-strip connector as in claim 13 and wherein: (a) said receptacles are integrally connected to each other and form a one-piece sleeve, and including (b) a two-piece housing for receiving said receptacles and inserts. 15. A non-strip connector as in claim 1 and including: (a) stop means for limiting the travel of said conductive insert in said receptacle. `16. A non-strip connector as in claim 15 and wherein: (a) said conductive insert stop means includes limit means on said insert cooperating with limit means on said receptacle.

17. A non-strip connector as in claim and wherein:

(a) said conductive insert stop means includes shoulder means on said insert cooperating with shoulder means on said receptacle.

18. A non-strip connector as in claim 1 and including:

(a) a plurality of said depressible insulation penetrating means for cooperating with said cam means.

19. A non-strip connector as in claim 18 and wherein:

(a) said receptacle is oval, and

(b) said insert is oval for connecting side-by-side insulated conductors.

20. A nonstrip connector as in claim 18 and wherein:

(a) said plurality of insulation penetrating means are spaced from each other and extend longitudinally from one end of said sleeve portion of said insert.

21. A non-strip connector as in claim 20 and wherein:

(a) said plurality of insulation penetrating means are equally spaced from each other.

22. A non-strip connector as in claim 20 and wherein:

(a) said plurality of insulation penetrating means include at least one of a dierent length than another.

23. A non-strip connector as in claim 22 and wherein:

(a) said cam means includes a series of cam surfaces axially spaced from each other about the central axis of said receptacle.

24. A non-strip connector as in claim 23 and wherein:

(a) said cam surfaces include at least one of a different length than another.

25. A non-strip connector as in claim 1 and including:

(a) crimp means for locking said insert to said receptacle.

26. A non-strip connector as in claim 25 and wherein:

(a) said crimp means includes a crimp ring.

27. A non-strip connector as in claim 1 and including:

(a) a pair of said receptacles interconnected and coaxially aligned,

(b) one of said inserts for each of said receptacles, and

(c) said receptacles being conductively connected.

28. A non-strip connector as in claim 27 and including:

(a) crimp means for each receptacle.

29. A non-strip connector as in claim 28 and wherein:

(a) said crimp means includes a pair of crimp rings.

30. A non-strip connector as in claim 1 and wherein:

(a) said means for supporting the insulated conductortherein includes a recess at the bottom of said receptacle having substantially the same width as said conductor.

31. A non-strip connector as in claim 30 and wherein:

(a) said insert is of a greater width than said recess.

32. A non-strip connector as in claim 30 and wherein:

(a) said cam means is of a greater width than said recess.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS FOREIGN PATENTS 7/1962 Italy 174-89 MARVIN A. CHAMPION, Primary Examiner I. H. MCGLYNN, Assistant Examiner U.S. Cl. X.R.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3766514 *Nov 26, 1971Oct 16, 1973Kimm HElectric wire connecting device
US4370014 *Nov 7, 1980Jan 25, 1983The Bendix CorporationInsulated wire termination device
US4451104 *May 27, 1982May 29, 1984At&T Technologies, Inc.Apparatus for splicing electric wires
US4501463 *Dec 14, 1982Feb 26, 1985Siemens AktiengesellschaftCable terminal element
US4512619 *Jul 20, 1983Apr 23, 1985Molex IncorporatedInsulation displacement terminal for an electrical connector _and environmental sealing means therefor
US5432302 *Nov 19, 1992Jul 11, 1995The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyHydrostatic sealing sleeve for spliced wire connections
US5821461 *May 20, 1997Oct 13, 1998Shaw Industries LimitedWaterproof splice for cables having different insulation materials and method of making same
Classifications
U.S. Classification439/391, 174/84.00R
International ClassificationH01R4/24
Cooperative ClassificationH01R4/2412
European ClassificationH01R4/24A4