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Publication numberUS3556274 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 19, 1971
Filing dateAug 16, 1968
Priority dateAug 23, 1967
Also published asDE1774712A1, DE1774712B2, DE1774712C3
Publication numberUS 3556274 A, US 3556274A, US-A-3556274, US3556274 A, US3556274A
InventorsAsada Takeo, Mizuta Yukio, Tanaka Toshio
Original AssigneeOmron Tateisi Electronics Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic ticket gate
US 3556274 A
Images(5)
Previous page
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [72] lnventors Yukio Mizuta;

Toshio Tanaka; Takeo Asada, Kyoto, Japan 211 App1.No. 753,196

[54] AUTOMATIC TICKET GATE 10 Claims, 12 Drawing Figs.

521 u.s.c1 194 4,

209/74,209/75,209/111.s 51 Int.Cl G07f17/00 501 FieldofSearch 234/25,40,

59, 62, 63, 89; 235/31, 93; 346/(Inquired); 194/4; 209/72-74, 75, 111.7, 111.8

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,270,882 9/1966 Perotto 209/74 3,339,693 9/1967 Mueller 194/4 3,362,515 1/1968 Yamamoto 194/4 3,426,879 2/1969 Walker 194/4 Primary Examiner-RichardA. Schacher Att0rneyChristensen, Sanborn and Matthews ABSTRACT: An automatic ticket gate which can handle both ordinary tickets and commutation tickets. The ticket gate of the invention is provided with a single ticket inlet in which both kinds of tickets are inserted for examination of their validity, and two outlets, one for ordinary tickets and the other for commutation tickets to be delivered out. The ticket inserted into the inlet is conveyed through the interior mechanism of the gate and while it is being conveyed, the information previously recorded on the ticket is read and checked with respect to its validity, and then directed to one of the two outlets in accordance with its kind so as to project therethrough. The ticket gate, when used as an entrance gate, is provided with means for punching ordinary tickets to be returned to the passengers, and when used as an exit gate, it is provided with means for storing ordinary tickets not to be returned to the passengers.

AUTOMATIC TICKET GATE BACKGROUND AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Automatic ticket gates are in increasing use at railway stations and the like. Generally, there are two kinds of transportation tickets, that is, ordinary tickets which can be used only once and commutation or season tickets which can be repeatedly used for a predetermined period of time. In order to automatically examine these two kinds of tickets, it would be necessary to provide a gate for ordinary tickets and a separate gate for commutation tickets. During morning or evening rush hours, however,'passengcrs swarm around the commutation ticket gate while the ordinary ticket gate stands idle. On the contrary, during the rest of the day, the ordinary ticket gate is more crowded than the commutation ticket gate. This reduces the average passage efficiency of the the gates and certainly is uneconomical.

Accordingly, the primary object of the invention is to provide an automatic ticket gate which is capable of examining both kinds of tickets. The ticket gate .of the invention is provided with a single ticket inlet through which both kinds of tickets are inserted into the gate. This arrangement certainly is convenient to passengers, for if there were two ticket inlets, passengers would have to choose between them in accordance with the kind of the tickets they have. The tickets introduced into the inlet are conveyed through the interior mechanism of the gate by means of common conveying means, and as they are conveyed, the informations they have areread by common reading means. The provision of the common conveying .means and ticket information reading means for two different kinds of tickets makes the apparatus more compact in size and easier in manufacture and maintenance and lower in cost than if if it were provided with two such means individually for the two kinds of tickets.

The tickets introduced through the single inlet,-however, are delivered out through two different outlets in accordance with their kinds. That is, the ordinary tickets are through one outlet and the commutation tickets, through a different outlet. This arrangement not only is very convenient to the passengers, who find it easier to pick up their own tickets, but also increases the passage efficiency of the gate. t

The ticket gate of the invention, when uses as an entrance gate, is provided with means for punching or clipping valid ordinary tickets before they are returned to their owners. The punching means is rendered inoperative when the ticket inserted is a commutation ticket.

When the ticket is delivered out of either. of the two outlets, it stands upright so that the passenger can easily pick it up. To this end, the ticket is conveyed through the interior mechanism of the gate while standing upright on its one edge and appears at either of the outlets as it stands upright. The ticket may lie flat while it is being conveyed through the interior mechanism of the gate, but it is caused to stand upright when it comes out.

The invention, with its features and advantages, will become more apparent from the following description of preferred embodiments thereof with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference numerals denote like parts, and wherein:

FIG. I is a schematic top plan view of an automatic ticket gate embodying the invention; 7

FIG. 2 is a schematic side view of one of the gateway defining structures shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a schematic view of a commutation ticket used in the ticket gate of FIG. 1, illustrating how th information on the ticket is read by a ticket information reader;

FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 3, but showing an ordinary ticket;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged top plan view [of the interior mechanism of the structure shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 6 is a side view of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a block diagram of the electrical control of the mechanism of FIGS. 5 and 6;

FIG. 8 is a schematic top plan view of another embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 9 is an enlarged side view of the interior mechanism of one of the gateway defining structures shown in FIG. 8;

FIGS. 10 and II are side views of modified forms ofa portion of FIG. 9; and

FlG.l2 is a block diagram of a portion of FIG. 7 so modified as to be suitable for control of the mechanisms shown in FIGS. 8-ll.

Referring now in detail to the drawings, first to FIG. I, there are shown a pair of elongated structures 10 and 20 laterally spaced apart to define a gateway 30 thercbetween. Passengers pass through the gateway 30 in the direction of an arrow 32. The structure 10, which is at the right-hand side of the gateway as passengers move in the direction of the arrow 32, is provided with three slots ll, 12 and 13 on the upper surface of the structure and also a fourth slot I4 (FIG. 2) on the side panel thereof facing the gateway. The slot II at the entrance of the gateway is the one into which passengers insert their tickets as they enter the gate; the slot II at the exit side of the gateway is the one from which the commutation tickets that have been inserted into the slot ll are delivered out; and the other slot I3 at the exit side is the one from which the ordinary tickets that have been inserted into the slot II are delivered out. The lateral slot I4 is the one through which invalid tickets are delivered out,

When a passenger enters the gate, he puts into the slot ll his ticket holding it upright. The ticket is conveyed inside the structure 10 toward the exit side thereof, during which course the ticket is checked with respect to its validity. If the ticket is found false, it is sent out of the slot 14. If it is valid, it is sent out of the slot I2 in case it is an ordinary ticket and out of the slot 13 in case it is a commutation ticket. At the same time a pair of gate bars 15 and 25 open the gateway for the passenger to pass therethrough. The gate bars normally project from the opposed inner lateral walls of the structures I0 and 20 thereby to close the gateway. When they are opened, they are retracted into the lateral walls, as shown in FIG. 2. A passage detector 31 is provided so as to be stepped on by the passenger at the exit end of the gateway. When the'detector is stepped on, the gate bars 15 and 25 again close the gateway after the passenger. The arrangement may also be such a that the bars 15 and 20 are normally kept open and closed only when a false ticket has been detected.

Turning to FIG. 3, a commutation ticket 40 of a rectangular shape is shown. On one surface of the ticket there are recorded a plurality of shift code marks 41 and information code marks 42 arranged in parallel rows along one of the longer edges or sides of the ticket. Along the opposite side or edge thereof and symmetrically with the marks 41 and 42 there are recorded a plurality of shift code marks 43 and information code marks 44 which are equivalent to the marks 41 and 42, respectively. The reason for the dual provision and symmetrical arrangement of the code marks is that the information on the ticket can be read even when the ticket is inserted into the slot in either of the opposite directions, that is, turned upside down or with the rear (right-hand) edge of the ticket forward, in FIG. 5. The code marks may be recorded in magnetic ink so that they may be read by a magnetic reading heads such as commonly used in a tape recorder. The information recorded includes the kind of ticket (whether it is an ordinary ticket or commutation ticket), the period of availability,

the range of journey allowable, etc.

FIG. 4 shows an ordinary ticket 50, the longer edges of which are longer than the shorter edges of the commutation ticket shown in FIG. 3, so that, with the length of the ticket inlet slot ll being a slightly longer than the shorter edges of the commutation ticket, the ordinary ticket can be inserted thereinto only with either of its shorter edges forward, thereby limiting the manner of inserting the tickets into the inlet slot II.

The ordinary ticket 50 has a plurality of shift code marks 51 and information code mark 52 printed, say, in magnetic ink along the length of the ticket. The information recorded by the marks 52 includes the kind of the ticket, the name of the station where the ticket has been issued, the period of availability, the range ofjourney allowable, etc.

As will be described in detail later, these two kinds oftickets are conveyed through the interior mechanism of the gate structure by the same conveyor means, as and as they are conveyed, their informations are read by the same information reader. As shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. inside the structure 10. the ticket 40 or 50 has its one longer edge slidably supported and guided by a lower guide member 191 as it is moved in the direction of an arrow 70 past a ticket information reader 60 having two reading heads, one 61 for reading shift code marks and the other 62 for reading the information code marks. On the tickets 40 and 50, the code marks must be so positioned that the shift code marks 41, 43 or 51 are read by the reading head 61 and the information code marks 42, 44 and 52 by the head 62.

Turning to FIG. 5, the ticket inlet slot ll is so dimensioned that the ticket 40 or 50 is inserted upright into the slot II with one longer edge thereof in sliding contact with the upper sur face 101 of the structure 10. Inside the slot II, a light source 81 faces a photosensor 91 so that the ticket inserted into the slot ll interrupts the light entered the photosensor, whereby the insertion of the ticket is detected. Beyond the photosensor 91 there is provide a take-in roller section generally designated by 110, which comprises a drive roller 116 and a free roller 111 in frictional contact with the drive roller and mounted by a pin 112 onto a lever 114 which is pivotable about a pin 113. The lever 114 is biased by a spring 115 so as to press the roller 111 against the roller 116. Thus, the ticket inserted into the slot II has its forward end nipped by the rollers 116 and 111 so as to be drawn in and transferred onto an endless conveyor belt 132 running between a drive pulley 131 and a free pulley 133. A parallel pair of lateral guide rails 151 and 152 are provided above and along the conveyor belt 132 to prevent the ticket thereon from falling down. Above the guide rails a lever 162 is pivotable about a pin 161, with its outer free end gravitating to touch on the upper longer edge of the ticket so that the lower longer edge thereof touches the surface of the belt 132 without fail. Presently, the ticket reaches a transfer roller section 120 comprising three pairs of rollers 121, 122 and 123 arranged in the order mentioned, each pair being of the same construction as the previously mentioned take-in roller section. Between the first and second pairs 121 and 122 there are provided an opposed pair of magnetic heads 171 and 172. These heads are of the same construction and adapted to magnify the magnetic force of the already recorded code marks on the ticket.

The ticket may be inserted into the inlet slot II in four different manners, that is, with its one shorter edge forward or the opposite shorter edge forward and in either case, with its one surface turned reverse. The two magnetic heads 171 and 172 are arranged so as to work in whichever of the four man ners the ticket may have been inserted into the slot. Between the second and third pairs of rollers 122 and 123, there are provided an opposed pair of magnetic reading heads 181 and 182 which correspond to the reading head 60 previously described with reference to FIGS, 3 and 4. A support plate 191 extends between the first and third pairs of rollers 121 and 123 to bridge between the endless belt 132 and an endless belt 142. the latter running between a drive pulley 141 and a free pulley 143. An upper guide rail 157 extends over the paired rollers 121-123 and about half the length of the conveyor belt 142. The guide rail 157 is spaced above the surfaces of the support plate 191 and the conveyor belt 142 a distance just a little greater than the length of the shorter side of the commutation ticket, so that the lower longer edge thereof is always in secure contact with the support plate 191 and the conveyor belt 142. A parallel pair of lateral guide rails 153 and 154 are also provided above the conveyor belt 142 to prevent the ticket thereon from falling down.

The ticket that has been transferred onto the belt 142 interrupts the light being projected by a light source 84 onto a photosensor 94, whereby the passage of the ticket is detected. Presently, the ticket arrives at a shunting section 200 comprising a solenoid 201, a plunger 202 and a shunting bar 203 secured to the outer end of the plunger 202. When the solenoid 201 is energized, the plunger 202 moves the shunting bar 203 across the conveyor belt 142 under the lateral guide rail 153. thereby pushing the ticket from on the belt 142 across the opposite lateral guide rail 154 into a space 204, so that the ticket gravitages in the space 204 finally to appear at the slot 14 (FIG. 2).

Spaced a distance a little greater than the length of the longer side of the commutation ticket from the photosensor 94, there is provided a ticket puncher or clipper 220 having a stationary blade 226 and a movable blade 224. The former blade is U-shaped while the latter is L-shaped, so that the bent end 225 of the movable blade 224 engages in between the two legs of the stationary blade 226. To this end, the movable blade is mounted on a plunger 222 adapted to be pulled by a spring 224 to extend across the conveyor belt 142 thereby to arrest the ticket being conveyed on the conveyor belt. A solenoid 221, when energized, pulls in the plunger 222 so that the blade end 225 engages in the stationary blade 226 thereby cutting off a square portion at the forward shorter edge of the ticket that has been stopped by the blade end 225. If it is a commutation ticket, however, the solenoid 221 is kept energized to keep the movable blade end 225 out of the way of the ticket being conveyed on the belt 142, so that the commutation ticket can freely pass the puncher.

The ticket is further conveyed on the belt, being supported by an opposed pair of guide rails 155 and 156. If it is an ordinary ticket, it is carried as far as the outlet slot 13, where it is stopped by a stopper 233. Inside the slot 13 a light source 83 projects light onto a photosensor 93. The light is interrupted by the ticket, whereby the presence of the ticket in the slot 13 is detected. If it is a commutation ticket, it is stopped by a stopper 232 to stay in the slot 12 and does not arrive at the slot 13. Inside the slot 12 a light source 82 projects light onto a photosensor 92. The light is intercepted by the commutation ticket, whereby the presence of the ticket is detected. In It is clearly seen from FIG. 6 that the stopper 233, the light source 82 and the photosensor 92 are positioned at a higher level than the height, that is, the length of the shorter sides of ordinary tickets so that these tickets cannot be arrested by the stopper 232 nor do they intercept the light entering the photosensor 92.

Turning to FIG. 7 which shows an electrical control of the mechanism shown in FIGS. 5 and 6. A drive motor 230 is always rotating and when a ticket 40 or 50 has been inserted into the inlet slot II, a drive connection is established by means of a clutch 231 between the motor 230 and the previously mentioned drive rollers and pulleys. The photosensor 91 in the inlet slot II is such that when the incident light is interrupted, it produces an output, which is applied to a differentiator 241 and an OR element 302. The output from the differentiator is applied as a set input to a flip-flop 251, the set output from which is in turn applied to a relay 271 through an amplifier 261. The relay 271 has normally open contact 281 connected in series with the electromagnetic clutch 231 between a pair of supply lines 291 and 292, so that when the contact 281 is closed, the clutch 231 is actuated to establish the above-mentioned drive connection between the motor 230 and the drive rollers and pulleys. The relay 271 has another normally open contact 281 connected in series with the magnetic recording heads 171 and 172 (see also FIGS. 5 and 6) between the lines 291 and 292, so that when the contract 281 is closed, the heads operate.

As the ticket passes the reading heads 181, 182, the heads read the information on the ticket and produce a corresponding output signal, which is applied to a collation circuit 300, such as disclosed in pending U.S. Ser. No. 672,324 filed Oct. 2, I967. The collation circuit checks the ticket information with respect to its kind and validity. If the ticket has been found a valid ordinary ticket, the circuit 300 produces an output on a line 322; if it has been found an invalid ordinary ticket, the circuit produces an output on a line 321. lf the ticket has been found a valid commutation ticket, the circuit 300 produces an output on a line 324; and if it is found an invalid commutation ticket, the circuit 300 produces an output ona line 323. The signals on the lines 321 and 323 are applied through an OR element 303 to one input on an AND element 312, and the signal on the line is applied as one input to an AND element 313; and the signal on the line 324, as one input to an AND element 314.

The ticket that has passed the reading heads 181 and 182 is transferred onto the second conveyor belt 142, and intercepts the light from the light source 84 and then passes the source, whereupon the light therefrom enters the photosensor 94 again. The photosensor 94 is so designed as to produce an output when it receives no light. The output is applied to a NOT element 315. When the ticket passes the photosensor 84, the output therefrom disappears, so that the NOT element 315 produces an output, which is applied to a differentiator 243, the output from which is applied as the other input to the above-mentioned AND elements 3l2-314.

The output from the AND element 312, which is produced when the ticket has been recognized as invalid and when the ticket has passed the photosensor 94, as previously mentioned, is applied to a monostable circuit 252, which produces a set output for a sufficient period of time to completely operate the shunting bar 203. Presently, the monostable circuit 252 is reset to produce a reset output to be applied to a differentiator 242, the output from which is applied as a reset input to the flip-flop 251.

The set output from the monostable circuit 252 is applied to a relay 272 through an amplifier 262. The relay has a normally open contact 282 connected in series with the solenoid 201 (F168. 5 and 6) between the supply lines 291 and 292. When the relay 272 is energized, the contact 282 is closed to energize the solenoid 201, thereby projecting the shunting bar 203 across the conveyor belt 142, so that the ticket thereon will drop through the space 204 finally to be delivered out of the slot 14. After the predetermined period of time, the monostable circuit 252 is restored to a reset condition, whereupon the relay 272 is deenergized and the shunting bar 203 is returned to its original position as shown in FIG. 5. When reset, the monostable circuit 252 produces a reset output, which is applied to the differentiator 242, the output from which is applied as a reset input to the flip-flop 251 through an OR element 301.

When the ticket has been found a valid ordinary ticket, a signal appears on the line 322, so that the AND element 313 is ready to be actuated. Under this condition, when the ticket has passed the light source 84 to cause the light therefrom to enter the photosensor 94 again, the differentiator 243 produces an output to be applied as the other input to the AND element 313, whereupon the AND element 313 produces an output. This signal is applied to a monostable circuit 253 and also as a set input to a flip-flop 254. The monostable circuit 253 is such that when the AND element 313 applies its output to the circuit 253, the circuit 253 is set so that the normally existing reset output therefrom disappears for a predetermined period of time which is long enough for the movable blade 224 of the ticket puncher 220 to complete its one punching operation.

A relay 273 has a normally open contact 283 connected in series with the solenoid 221 (FIGS. 5 and 6) between the supply lines. The monostable circuit 253 is normally reset applying its reset output to the relay 273 through an amplifier 263, so that the relay contact 283 is normally closed to energize the solenoid 221 thereby pulling the movable blade 224 of the ticket puncher 220 out of the way of the ticket on the conveyor belt 142. Under this condition, if a commutation ticket comes, it is not arrested by the movable cutter blade 224. However, if a valid ordinary ticket comes, the monostable circuit 253 is set, as previously mentioned, so that the relay 273 is deenergized to open the contact 283. This causes the solenoid 221 to be deenergized and the movable cutter blade 224 to be pulled by the spring 223 into the position crosswise of the conveyor belt 142 as shown in FIG. 5. As a result, the ticket is presently arrested by the projecting movable blade 224. Meanwhile, the monostable circuit 253 is restores restored to its reset condition to energize the relay 273 again, thereby closing the relay contact 283 by to energize the solenoid 221. This pulls in the movable blade 224 to engage in the stationary blade 226 thereby punching or clipping a square portion of the ticket at the forward edge thereof. The punched ticket is then conveyed toward the outlet slot 13.

i The output from the AND element 313 is also applied as a set input to the flip-flop 254 through the OR element 304. The set output from the flip-flop 254 is applied through an amplifier 264 to a relay 274. The relay 274 has a normally open contact 284 connected in series with a solenoid 340 between the supply lines 291 and 292. This solenoid 340 is provided to drive the gate bars 15 and 25. When the relay 274 is energized, its contact 284 is closed to energize the solenoid 340, so that the gate bars 15 and 25 are retracted into the inner sidewalls of the structures 10 and 20, respectively, to open the gateway 30 in front of the passenger.

When the ticket inserted has been found a valid commutation ticket, the circuit 300 produces an output on the line 324, as previously mentioned, which is applied as one input to the AND element 314. Under this condition, when the ticket has passed the photosensor 94, the differentiator 243 produces an output to be applied as the other input to the AND element 314, whereupon the AND element produces an output. This output is applied as a set input to the flip-flop 254 through the OR element 304. The set output from the flip-flop 254 energizes the solenoid 274, so that the gate bars 15 and 25 are opened just as in the case with a valid ordinary ticket.

The valid ordinary ticket is conveyed as far as the outlet slot 13 and the valid commutation ticket, as far as the outlet slot 12. There they are arrested by the stoppers 232 and 233, respectively, and interrupt the light beams being projecting by the sources 82 and 83 onto the photosensors 92 and 93, respectively, whereupon the photosensors produce an output, which is applied as a reset input to the flip-flop 251 through an OR element 305 and then the OR element 301, thereby restoring the original condition of the system ready to accept a succeeding ticket.

The reset output from the flip-flop 251 is applied to a delay circuit 330 comprising a NOT element 311, a diode 331, a condenser 332 and an on-delay element 333. The output from the delay circuit 330 is applied as a reset input to the flip-flop 251. The delay time provided by the circuit 330 is such that during which the ticket travels from the inlet ll to the outlet 13, Normally, before the delay circuit 330 produces an output to reset the flip-flop 251, the ticket has already been sent out of the slot 12 or 13, so that the flip-flop 251., has already been reset by the output from the OR element 305, as previously mentioned. However, in case the ticket inserted into the slot ll does not reach the reading head 181, 182, such as when the passenger once inserts a ticket but pulls it out before it is further drawn in, the output from the delay circuit 330 resets the flip-flop after a predetermined period of time, thereby preventing erroneous operation of the system.

The reset output from the flip-flop 251 is also applied as an inhibit signal to the collation circuit 300 through the OR element 302. The output from the photosensor 91 is also applied as an inhibit input to the collation circuit 300 through the OR element 302. While the inhibit signal is being applied to the circuit 300, it is reset, performing no collating operation. In other words, when the flip-flop 251 is resetupon completion of checking of the ticket 40 or 50, the collation circuit 300 is also reset. Under this condition, when a ticket is inserted, the output from the photosensor 91 sets the flip-flop 251 thereby removing the reset output therefrom applied to the collation circuit 300. However, the output from the photosensor 91 is applied as an inhibit input to the circuit 300 so that the circuit cannot operate. It is only when the ticket has passed the photosensor 91 so that the light from the source 81 enters the photosensor 91 again that the inhibit signal to the circuit 300 is removed and the circuit 300 is ready to operate. This arrangement assures exact operation of the collation circuit 300.

The passage detector 31, when stepped on by the passenger passing through the gate, produces an output to be applied as a reset input to the flip-flop 254, whereupon the relay 274 is deenergized to open the contact 284 and consequently close the gate bars and 25 after the passenger.

In the above description, the apparatus is used as an entrance ticket gate. To make it operate as an exit gate, another ticket shunting device 210 of the same construction as the ticket shunting device 200 may be provided.

The shunting device 210 has a solenoid 211 adapted to be energized by the set output from the monostable circuit 253. That is, the solenoid 211 takes the place of the solenoid 22l connected in series with the contact 283 of the relay 273 (FIG. 7) In this case, the movable blade 224 of the ticket puncher 220 is mechanically or otherwise locked so as not to extend across the conveyor belt 142.

Upon energization of the solenoid 211, a plug plunger 212 pushes a shunting bar 213 crosswise beyond the belt 142, thereby pushing a ticket on the belt into a lateral space 214 A chute (not shown) connects the space 214 to a storage box (not shown), so that the ticket pushed into the space 214 will drop into the box so as not to be returned to the passenger.

A light source and a photosensor are provided in the chute, so that the ticket passing therethrough may interrupt the light entering the photosensor, whereupon the photosensor produces an output, which is applied through the OR elements 305 and 301 to reset the flip-flop 251.

An invalid ticket. whether it be an ordinary ticket or a commutation ticket, is delivered out of the slot 14 by the shunting device 200. A valid commutation ticket is delivered out of the outlet slot 12.

In the above embodiment, the information code marks are relied on for discrimination of the ordinary tickets and the commutation tickets. Any difference in size between the two kinds of tickets or specific marks thereon may also be relied on for the same purpose.

In FIGS. 5 and 6, the ticket is inserted into the slot II and carried through the apparatus in upright position, that is, standing upright on its one longer edge. The ticket may lie flat while it is being conveyed through the apparatus, but is caused to stand upright when it appears at the outlet slot 12 or 13.

FIGS. 8 and 9 show such an arrangement, here, the same reference numerals as used in FIGS. 1, 2, 5 and 6 denote corresponding parts. The basic construction of this embodiment is similar to that shown in FIGS. 5 and 6, so that description will be limited only to those parts different from those of the previous embodiment. In FIGS. FIG. 8, the slots l1, l2 and 13 extend transversely of the length of the structure 10. Inside the inlet slot ll, there is provided a take-in roller section 110 comprising three pairs of rollers, the numerals 116, 116' and 116" designating drive rollers and 111, 111' and 111" free rollers (FIG. 9). Each free roller is mounted on a lever 114 pivotable about a pin 113 and biased by a spring 115 so as to be pressed against its paired drive roller. The numeral 102 designates plates for supporting the ticket.

The ticket inserted through the slot II is drawn in by the paired take-in rollers and transferred onto a conveyor belt 132, lying flat thereon. A guide member 151 is provided at one side of the conveyor belt 132 and a at a little higher level than the belt surface. At the opposite side of the belt there is a lever 162 pivotable about a pin 161 and biased by a spring 163 so that the outer free end of the lever 162 abuts on one longer edge of a ticket on the conveyor belt 132 so as to bring the opposite longer edge thereof into sliding contact with the lateral guide member 161, thereby keeping the ticket in place on the conveyor belt 132. The ticket then passes a pair of magnetic heads 171, 172, then reading heads 181, 182 and then is punched by a ticket puncher 220, and reaches a shunting device 200. The device 200 comprises three drive rollers 205,

206, and 207, each having a pressure roller in frictional contact therewith, and two shunting plates 203' and 203 The shunting plates 203 and 203 are connected by means of levers 203" and 203 respectively, to the plungers 202 and 202 of solenoids 201 and 201.

When a valid ordinary ticket has passed over the roller 205, the solenoid 201' is energized by a signal caused by the reading of the information on the ticket by the reading heads 181 or 182. This causes the plunger 202' to be pulled in so that the shunting plate 203' is turned clockwise about a pin 208 to be inclined upward at a predetermined angle with the direction of movement of the ticket. As a result, the ticket is shunted upward to be drawn further upward by paired rollers 192 and 192' finally to project out ofthe outlet slot 13.

If the ticket is invalid, not the solenoid 201' but the solenoid 201 is energized to push out the plunger 202, thereby turning the shunting plate 203 counterclockwise about a pin 218 to be inclined downward at an angle with the direction of movement of the ticket. As a result, the ticket is shunted downward along guide plate 219 into the lateral outlet slot 14. A storage box may be provided in place of the outlet 14.

If the ticket is a valid commutation ticket, neither solenoid 201' nor 201 is energized, so that the ticket pass three paired rollers 205, 206 and 207 successively.

If the ticket is an invalid commutation ticket, it is shunted downward into the lateral slot 14.

After passing the three paired rollers 205, 206 and 207, the valid commutation ticket rides on the conveyor belt 142. At the other end of the belt 142 there is provided a guide plate 194 inclined upward to direct the ticket on the belt 142 toward paired rollers 195 and 196 disposed between the belt 142 and the outlet slot 12.

FIG. 10 shows a modification of the shunting device 200 shown in FIG. 9. The device shown in FIG. 10 comprises an endless belt 236 extending between the paired rollers 205 and 206 and running about a drive pulley 234 and a free pulley 235. The two pulleys 234 and 235 are supported by a rod 237 which is connected to the plunger 202 of the solenoid 201 through a link 238. When the solenoid 201' remains deenergized, the belt 236 is held horizontal at the same level as the rollers 205 and 206, so that the ticket moves from roller 205 to 206. When the solenoid 201' is energized, the plunger 202' pushes the lever 238 upward thereby turning the rod 237 clockwise about the axis of the roller 234 to incline the belt 237 upwardly toward the outlet slot 13, as shown in dash-anddot line in FIG. 10, so that the ticket is shunted onto the slot 13.

The belt-and-pulley mechanism may be replaced by a resilient plate 239, as shown in FIG. 11. The plate 239 is inclined upward and has its upper end fixed below the roller 191 and its lower free end connected through a link 238 to the plunger 202' of the solenoid 201. As will be easily seen, when the solenoid 201' remains deenergized, the resiliency of the plate 239 keeps the lower end thereof above the level of the rollers 205 and 206. When the solenoid 201 is energized, the lower end of the plate 239 is pulled down to the level of the rollers 205 and 206, so that the ticket is shunted upward to the outlet 13.

To control the devices shown in FIGS. 911, the circuit shown in FIG. 7 must be slightly modified as shown in FIG. 12. That is, a flip-flop 255 is additionally provided to receive as a set input the output from the AND element 313 and as a reset input the output from the photosensor 93. The set output from the flip-flop 255 is applied through an amplifier 265 to a relay 275, whose contact 285 is connected in series with the solenoid 201' between the supply lines 291 and 292. As previously mentioned, the AND element 313 produces an output only when the ticket is a valid. This output sets the flip-flop 255, the set output from which energizes the relay 275. As a result the relay contact 285 is closed to energize the solenoid 201. This causes the shunting belt 236 or plate 239 to be moved in the above-mentioned manners, so that the ticket is shunted toward the outlet 13. When the ticket appears at the outlet 13,

defined in the appended claims.

We claim:

1. Apparatus for operating an automatic ticket gate comprisl. A single ticket insert slot for receiving tickets of first and second different sizes each having information recorded thereon;

2. ticket return means;

3. conveying means for transporting tickets from said insert slot to said return means;

4. means coupled with said conveying means for checking the information recorded on said tickets and indicating validity or invalidity thereof;

5. means responsive to the information checking means and coupled with said conveying means for passing tickets to said return re means in accordance with said information;

6. means coupled with said conveying means for checking the size of said tickets;

7. means responsive to the size checking means and coupled with said conveying means for marking tickets of said first size prior to passage thereof to said return means; and

8. means coupled with said information checking means for actuating said gate in response to indication of a validity.

2. The apparatus of claim I wherein said insert slot and return means are located on the entrance and exit sides of said gate, respectively, and said conveying means extends generally parallel with the path of movement of a user of said li. (m l n1 llil W gate.

3. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said marking means comprises a cutter adapted to be extended across the path of said tickets along said conveying means, said cutter being operably to stop a'ticket and to remove a portion thereof as it is withdrawn from said path;

4. The apparatus of claim 1 including means coupled with said conveying means defining respective paths of travel for valid and invalid tickets, and means responsive to said information checking means for guiding tickets along said paths in accordance with said information.

5. The apparatus of claim 4 wherein said path for valid tickets includes a ticket return slot for tickets of one of said sizes and a storage bin for tickets of the other size.

6. The apparatus of claim 4 wherein said path for invalid tickets includes a ticket return slot lock located on the entrance side of said gate.

7. The apparatus of claim 4 wherein said ticket return path means includes said path for valid tickets and includes first and second ticket return slots for said first and second ticket sizes, respectively.

8. The apparatus of claim 7 including ticket guide means coupled to said conveying means and supporting said tickets on one edge thereof whereby said tickets appear at said first and second return slots standing upright on said edge.

9. The apparatus of claim 8 wherein said conveying means transports said tickets lying flat thereon, said return slots are positioned in a horizontal surface, and said apparatus includes ticket guide means for projecting said tickets substantially upright out of said return slots.

10. The apparatus of claim I wherein said insert slot has a width narrower than the length of tickets of both of said sizes,

- and said size checking means includes means for checking the widths of said tickets.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3780844 *Sep 11, 1972Dec 25, 1973J BaliTicket accepting machines in particular for public transit system
US4213039 *Oct 16, 1978Jul 15, 1980Automatic Parking Devices, Inc.Dynamic card reader
US5135095 *May 6, 1991Aug 4, 1992Skidata Computerhandelsgesellschaft M.B.H.Portable hand device for machine processing of data carried on a data carrier
US5168150 *May 13, 1991Dec 1, 1992Electronique Serge DassaultDevice for the processing of a magnetic-track ticket, especially an air transport ticket
US7363267 *Jun 5, 2000Apr 22, 2008The Ticket Reserve, Inc.Contingency-based options and futures for contingent travel accommodations
Classifications
U.S. Classification194/210
International ClassificationG07B11/00, G06K13/07, G06K13/02
Cooperative ClassificationG06K13/07
European ClassificationG06K13/07