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Publication numberUS3554284 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 12, 1971
Filing dateMay 2, 1969
Priority dateMay 2, 1969
Publication numberUS 3554284 A, US 3554284A, US-A-3554284, US3554284 A, US3554284A
InventorsNystrom Horace A
Original AssigneeSchlumberger Technology Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Methods for facilitating the descent of well tools through deviated well bores
US 3554284 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Zil'i 3,165,156 1/1965 Kokesh 166/243 3,363,880 l/l968 Blagg 166/77X 3,396,799 8/1968 Anderson et al 166/243 3,401,749 9/l 968 Daniel l66/77X 3,465,356 9/1969 Porter l66/63X Primary ExaminerDavid H. Brown Atlorneys- Ernest R. Archambeau, Jr., William J. Beard,

David L. Moseley, Edward M. Roney, William R. Sherman and Stewart F. Moore ABSTRACT: To practice the new and improved methods of the invention disclosed herein, a well tool is dependently suspended from an electrical logging cable that is uniquely constructed to withstand limited axial compressive loading without undue lateral bending. in this manner, by selectively moving the suspension cable downwardly from the surface, corresponding axial compressive forces are developed in the lower portion of the cable, which forces are, in turn, imposed on the well tool for assisting its continued descent through substantially deviated well bore intervals.

mama) JAN 1 2 :sn

FIG. 7A

Horace A. Nystrom INVENTOR A TTORNEY METHODS FOR FACILITATING THE DESCENT OF WELL TOOLS THROUGH DEVIATED WELL BORES In some oil fields, it is not at all uncommon to find well bores having highly-slanted intervals therein that may approach angles deviating from the vertical as much as 60 to 80. It is, of course, all but impossible to simply lower a cablesuspended well tool to the bottom of such highly-deviated well bores. It will be appreciated, therefore, that unless suitable means and techniques are devised for moving cablesuspended well tools through such highly-deviated holes, they cannot be logged or perforated in the usual manner.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide new and improved methods for facilitating the descent of cable-suspended well tools through highly-deviated well bores.

It is another object of the present invention to provide new and improved methods for selectively imposing downwardlydirected forces to cable-suspended well bore apparatus for promoting the continued movement of such tools into deviated well bores.

These and other objects of the present invention are accomplished by coupling a well too] that is to be lowered into a well bore having one or more deviated intervals to a relatively-stiff suspension cable that is spooled on a typical powered winch. So long as the well too] continues to descend into the well bore, the cable is allowed to unreel from the winch at a desired speed. Once, however, the descent of the tool is slowed or checked as, for example, when the tool moves into a highlydeviated interval of the well bore, the cable is moved downwardly to reduce tensile forces therein and develop corresponding compressive forces in the lower portion of the cable. In this manner, since at least the lower portion of the cable has sufficient lateral rigidity that it cannot be doubled back onto itself, these downwardly-acting compressive forces will be transmitted to the tool for promoting its further movement.

The novel features of the present invention are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. The invention, together with further objects and advantages thereof, may be best understood by way of the following description of exemplary methods employing the principles of the invention as illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1A depicts a typical arrangement of the surface equipment employed for imposing downward forces to a well tool suspended from a logging cable in a well bore;

FIG. 1B shows a well tool as it may appear while being pushed through a deviated borehole during the practice of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of theupper portion of an exemplary well too] particularly suited for practicing the present invention; and

FIG. 3 is an isometric view, partially in cross section, of a unique suspension cable particularly arranged for the practice of the present invention.

Turning now to FIG. 18, a well tool such as an electrical logging instrument or other well-completion tool is depicted as it is being moved through a highly-deviated interval of a well bore which, in this instance, is illustrated as being an uncased borehole 11. Although the specific nature of the well tool 10 is of no consequence to the present invention, it is preferred that the tool include some means, as at 12, for providing signals at the surface that are at least indicative of whether or not the tool is moving through the borehole 11. Thus, in one manner of providing such signals, where the tool 10 is a typical logging instrument the signalling means 12 may include a typical radioactivity detector or other measuring device which responds to some characteristic of earth formations. On the other hand, if the tool 10 is a perforator or other completion tool for use in a cased well bore, the measuring device 12 could also be a typical casing collar locator. In any event, the signals produced by the measuring device 12 will vary whenever the tool 10 is movingand, as a result, will provide at least a qualitative indication of the rate of descent of the well tool through the borehole ll.

The well tool 10 is dependently coupled to the lower end of a uniquely-constructed logging cable 13 which, as will subsequently be explained, is appropriately arranged to withstand substantial axial compressive loads without being doubled back onto itself within the confines of the borehole ll. As seen in FIG. 1A, the logging cable 13 is spooled in the usual fashion on a powered winch 14 and has previously been directed into the surface casing 15 that customarily lines the walls of the upper portion of the borehole 11. As is typical the winch 14 is positioned in a convenient location adjacent to the surface casing 15 and the cable 13 is preferably directed into the casing by means of upper and lower pulleys or sheaves l6 and 17 aligned with one another and the winch and respectively supported directly above the casing and to one side thereof. It will be appreciated, of course, that the winch 14 is operatively equipped with brakes and a driving mechanism (neither shown) by which the winch drum may be selectively driven in either rotative direction and at any suitable'rotational speed. The upper sheave 16 is typically supported in a derrick (not shown) a strain gage 18 that is coupled to a suitable indicator 19 for measuring the tension forces .on the electrical logging cable 13. As is usual, a calibrated measuring wheel 20 that is frictionally driven by the running portion of the cable 13 is coupled to a totalizer 21 for measuring the length of the cable being reeled onto or off of the winch 14 and a tachometer 22 for indicating the speed of the cable. A suitable instrument 23 is electrically coupled by way of the armored logging cable 13 to the measuring device 12 in the well tool 10.

Turning now to FIG. 2, the upper portion of the well tool 10 is shown in cross section to illustrate a preferred embodiment of signalling means 24 for indicating when an axial force is being effectively imposed through the suspension cable 13 to the well tool. As illustrated, the lower end of the suspension cable 13 is suitably secured within a cylindrical body 25 that is slidably received within the open upper end of a tubular housing 26 coupled to the upper end of the well tool 10. To limit the upward longitudinal travel of the cylindrical body 25 in relation to the housing 26, an elongated sleeve 27 having an inwardly-directed shoulder 28 is secured within the housing to position the shoulder above the upper face 29 of an enlargeddiameter head 30 arranged on the lower end of the cylindrical body. Conversely, downward longitudinal travel of the cylindrical body 25 is limited by an enlarged-diameter shoulder 31 arranged around an intermediate portion of the cylindrical body to engage an upwardly-facing shoulder such as defined by the upper end 32 of the sleeve 27. To corotatively secure the cylindrical body 25 in relation to the housing 26, means such as a longitudinal spline-and-groove arrangement, as at 33, are provided on the enlarged head 30 and internal wall of the sleeve 27.

Accordingly, it will be appreciated that the cylindrical body 25 is free to travel axially in relation to the housing 26 within the limits provided between the opposed upper shoulders 31 and 32 and the opposed lower shoulders 28 and 29. For reasons that will subsequently become apparent, the cylindri-- cal body 25 is biased upwardly in relation to the housing 26 by means such as a compression spring 34 coaxially disposed within the tubular housing and yieldably restrained between the shoulder 31 and a ring 35 mounted around the elongated sleeve 27.

As shown in FIG. 2, the cylindrical body 25 is not fluidlysealed in relation to the housing 26 so that the tubular-housing will be filled with the borehole fluids. To prevent the borehole fluids from electrically shorting the various cable conductors, as at 36, the conductors are appropriately sealed within the cylindrical body 25 and connected, as at 37, to conductors, as at 38, leading to the interior of the well tool 10 and brought through typical conductor seals (not shown) sealingly mounted in a transverse partition 39 across the lower end of the tubular housing 26. Accordingly, inasmuch as the hydrostatic pressure of the borehole fluids will be acting on both sides of the cylindrical body 25, there will be no unbalanced pressure forces affecting the relative longitudinal position of the cylindrical body in relation to the-tool housing 26. Thus,

imposition of a downwardly-directed force through the cable 13 to the cylindrical body 25 will be effective to move the cylindrical body downwardly in relation to the housing 26 against the spring force of the compression spring 34. Similarly, in the usual situation, the weight of the well tool will be transmitted to the logging cable 13 by means of the opposed shoulders 28 and 29. Thus, it will be appreciated that so long as the well tool 10 is dependently suspended from the logging cable 13, the shoulders 28 and 29 will be abutted; and a downwardly-acting force at least as great as the potential spring force provided by the compression spring 34 will be required to shift the cylindrical body 25 downwardly in relation to the tool housing 26 so as to bring the shoulders 31 and 32 into abutment.

Accordingly, it will be appreciated that when the well tool 10 is suspended, the cylindrical body 25 will be at its depicted upper position in relation to the tool housing 26 so that the full weight of the tool is supported by the shoulders 28 and 29. Similarly, as the tool 10 is moving through a deviated well bore, such as the the borehole ll, upwardly-directed forces on the housing 26 tending to slow or halt further progress of the well tool 10 will be countered by the longitudinal or axial component of the weight of the well tool. It will be seen, therefore, that when the cylindrical body 25 is elevated in relation to the tool housing 26, the summation of the downwardly-acting forces on the well tool 10 (such as the longitudinal component of the tool weight) is greater than the downwardly-acting forces on the cylindrical body 25 are equal or greater than the upwardly-directed forces on the tool housing 26 (such as frictional drag) tending to slow or halt the well too] 10 as well as the spring force of the spring 34, the cylindrical body will be shifted downwardly to bring the shoulder 31 into abutment with the shoulder 32. Thereafter, so long as these downwardly-acting forces on the cylindrical body 25 predominate, these downwardly-acting forces will be effective for pushing the well tool 10.

Accordingly, in the preferred manner of providing the signalling means 24 for indicating the position of the cylindrical body 25 in relation to the tool housing 26, a proximity switch, such as a so-called reed switch 40 adapted for remote magnetic actuation, is encapsulated in a suitable pressure-resistant case and secured, as by spring clips 41, within the elongated sleeve 27. To actuate the proximity-sensing switch 40, a magnet 42 is encapsulated in a suitable case 43 and dependently secured below the cylindrical body 25 for movement thereby into and out of the proximity ofthe switch. In this preferred embodiment, the switch 40 is normally open and the magnet 42 is longitudinally positioned in relation thereto for actuating the switch upon movement of the cylindrical body 25 to its lower position to shift the magnet case 43 to the position shown by the dashed lines at 44.

To provide means for adjusting the relative longitudinal positions of the magnet 42 and switch 40, a depending rod 45 supporting the magnet case 43 is preferably threaded so that the magnet case can be screwed upwardly or downwardly along the rod. One lead 46 from the switch 40 is connected to a selected conductor 36a in the logging cable 13 and another switch lead 47 is electrically connected to either another cable connector or to the tool housing 26 as at 48. Since the armor of the logging cable 13 is electrically connected to the housing 26, the cable armor will serve as a return path. In this manner, so long as the switch 40 is open, the cable conductor 36a will not be connected to any other cable conductors; and, upon movement of the magnet 42 to its lower position 44, the switch will close to connect the cable conductor 36a to the tool housing 26. Thus, by connecting a suitable electrical instrument such as, for example, an ohmmeter 49 between the cable armor and the conductor 36a at the surface, a surface indication will be provided representative of the longitudinal position of the cylindrical body 25 in relation to the tool housing 26.

Turning now to FIG. 3, an isometric view is shown of a preferred embodiment of the suspension cable 13 to illustrate its unique construction. As fully explained in a copending application Ser. No. 827,186, filed May 2, 1969 the logging cable 13 has a central axial core 50 comprised of a plurality of insulated electrical conductors 36 that are symmetically grouped and encased in a suitable sheath 51 which, for example, may be either braided Nylon strands or spirally-wrapped insulating tape. To give the core 50 a generally cylindrical form, the interstitial spaces between the electrical conductors 36 and the sheath 51 are filled with semiconductive materials such as cotton fillers 52. To reduce the effects of capacitive coupling between the several cable conductors 36, the outer surfaces of the insulating sheath 53 of each cable conductor 36 is coated with a thin, electrically-semiconductive film and the cotton fillers 52 and Nylon braid 51 (or spiraled tape) are impregnated with an electrically-semiconductive compound. Thus, in the finished cable core 50, each insulated conductor 36 is surrounded by a semiconductive film which is electrically connected to the external armor 54 of the logging cable 13.

To protect the central cable core 50, the external armor 54 is comprised of a unique arrangement of four concentric layers 55-58 of helically-wound armor strands wound in a particular manner around the central core. The two innermost layers 55 and 56 of the armor 54 are assembled onto the central core 50 in the usual manner. That is to say, the innermost layer 55 of the armor 54 comprises a plurality of metallic strands wound in one so-called lay direction about the core 50, and the second layer 56 of the armor similarly comprises a plurality of metallic strands wound in the opposite lay" direction about the innermost armor layer. The number, size, and pitch or lay angle of the first and second layers are chosen so that the innermost layer 55 substantially covers the central core 50 and the second layer 56 substantially covers the first layer. As is customary, these inner layers 55 and 56 of the armor 54 perform the usual tension-bearing functions of the cable 13 as well as protect the central cable core 50 from damage.

It will be appreciated, of course. that if the logging cable 13 had only the two inner layers 55 and 56 of armor strands, as is typical for such cables, the cable would have only minimal longitudinal stability for withstanding axial compressive loads. Accordingly, inasmuch as the electrical logging cable 13 must also be capable of transmitting axially-directed compression forces through its lower portion to the well tool 10, the two outer layers 57 and 58 of the armor 54 are uniquely arranged to laterally stiffen the cable to withstand such compression forces without materially reducing the ability of the cable to be spooled onto the winch 14 and operatively carried over the sheaves l6 and 17. More significantly, these two outer layers 57 and 58 are uniquely wound in oppositely-directed lays and respectively have a pitch angle in the order of about 35 as compared to only about 18 for the two layers 55 and 56.

Accordingly, by virtue of the substantial pitch angles of the two outer layers 57 and 58, the logging cable 13 will be incapable of doubling back on itself within the diameter of a typically-sized well bore. Thus, when compressive loads are imposed on the lower portion of the suspension cable 13, these loads will initially be transmitted through the cable to the tool 10 and gradually begin bending the lowennost length of the cable into a long helix. However, instead of doubling back on itself as would otherwise he usually expected, the logging cable 13 will continue transmitting axial compressive loads to the tool 10 until it has been helically looped so as to expand the cable loops into engagement with the walls of the borehole 11. Ultimately, of course, the frictional engagement of the helical loops of the cable 13 with the walls of the borehole 11 will be sufficient to tightly wedge the cable so that further compressive loads cannot be imposed therethrough so long as the loops are against the borehole wall.

With this unusual ability of the-logging cable 13 in mind, it will, therefore, be appreciated that as the well tool 10 is progressively moved downwardly through the borehole l1, axial compressive loads can be imposed thereon by way of the cable.

Thus, in the practice of the present invention, the well tool is lowered into the borehole 11 at, preferably, as high a speed as can be attained by free fall of the well too through the borehole fluids. This of course, means that for most situations, the winch 14 will be allowed to freewheel so that the weight of the well tool 10 and progressively-increasing weight of the logging cable 13 hanging in the borehole 11 will be effective for carrying the well tool to as great a depth as is possible. It will be recognized, of course, that so long as the well tool 10 is moving relatively freely, the switch 40 will remain open. Once the well tool 10 enters a relatively-deviated interval of the borehole 11 as shown in FIG. 1B, the tool, of course, will ultimately be halted and come to rest in a position such as that illustrated. If the tool 10 does halt, this willbe apparent at the surface since the electrical signal provided by the logging device 12 included with the tool will now show an unvarying signal on the instrument 23 in contrast to the usual varying signals that normally occur as the tool is moving.

When the operator at the surfaces has ascertained that the tool 10 has in fact come to rest, in one manner of practicing the present invention, the winch 14 can be powered forwardly (as at 59) in such a manner as to unreel an additional length of the cable 13. Inasmuch as the portion of the cable 13 running over the sheaves 16 and 17 and a substantial proportion of its length within the borehole 11 will be under extreme tension, powering of the winch 14 will, in effect, merely reduce this tension load in the major portion of the logging cable. At some point, however, very near to the tool 10, the tensile load on this lower portion of the cable 13 will be zero so that any further downward force on the cable will induce a compressive force in the portion of the cable therebelow. Thus, the lowermost portion of the cable 13 will instead have an axial compressive load imposed thereon which is, of course, transmitted downwardly, to the slidable cylindrical body 25 in the upper end of the tool housing 26.

If this compressive load is less than the opposing spring force provided by the compressive Spring 34, a corresponding downwardly-directed force will be transmitted by way of the spring to the tool housing 26 which, hopefully, will be sufficient to move the well tool 10 still further. If, on the other hand, this downwardly-acting compressive load on the logging cable 13 is greater than the opposing spring force provided by the spring 34, the cylindrical body 25 will move downwardly in relation to the tool housing 26; and, once the magnet 42 reaches the position 44 opposite the switch 40, the switch contacts will close and provide an indication at the surface on the ohmmeter 49 that such has occurred This information will, therefore, advise the operator at the surface that a force of at least as great as the spring force of the spring 34 is being applied to the tool 10 for moving it further downwardly in relation to the borehole 11. If the well tool 10 does in fact begin to move further downwardly, the logging device 12 will again provide varying electrical signals indicative of the different formation materials being passed by the moving well tool. On the other hand, if the downward forces are not sufficient to move the well tool 10, the steady reading on the instrument 22 provided by the logging device 12 will advise the operator that the tool is not moving. Moreover, the ohmmeter 49 will provide an indication of whether these downward forces are actually being imposed on the tool 10. Then, the winch 14 can be driven forwardly, as at 59, to insure that the cable 13 is hanging free which will be indicated by substantial flexing of the portion of the logging cable between the lower sheave 17 and the winch. Once the cable 13 has been significantly flexed in this running portion of the cable, the cable can be pushed downwardly by hand or some cable-pushing device at the surface to impose a maximum load on the tool 10. It is, of course, impossible to impose further loading through the cable 13 onto the well tool 10 unless the cable is partially respooled onto the winch 14 and then the tool is again relowered in an attempt to gain sufficient momentum to pass the impediment.

It has been found, however, that in actual situations where a borehole, such as at 11, is substantially deviated, with ordinary suspension cables it has not been possible to get well tools as at 10 to intervals in the borehole beyond the uppermost highly-deviated portions thereof. On the other hand, by employing the new and improved methods of the present invention, a significant aid in facilitating the descent of these well tools isprovided by practicing the invention. Usually, by watching the recording instrument 22 connected to the logging device 12, an operator will be advised that the well tool 10 is beginning to slow. When this is notched, the winch 14 may be powered forwardly, as at 59, to begin driving the logging cable 13 to supplement to the gravitational and inertial forces moving the well tool 1 0 downwardly through the borehole 11. In this manner, by taking advantage of the motional inertia of the well tool 10, often the added impetus provided by positively driving the winch 14 to impose axial compressive forces on the moving well tool will be sufficient to force the tool along substantially-deviated or nonvertical intervals and on into more-vertical intervals therein.

Accordingly, it will be appreciated that the present invention has provided new and improved methods for facilitating the descent of well tools through highly-deviated well bores. Thus, although changes and modifications may be made in the principles of the invention as set out in the claims, by providing a relatively-stiff logging cable as well as the switching mechanism in the well tool, this well tool may be moved through even highly-deviated boreholes to greater depths than has heretofore been attainable.

lclaim:

l. A method for advancing a well tool disposed within a downwardlyinclined well bore interval and suspended therein from a cable having a laterally-stiffened lower portion coupled to the well tool and an upper portion extending therefrom through the well bore to the surface comprising the steps of:

moving said upper cable portion downwardly into the well bore to reduce tensile forces therein and develop downwardlyacting compressive forces in said lower cable portion for producing corresponding downwardly-acting forces on said well tool; and moving additional lengths of said cable from the surface into the well bore to produce additional downwardlyacting forces on said well tool for advancing said well tool further downwardly through the downwardly-inclined well bore interval.

2. A method for lowering a well tool suspended within a well bore from a cable having a laterally-stiffened lower portion coupled to the well tool and an upper portion extending therefrom through the well bore and operatively spooled on a powered winch at the surface comprising the steps of: unreeling said cable from said winch to lower said well tool into the well bore; measuring a characteristic representative of the descent of said well tool through the well bore; and, whenever said well slows its descent, powering said winch to unreeladditional lengths of said cable into the well bore for reducing tensile forces therein and developing compressive forces in said laterally-stiffened lower portion thereof to urge said .welltool on further through the well bore.

3. A method for logging a well bore having a nonvertical'interval therein comprising the steps of: dependently coupling a logging instrument to an electrical logging cable havingat least a lower portion thereof resistant to lateral bending and an upper portion thereof operatively spooled onto a powered winch adapted to be selectively driven forwardly and reversely for respectively lowering and raising said logging instrument into and out of a well bore to be logged; unspooling said cable from said winch to lower said logging instrument into a well bore to be logged; whenever the descent of said logging instrument is halted, driving said winch forwardly for reducing tensile forces in said upper cable portion and developingcompressive forces in said lower cable portion to move said logging instrument through nonvertical intervals of the well bore to greater depths therein; and, after said logging instrument has reached a selected well bore depth, driving said winch reversely to respool said cable back onto said winch for logging the well bore as said logging instrument is returned toward the surface.

4. A method for logging a well bore having a nonvertical interval therein comprising the steps of: dependently coupling a logging instrument to an electrical logging cable having a lower portion thereof resistant to lateral bending and an upper portion thereof operatively spooled onto a powered winch adapted to be selectively driven forwardly and reversely for respectively lowering and raising said logging instrument into and out of a well bore to be logged; unreeling said cable from said winch to lower said logging instrument into a well bore to be logged; whenever the descent of said logging instrument is slowed, driving said winch forwardly for reducing tensile forces in said upper cable portion and developing compressive forces in said lower cable portion to increase the speed of said logging instrument through nonvertical intervals of the well bore; and, after said logging instrument has reached a selected well bore depth, driving said winch reversely to reel said cable back onto said winch fore returning said logging instrument toward the surface.

5. A method for advancing well tool disposed within a downwardly-inclined well bore interval and suspended therein from a cable having a lower portion coupled to the well too] and an upper portion extending therefrom through the well bore to the surface comprising the steps of: moving said upper cable portion downwardly into the well bore to reduce tensile forces therein and develop downwardly-acting compressive forces in said lower cable portion for producing corresponding downwardly-acting forces on said well tool; measuring a characteristic indicative that said downwardly-acting forces are acting on said well tool; and, so long as said characteristic indicates that said downwardly-acting forces are acting on said well too], moving additional lengths of said cable from the surface into the well bore to produce additional downwardly-acting forces on said well tool for advancing said well tool further downwardly through the downwardly-inclined well bore interval.

6. A method for logging a well bore comprising the steps of: dependently coupling a logging instrument to the lower portion of an electrical logging cable adapted to resist lateral bending and having an upper portion thereof operatively spooled onto a powered winch adapted to be selectively driven forwardly and reversely for respectively lowering and raising said logging instrument into and out of a well bore to be logged; unreeling said cable from said winch to lower said logging instrument into a well bore to be logged; observing at the surface signals produced by said logging instrument for obtaining indications that said logging instrument is descending into the well bore; whenever said signals indicate that the descent of s aid logging instrument is slowed, driving said winch forwardly for reducing tensile forces in said upper cable portion and developing corresponding downwardly-acting compressive forces in said lower cable portion to move said logging instrument further downwardly in the well bore; and, after said logging instrument has reached a selected well bore depth, driving said winch reversely to respool said cable back onto said winch for returning said logging instrument toward the surface.

Patent No. 3,554 ,284 Dated January 12 1971 Horace A. Nystrom PAGE 1 Inventor(s) It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 2 line 20 after "shown) insert H by Column 3 line 10 after "acting" insert axial line 28 after "forces" insert if any, line 28 after "body" insert Conversely, when the downwardly acting forces on cylindrical body Column 5 line 47 after "occurred" inse a period. Column 6 line 9 "notched" should read noticed line 11 after "supplement" cancel "to"; line 52 after "well insert tool Column 8 after line 28 insert claims 7, 8, 9,10 and 11: a

7. A method for logging a well bore comprisinp, the

steps of: dependently coupling a logging instrument to an electrical loaning cable adapted to withstand axial compress forces without being bent double within the spatial limits of the well bore said cable being operatively spooled onto a powered winch adapted to be selectively driven forwardly and reversely for respectively lowering and raising said logging instrument into and out of a well bore to be logged;

unreeling said cable from said winch to lower said logging instrument into a well bore to be logged; observing at the surface logging signals produced by said logging; instrument for obtaining; indications that said logging instrument is descending into the well bore; whenever said logging signals indicate that the descent of said logging instrument is slov driving said winch forwardly for reducing tensile forces in said cable and developing corresponding compressive forces UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3 Dated January 12 1971 Inventor) Horace A. Nystrom Page 2 It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

in the lower portion thereof to facilitate the descent of said logging instrument through the well here; measuring a characteristic indicative that said compressive forces are acting on said logging instrument; and, so long as said characteristic indicates that said compressive forces are acting on said logging instrument and said logging signals indicate that said logging instrument is descending into the well bore continue driving said winch forwardly to carry said logging instrument to a selected well here depth 8. The method of Cit FYI? further including the step 01; after said logging instrument has reached said selecte well bore depth, driving said winch reversely to respool said cable back onto said winch for returning said logging instrument toward the surface.

9. The method of Claim 7 further including the step of: after said logging instrument has reached said selectr well here depth, driving said winch reversely to respool said cable back onto said winch for logging the well bore as said logging instrument is returned toward the surface I FORM PO-1050l10-69) UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION patent 3 ,554 ,284 Dated January 12 1971 Pa e 3 Inventor(s) Horace A Y m g It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

10. method for logging a well bore having a non vertical interval therein comprising the steps of: depen'der coupling a logging instrument to an electrical logging cable adapted to resist lateral flexing under compressive loading and operatively spooled onto a powered winch adapted to be selectively driven forwardly and reversely for respectively lowering and raising said logging instrument into and out 01 a well bore to be logged; unreeling said cable from said wir to lower said logging instrument into a well bore to be logg whenever the descent of said logging instrument is retarded driving said winch forwardly for reducing tensile forces in said cable; and forcing the upper portion of said cable downwardly for developing corresponding compressive forces the lower portion thereof to urge said logging instrument toward greater depths in said well bore UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Pa e 3 554 Date January 12 1971 H A. N lnventofls) orace ystrom Page 4 It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

ll. Ihe method of Claim 10 further including the ste of: aftersaid logging instrument has reached a selected well bore depth, driving said winch reversely to respool se cable back onto said winch for logging the well bore as sai logging; instrument is returned toward the surface.

Signed and sealed this 7th day of March 1972 (SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD M.FLETCHER,JR. ROBERT GOTTSCHALK Attesting Officer Commissioner of Pate

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Classifications
U.S. Classification166/254.2, 166/385
International ClassificationE21B23/00, E21B23/14
Cooperative ClassificationE21B23/14
European ClassificationE21B23/14