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Publication numberUS3554452 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 12, 1971
Filing dateSep 4, 1968
Priority dateSep 4, 1968
Publication numberUS 3554452 A, US 3554452A, US-A-3554452, US3554452 A, US3554452A
InventorsDavidson Kenneth H, Thompson William S
Original AssigneeSnorkel Fire Equipment Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hydraulically controlled nozzle
US 3554452 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] Inventors Kenneth B. Davidson St. Joseph, Mich.;

William S. Thompson, Elkhart, Ind. [21] Appl.No. 757,421 [22] Filed Sep 4, 1968 Jan. 13, 197 l Snorkel Fire Equipment Company a corporation of Missouri [45] Patented [73] Assignee [54] HYDRAULICALLY CONTROLLED NOZZLE 13 Claims, 9 Drawing Figs.

52 U.S.Cl 239/956,

169/24, 239/583 51 Int.Cl B05bl/32 50 FieldofSearch 169/24;

3,017,124 1/1962 Knight 3,253,677 5/1966 Krynytzkyetal 169/24 Primary Examiner-Lloyd L. King Assistant ExaminerGene A. Church Anamey-Dressler, Goldsmith, Clement & Gordon ABSTRACT: A nozzle, particularly adapted for use in fire fighting apparatus, including a first tubular member adapted to be connected to a source of fluid, a second tubular member mounted for axial sliding movement relative to the first tubular member, said first and second members having cooperating means thereon for regulating the flow of fluid through the nozzle, and a third tubular member mounted for axial sliding movement on the second tubular member, said third tubular member comprising means for regulating the pattern of flow emerging from the nozzle. Hydraulic means is providedfor moving the second member relative to the first member in both directions for increasing and decreasing the flow from the nozzle; and hydraulic means is also provided for moving the third member relative to the second member for both increasing and decreasing the angle of spray emerging from the nozzle.

PATENTEU JAN 1 2 l97| SHEET 1 BF 2 1 HYDRAULICALLY CONTROLLED NOZZLE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION One of the more recent innovations in the fire fighting equipment field has been the provision of an articulated boom structure on a pumper truck, or the like; with the boom structure including fluid delivery means for providing fluid to a nozzle structure carried at the end of the boom structure. Such apparatus is disclosed and claimed in Moore et al. Pat. No. 3,346,052, the disclosure of which is hereby incorporated by reference in the present application. One of the salient advantages of fire fighting structure, such as that disclosed in the Moore et al. patent, is that the nozzle can be controlled from a remote point removed from a fire, so that a fireman will not be endangered in combating a fire.

Heretofore, nozzles that, have been conventionally used in fire fighting apparatus have included means for controlling the flow of liquid through the nozzle, as well as means for controlling the angle of spray emerging from the nozzle. Conventionally, mechanical means have been provided for controlling both of these functions. Typical mechanical adjusting devices have not been satisfactory, because of their complexity, and because they have usually necessitated manual adjustments directly upon the nozzle itself closely adjacent to a fire.

To obviate the problems noted above in connection with manual adjustable nozzles, it has been proposed in the past to remotely control the flow and pattern functions of the nozzle, and in certain instances hydraulic means have been proposed for this purpose. However, heretofore, no one has beensuccessful in providing a commercially acceptable hydraulically controlled nozzle.

A typical prior art hydraulically controlled nozzle is illustrated in Nielsen U.S. Pat. No. 2,711,929. In the structure disclosed in the Nielsen patent, a first cylinder is provided on a nonle barrel, with a piston being movable in the cylinder and having means thereon, in the form of an integralsleeve, for controlling the pattern of spray emerging from the nozzle. Hydraulic fluid is utilized to move the piston in a first direction to decrease the angle of spray emerging from the nozzle, with a spring functioning to inove the piston in an opposite direction to increase the angle of spray emerging from the nozzle. The barrel of the nozzle disclosed in the Nielsen patent includes a second cylinder facing in a direction opposite to that of the first cylinder, and'a piston that is fixed relative to I the means supplying fluid to the nozzle is provided in the second cylinder; so that when hydraulic fluid is admitted to the second cylinder, the-barrel is moved outwardly of the piston therein. Cooperating flow regulating means are as-. sociated with the fixed piston and with the nozzle barrel, which modulate the flow of liquid through the nozzle. The spring that biases the first piston in a spray angle increasing direction also biases the nozzle barrel in a direction to increase the flow of fluid through the nozzle, with the admission of fluid into the second cylinder serving to move the nozzle in a flow decreasing direction.

The structure disclosed in the above mentioned Nielsen patent has several disadvantages, not the least of which is a complicated structural arrangement for providing the op positely facing cylinders on the nozzle barrel and the pistons that work in the cylinders. However, the most serious disadvantage of the nozzle structure disclosed in the Nielsen patent is the provision of an outboard spring for biasing the nozzle barrel and the pattern controlling sleeve that is movable relative to the nozzle barrel. Because of its outboard mounting, the spring is vulnerable to adverse conditions; e.g., during extremely cold weather, the spring is subject to have ice form thereon. The spring is subject to blockage and thus does not provide a reliable moving force. The spring is also subject to fatigue, and thus does not function satisfactorily for an extended period of use. For these and other reasons, hydraulically controlled noules of the type disclosed in the Nielsen patent have not met with commercial acceptance.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The nozzle of the present invention is similar to that disclosed in the above mentioned Nielsen patent, to the extend that it provides hydraulically actuated means for controlling flow of fluid through the nozzle, as well as hydraulically actuated means for controlling the pattern of spray emerging from the nozzle. However, the nozzle of the present invention represents a significant departure from the arrangement disclosed in the Nielsen patent in that it provides an extremely simplified structural arrangement that functions in a manner vastly superior to the structure disclosed in the Nielsen patent. To this, end, applicants have not only completely eliminated the need for any mechanical adjustment upon the nozzle itself to vary flow and pattern, but also have eliminated the use of any springs for biasing any of the movable nozzle elements in one direction or the other. The novel structure of the present invention provides hydraulically actuated means for moving flow controlling means in both flow increasing and flow decreasing directions, and hydraulically actuated means for moving the pattern controlling means in spray angle increasing and decreasing directions, so that the necessity of providing springs for at least one of these functions is eliminated.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is'a side elevational view of a pumper truck, with the articulated boom structure and fluid delivery nozzle thereon being illustrated in a stored position;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged top plan view of the nozzle of the present invention; l I

FIG. 3 is a central sectionview of the nozzle; and

FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 3, with the movable nozzle elements in a different position.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT While this invention is susceptible of embodiment in many different forms, there is shown in the drawings and will herein be'described in detail one specific embodiment, with the understanding that the present disclosure is to be considered as an exemplification of the principles of the invention and is not intended to limit the invention to the embodiment illustrated. The scope of the invention will be pointed out in the appended claims,

The structure of the present invention has particular utility in combination with a motive vehicle, such as the pumper truck illustrated generally at 10 in FIG. I. More specifically, the structure of the present invention has particular utility in combination with a pumper truck 10 of the type having an articulated boom structure 11, such as that disclosed in the boom section 12 that is articulatd to a second boom section 13, which has a fluid controlling monitor assembly 14 and a fluid directing nozzle assembly 15 at the outer end thereof. As is described in detail in the Moore et al. patent, the boom sections 12 and 13 include fluid delivery means 16 (such as internal channels) for providing a fluid, such as water. at the nozzle 15. A suitable connector 17 establishes fluid tight communication between the fluid delivery means 16 and the nozzle 15.

The nozzle 15 includes a first tubular member 18 that extends forwardly from connector 17. Member 18 is provided with a rearwardly facing annular shoulder 19 on the outer surface thereof, adjacent the' rearward end of the member. Member 18 is also provided with a forwardly facing shoulder 20 on the outer surface thereof, forwardly of shoulder 1a. A spider structure 21 extends inwardly from the inner surface of member 18 intermediate the ends thereof, and the spider structure terminates in a tubular sleeve 22 centered within the member 18. A valve stem 24 is mounted at a fixed location with respect to member 18, and to this end, member 24 has a rearward end 26 of reduced diameter to provide a rearwardly facing transverse shoulder 25 that butts against the forwardly facing end of sleeve 22. Valve stern portion 26 is externally threaded, and a nut 27 is screwed thereon and against the rearward end of sleeve 22 to fixedly mount the valve stem within the member 18. The forward end 28 of valve stem 24 extends outwardly from the forward end of member 18 and is diametrically enlarged to provide a part of a fluid flow control means, as will hereafter appear.

Nozzle includes a second tubular member 29 that is telescopically mounted for axial sliding movement relative to member 18. ln the exemplary form of the invention illustrated herein, member 29 is formed of two separate sections, i.e., a rearward section 30 and a forward section 31. As will become apparent from the ensuing description, the present invention contemplates that member 29 may be a single unitary member, although the two section arrangement is preferred for ease of assembly.

Sections 30 and 31 are both tubular elements, with the inner surface of the forward end of member 30 being internally threaded at 32, and with the outer surface of the rearward end of member 31 being externally threaded at 33. The inner surface of section 30 rearwardly of threaded portion 32 is positioned in sliding engagement with the outer surfaceof member 18 between shoulders 19 and 20, and the inner surface of section 31 is positioned in sliding engagement with the outer surface of the reduced diameter portion of member 18 forwardly of shoulder 20.

The inner surface of section 30 is provided with a forwardly facing shoulder 34 adjacent the rearward end thereof, with the shoulder 34 being positioned in opposed and axially spaced relationship with respect to the shoulder 19 on member l8to define an annular chamber 35 therebetween. A boss 37 extends laterally outwardly from the rearward end of section 30, and is internally threaded at 38 for reception of an elbow 39. A bore 36 extends through the bottom of boss 37 into chamber 35 for establishing communication with a source of fluid under pressure and the chamber. As will be explained in detail hereinafter, when fluid under pressure is admitted into chamber 35, member'29 is moved rearwardly, or to the left as viewed in FIGS. 14, relative to member 18.

The inner surface of the rearward endof section 31 is pro vided with a portion 40 of enlarged diameter. The forward end of portion 40 terminates in an inclined, generally rearwardly facing shoulder 41 which is spaced from and positioned in generally opposed relationship with respect to the shoulder 20 on member 18. An annular chamber 42 is provided between shoulder 20 and the rearward end portion 31a of section 31 and inclined surface 41. One or more bores 43 extend through the side wall of section 31 to establish communication between chamber 42 and a source of fluid under pressure, as will hereinafter appear. When fluid under pressure is admitted to chamber 42, member 29 is moved forwardly or to the right, as viewed in FIGS. 24.

The forward end of section 31 includes an inwardly extending portion 44 of reduced diameter, and a flared portion 440 extends forwardly and outwardly from portion 44. The forwardmost end 28 of valve stem 24 constitutes a head or baffle which is larger in diameter than the bore of the reduced portion 44 of section 31, and the flared portion 44a and the valve stem head 28 cooperate to provide annular passage means 45 for controlling the flow of fluid through the nozzle 15. In the forwardmost position of the member 29 (FIG. 4), the head 28 of the valve stem 24 is spaced slightly from the flared surface 440 reduce flow through the nozzle, although in modified structures, themember 29 may be adjusted to a position to completely close off flow. In the rearmost position of member 29 (FIG. 3), surface 440 is spaced a substantial distance from valve stem head 28 to accommodate the flow of a large volume of fluid through the nozzle. For example, assuming a generally constant pressure of 80 p.s.i.,the minimum flow rate would be 300 gpm and the maximum flow rate would be 1000 gpm. As will hereinafter appear, member 29 can be selectively positioned between the locations of FIGS. 3 and 4 to provide a I desired flow rate, consistent with operating requirements and .1 Inna: banna amt m-peeum available.

Nozzle 15 includes a third tubular member 47 that is telescopically mounted upon member 29 for movement axially thereof. Member 47 includes a generally cylindrically shaped inner bore 47a that cooperates with the flared surface 440 on section 31 and. with the valve stem end 28 to control the pattern of fluid spray emerging from the nozzle 15 Member 47 is counterbored to provide a forwardly facing shoulder 48 on the inner surface thereof, which cooperateswith a rearwardly facing shoulder 46 on the outer surface of section 31 adjacent the forward end thereof to define an annular chamber 49 therebetween. A boss 52 extends laterally outwardly from member 47, and includes an internally threaded bore 53 for reception of an elbow 54. A bore 50 extends through the base of boss 52 to establish communication between a source of fluid under pressure and chamber 49 for moving member 47 rearwardly, to the left, as viewed inFlGS. 2-4, to increase the angle of spray emerging from the nozzle 15. In the rearwardmost position of member 47, a wide angle fog spray emerges from nozzle 15. i

The inner surface of member 47 rearwardly of shoulder 48 is positioned in sliding engagement with the outer surface of section 31, and provides a rearwardly facing shoulder 55, that is spaced from the forward end 56 of section 30 to define an annular chamber 57 therebetween. A bore 58 extends through the side wall of member 47 adjacent the rearward end thereof to establish communication between a source of fluid under pressure and chamber 57. A boss 59 extends laterally outwardly from member 47 in alignment with bore 58, and boss 59 includes an internally threaded bore 60 having anelbow 61 received therein. When fluid under pressureis 'admitted into chamber 57, member 47 is moved to the right relative to member 29 to decrease the angle of flow emerging from the nozzle 15. In the forwardmost position of member 47, a substantially straight stream emerges from the nozzle.

The means for controlling the admission of fluid into chamber 35, 42, 49 and 57 includes'a pair of solenoid actuated four-way, three-position valves 62' and 63, with springs biasing the operating spools of the valves toward the center or neutral position. The three positions of the valves 62 and 63 are referred to by the letters a, b and c," and as can be seen in FIG. 3, the valves 62 and 63 are connected in a suitable hydraulic circuit that includes pumping means (not shown) for providing hydraulic fluid at a suitable pressure, as for example 500 p.s.i.g. The fluid under pressure is provided to valves 62 and 63 through a line 67, and a line 64 connects one port of valve 62 to chamber 35, while a connecting line 68 connects a furtherport of valve 62'to a further line 66, which establishes communication to chamber 42 and 57 jointly. An exhaust port of valve 62 is connected to tank T by line 69. in a like manner, a line 65 establishes communication between a port of valve 63 and chamber 49, while line 66 establishes communication between a further port of valve 63 and chamber 42 and 57 jointly. A further line 70 connects the exhaust port of valve 63 to tank T via line 69. As is evident from FIGS. 14, suitable seals, such as O-rings are provided in recessed portions of members 18, 29 and 47 so that the chambers are fluid tight.

In order to control the flow of fluid from nozzle 15, the sole noid associated with valve 62 is energized to select either the a or c" position. When the valve 62 is in the a position, fluid under pressure is admitted into chamber 35 through line 64 to move member 29 to the left, thereby increasing the spacing between flared surface 45a and valve head 28 to increase the flow from the nozzle 15. At the same time, fluid flows from chamber 42, through bore 43, chamber '57, line 66, and to tank T through line 69. In the c position of valve 62, fluid under pressure is admitted to chamber 42 through lines 68 and 66, chamber 57 and bore 43, to move member 29 to the right to thereby decrease the flow from the nozzle. When the desired position of the member 29 has been selected, the valve controlling solenoid is deenergized, and the spring associated with the valve centers the valve in the neutral position to block flow to the chamber 35 and 42.

When it is desired to vary the pattern of flow emerging from the nozzle 15, the solenoid associated with valve 63 is energized to select either the a" or c" position. In the a' position, fluid under pressure is admitted into chamber 49 through line 65 to move mem er 47 to the left and thereby increase the angle of spray emerging from the nozzle. At the same time, fluid passes from chamber 57 through line 66, 68, 70 and 69 to tank T. When the valve 63 is in the c'position, fluid under pressure is admitted to chamber 57 through line 66 to move member 47 to the right to decrease the angle of spray emerging from the nozzle, while at the same time fluid is returned to tank T from chamber 49 through line 65,70 and 69.

I claim:

1. A hydraulically operated, remotely controllable nozzle comprising: a tubular structure having a fluid inlet and a fluid outlet, flow control means having a tubular section and movable in a first direction for increasing the flow rate through said outlet and movable in a second direction for decreasing the flow rate through said outlet, remotely operable hydraulically actuated means for moving said flow control means in both of said directions, pattern control means having a tubular section and movable in a first direction for increasing the angle of spray emerging from said outlet and movable in a second direction for decreasing the angle of spray emerging from said outlet, and remotely operable hydraulically actuated means for moving said pattern control means in both directions, said remotely operable hydraulically actuated means being operable independently to change the flow rate without affecting the angle of spray, and vice versa, said tubular sections being concentric and being axially movable with respect to each other.

2. A nozzle as set forth in claim 1 including first valve means for controlling the means for moving said flow control means and second valve means for controlling the means for moving said pattern control means.

3. A nozzle as set forth in claim 1 in which a valve member is carried by said tubular structure, said flow control means including means defining an annular valve seat cooperating with said valve member to control the quantity of flow through said outlet; and wherein movement of said flow control means shifts said valve seat relative to said valve member.

4. A nozzle as set forth in claim 3 in which said pattern control means tubular section is a tubular sleeve mounted for movement axially of said tubular structure outwardly of said valve seat.

5. A nozzle comprising: a first tubular member having means for connecting the member to a source of liquid under pressure; a second tubular member mounted for axial movement relative to said first member; cooperating flow controlling means on said first and second members for varying the flow of liquid through said nonle in response to movement of said second member relative to said first member; means on said first and second members defining a first chamber; means for establishing communication between a source of fluid under pressure and said first chamber for moving said second member in a flow increasing direction; means on said first and second members defining a second chamber; means for estab ishing communication between a source of fluid under pressure and said second chamber for moving said second member in a flow decreasing direction; a third tubular member mounted for axial movement relative to said second member for varying the pattern of flow emerging from said nozzle; means on said second and third members defining a third chamber; means for establishing communication.

between a source of fluid under pressure and said third chamber for moving said third member in a direction to decrease the angle of spray emerging from said nozzle; means on said second and third members defining a fourth chamber; and means for establishing communication between a source of fluid under pressure and said fourth chamber for moving said third member in a direction to increase the angle of spray emerging from said nozzle. v

6. nozzle as set forth in claim 5 wherein said second tubular member is mounted telescopically outwardly of said first tubular member, said first and second members having opposed annular shoulders thereon defining said first chamber therebetween.

7. A nozzle as set forth in claim 5 wherein said third tubular member is mounted telescopically outwardly of said second tubular member, said second and third members having opposed annular shoulders thereon defining said third chamber therebetween.

8. A nozzle as set forth in claim 5 wherein said second and third chambers are in communication with one another.

9. A nozzle as set forth in claim 5 wherein said second tubular member is mounted telescopically outwardly of said first tubular member, said first and second members having opposed annular shoulders therein defining said second chamber therebetween.

10. A nozzle as set forth in claim 5 wherein said third tubular member is mounted telescopically outwardly of said second tubular member, said second and third members having opposed annular shoulders therein defining said fourth chamber therebetween.

11. For use witha fire fighting apparatus having a boom structure, and a fluid delivery means associated with said boom structure, an improved nozzle at theend of said boom structure and having a fluid inlet communicating with said fluid delivery means and a fluid outlet, said nozzle having flow control means having a tubular section and movable in a first direction for increasing the flow rate through said outlet and movable in a a second direction for decreasing the flow rate through said outlet, remotely operable hydraulically actuated means for moving said flow control means in both of said directions, said nozzle having pattern control means having a tubular section and movable in a first direction for increasing the angle of spray emerging from said outlet and movable in a second direction for decreasing the angle of spray emerging from said outlet, and remotely operable hydraulically actuated means for moving said pattern control means in both directions, said remotely operable hydraulically actuated means being operable independently to change the flow rate without affecting the angle of spray, and vice versa, said tubular sections being concentric and being axially movable with respect to each other.

l2. Firefighting apparatus as set forth in claim 11 wherein said boom structure includes first and second articulated boom sections mounted for movement relative to one another.

13. Fire fighting apparatus as set forth'in claim 12 wherein said boom sections are carried upon a motive vehicle.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2988289 *Jul 22, 1958Jun 13, 1961Elkhart Brass Mfg CoHydraulically operated fog nozzle
US3017124 *May 23, 1958Jan 16, 1962Chiksan CoFluid discharge nozzle
US3256677 *Feb 5, 1965Jun 21, 1966Mixing Equipment Co IncDefoaming
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3771605 *Nov 14, 1972Nov 13, 1973Bergomi SpaFire fighting apparatus
US3860176 *Apr 12, 1974Jan 14, 1975Chubb Fire Security LtdFire-fighting branch pipe nozzles
US4007793 *Aug 25, 1975Feb 15, 1977Hux Fred MFire fighting apparatus
US4342426 *Sep 24, 1980Aug 3, 1982Feecon CorporationNozzle
US4949794 *May 31, 1988Aug 21, 1990Premier Industrial CorporationRemotely controlled firefighting apparatus and control means
US6547166Aug 11, 2000Apr 15, 2003L.R. Nelson CorporationPattern adjustable flow nozzle
US6749027 *Sep 25, 1998Jun 15, 2004Dennis W. CrabtreeFire fighting nozzle and method including pressure regulation, chemical and education features
WO2008032280A2 *Sep 13, 2007Mar 20, 2008Spartan Motors IncVehicle mounted fire and rescue boom
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/456, 239/583, 169/24
International ClassificationB05B1/30, B05B1/12, A62C31/00, A62C31/02, B05B1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA62C31/02, B05B1/12, B05B1/3073
European ClassificationB05B1/12, A62C31/02, B05B1/30D2
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 10, 2006ASAssignment
Owner name: PATRIARCH PARTNERS AGENCY SERVICES, LLC, NORTH CAR
Free format text: PATENT COLLATERAL SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:AMERICAN LAFRANCE, LLC;REEL/FRAME:017154/0385
Effective date: 20051214
Dec 28, 2005ASAssignment
Owner name: AMERICAN LAFRANCE, LLC, SOUTH CAROLINA
Free format text: PATENT ASSIGNMENT AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:LADDER TOWERS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:016945/0245
Effective date: 20051214
Jan 11, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: ECONOMY ENGINEERING COMPANY, A CORP. OF ILLINOIS,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:FIGGIE INTERNATIONAL INC.;REEL/FRAME:005017/0956
Effective date: 19890106
Jan 11, 1989AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: ECONOMY ENGINEERING COMPANY, P.O. BOX 65, STOCKYAR
Owner name: FIGGIE INTERNATIONAL INC.
Effective date: 19890106
Mar 25, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: FIGGIE INTERNATIONAL INC.
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:FIGGIE INTERNATIONAL INC., (MERGED INTO) FIGGIE INTERNATIONAL HOLDINGS INC. (CHANGED TO);REEL/FRAME:004767/0822
Effective date: 19870323